Tag Archives: heritage

Thursday Doors | September 28, 2017

“Blacksmith Shop” Black Creek Pioneer Village

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Blacksmith Shop” Black Creek Pioneer Village

It’s been a while since I’ve posted on Thursday Doors. Getting ready for a local Studio Tour has taken much of my time, as well as an expanded work role. In fact my blog posts in general have dropped off, so I find myself with a little time to go through my accumulated images, of which doors are always an element.

This image was made a full two weeks ago, at Toronto’s Black Creek Pioneer Village, where I volunteer every year for the annual Pioneer Fest. Unlike the past few years of rain and cold, this year was hot and bright, yet leaves had started turning, which made for some interesting images.

I’ve always admired this blacksmith shop, with its large inviting doors. They are also functional in helping with ventilation, as this place gets pretty hot and smokey. I made this composition by deliberately positioning the tree in the foreground, to hide a junk pile along the side of the building. It also creates a nice ‘frame’ as the branches drape across the roof.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/370 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

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Thursday Doors | August 17, 2017

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Copper House, Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors. 

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“582 Sherbourne Street” James Cooper House, Toronto

Today, a return to another of the grand old houses of Toronto’s Sherbourne Street. This one has fascinated me for some time now. Whenever I drive by, I’m drawn to the interesting statues installed on the property. So, when I had the opportunity to walk the area a few weeks ago, this was definitely on my list of places to check out.

I had no idea of the history of this majestic “Second Empire” style building. The building was built in 1881 for James Cooper, a wealthy merchant and show retailer. This area was one of the wealthiest places in Toronto at the time the house was built and it’s in the best condition. After Cooper departed, the building became home to the Keeley Institute for Nervous Diseases, an organization assisting those with alcohol and substance abuse problems. In 1910, it became home to the Toronto Knights of Columbus, who used the facility as a meeting and fundraising venue for almost a century. In 2008 the property was purchased by the Tridel Group, with the intention of building a condominium tower on the site, which is designated by the City of Toronto as a heritage building, so it had to be preserved. Or, in this case, moved.

It turns out, it’s also one of the heaviest moves of a building in Canadian history. In 2008, the 800 ton building was moved twenty feet east and five feet south from its original location, to make room for a condominium tower being built on the same property. The move cost the developer a reported $1M but preserved an architectural treasure from Toronto’s past. The developer has taken great care to maintain the house, which serves as an amenities centre for the adjacent condominium tower.

Oh, yes, and back to the statues, the property has several, all in a wildlife motif, with wolves, stags, and foxes attached to metal bases, with a reflected statue beneath it. The wolf and the fox sit horizontal, but the stag is a vertical installation, quite eye catching. I’ve included the Google Streetview link, though it does not do it justice, as well as an image of the house being moved.

The things you learn when you look for nice doors.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/120 sec; f/1.8; ISO 32

Thursday Doors | June 22, 2017

“322 Dundas Street West” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“322 Dundas Street West” – Toronto

In this image, it’s the doorway, not so much the doors that draw my attention. Along this stretch of Toronto heritage buildings, and across from the Art Gallery of Ontario, this one really stands out, with its fuchsia columns and yellow brick. I had to go through my media library to verify I had not posted it previously and it turns out that I have not.

I found that odd, that I have not yet posted an image of doors that I have enjoyed for several years. As it turns out, my oldest daughter’s friend lived here for a few years. It is a small world.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/300 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 80

“Heritage Peony -Edulis Superba, 1824”

“Heritage Peony -Edulis Superba, 1824”

“The long roots of the peony strike deep into the past.”
– Alice Coats

Today I’m sharing a peony that I have many of and I don’t believe this is the first blossom either. Several blossoms opened a few days ago, so it’s hard to know. The plant itself came from abandoned (expropriated) farm near my home. The family who used to live there (Spangs) were close friends with my wife’s family and are distant relations.

The land was expropriated (taken by the government) back in the nineteen seventies, with plans to build an international airport. Those plans never materialized and many families were displaced for nothing. Over time, houses and farm building were rented out or simply abandoned to rot. Many of these farms also had beautiful gardens at one point, now overgrown with grasses and thick shrubbery. I noticed the bright pinks of these peonies from the road, as I drove by and asked permission to dig them up. Permission was granted and I proceeded to recover some twenty plants, some of which went to my gardens and others were given to friends, as well as planted in the gardens at my kids’ school.

I have no idea how old the plants are, but peonies can live for close to a century and these have roots the size of yams. I have a touch with peonies and most plants bloomed the next year. These are also prolific bloomers, with each stem producing up to three flowers (you can see two more buds in the photo), making for a terrific display.

As I enjoy them, so do others and I’m often asked about them. It’s nice to be able to tell this story, give a bit of local history, and simply enjoy the lasting beauty of these deep pink blossoms, as they fill the air with their rich fragrance.

This richly fragrant, deep pink relic is one of the oldest peonies of all, and yet, writes expert Martin Page, it’s “still one of the best.” Introduced in France soon after the first lactiflora peonies arrived from China, it has been cherished ever since  for its “good form, strong color, and delightful fragrance” (Boyd, 1928).

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“First White Peony”

“First White Peony”

“She was pure, it was true, as he had never dreamed of purity; but cherries stained her lips.”
― Jack London

In this year’s theme of ‘firsts’, here’s yet another. The first white peony made its appearance in  my gardens this morning. These white peonies hold a special place in our family, having been passed do from my wife’s grandmother.

It’s an interesting blossom, being a beautiful pure white, with a tiny red fringe on the inside petals. I have yet to discover the particular variety. We also have another variant, similar to this one, but with splashes of red in the interior petals rather than the fine fringe.

I love these heritage peonies for a number of reasons: they are extremely hardy, once established, they have an intense wonderful fragrance, which fills the morning air, the blossoms are long lasting and make beautiful floral arrangements for indoors. Finally, once flowers are shed, the foliage is lush and green and changes to a deep crimson in the fall.

Late spring and early summer is a great time of anticipation in the garden. Watching blossoms going from bud to flower overnight is almost magical. Knowing our family ancestors have also experienced these moments makes it even more special. Common expressions among my family generally have a theme like, “Oh, look! Grandma Fretz’s peony is blooming, just in time for Fathers Day.”

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – Sept 29, 2016

broom-makers-door-black-creek-pioneer-village

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

A step back in time, to a simpler, less ornate door than I have presented recently. This door can be found at Toronto’s Black Creek Pioneer Village, a collection of heritage buildings from the Toronto area, assembled to represent Toronto’s pioneer past.

I like the simple line and practicality of this door to the Broom Maker’s Shop, circa 1844. The building was moved here from Sherwood , Ontario and has an active interpretive centre. I’ve had some good conversations with the broom maker in the past and love the simple design of this building with its wonderful door and windows.

With the door open and the light coming through the window, it provides a glimpse of the interior.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/4.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – September 08, 2016

knox-hall-doors-university-of-torontoThis week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

This week, a return to the University of Toronto and it numerous spectacular doors. Today, I have chosen the main doorway to Knox College, another building on the U of T grounds, proudly facing the central campus grounds as they have for over one hundred years.

I’d like to return her to photograph the interior. The website link above shows a brief glimpse into this architectural wonder.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com