Tag Archives: hiking

“Leap Day Trudge”

“Leap Day Trudge”

“If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.”
― Anne Bradstreet

This day, February 29, a leap day, was yet another opportunity for me to get outdoors and spend some time enjoying the fresh fallen snow. It was a rather crisp day, with a temperature of -13 C, calm, and bright. I figured that the cold temperatures might keep many people indoors, and I was right.

When I got to the trailhead, there was not a single car in the lot and the trails were completely untouched. I had brought my snowshoes along because the 30 cm of fresh snow we received over the previous two days would not provide an easy walk. I was wise in choosing this option because even with snowshoes on, I found myself breaking fresh trail through deep powdery snow for the entire 5 km hike, high stepping the entire way. It was exhausting yet exhilarating at the same time.

To walk through this winter world in solitude and experiencing the simple things like the sound of the sound of snow puffing and crunching underfoot, the eerie crackling of the trees in the deep cold, and the soft flitter of birds high above is refreshing to me.

Because the snow was so deep, I had plenty of opportunities to simply pause, rest, and listen as I caught my breath. It also offered the opportunity to make a few photos as I stood on the trail surveying my surroundings and made me realize just how deep the snow was by the newly packed trail behind me.

The photo I chose today is looking back at the trail after having emerged from the forest into a small clearing. You can see my path between the trees.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Winter Wanderings”

“Winter Wanderings”

“Winter is not all bleak and gray, if you look closely, subtle colours abound in the most wonderful places” – Ed Lehming

Well, after a long hiatus, I have returned to my photography and writing.

Last year was ‘disruptive’ at best. Too many changes came at me too quickly and left me overwhelmed and uninspired. I was ‘retired’ from work briefly and It took me some time to come to terms with the new environment thrust upon me. I’m still coming to terms with this new reality.

I did continue to get out and make photos and posted a few along the way. Autumn yielded some stunning shots and I had intended to get back to a more regular cadence of photos and posts till a simple household activity re-injured my MCL and left me unable to venture onto the trails I love so much.

Without my hikes, which are my time to relax and renew, I found myself completely uninspired. I did get the occasional imagine in as the winter wore on, but I fell into a bit of a creative funk.

As winter wore on, my knee continued to heal and today I felt it was strong enough for me to hit the trails again. Today was a beautiful late February day, filled with bright sunshine, mild temperatures, and the blessing of birdsong. The trails were snowcovered and packed down but not icy. A perfect day to begin again. I found the forest welcoming me once more with beautiful compositions and a surprising variety of subtle colours, which inspired this image, made looking forward as I walked along the trail.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Fairytale Forest” – Secord Forest, Uxbridge

“Fairytale Forest” - Secord Forest, Uxbridge

“The colours of Autumn turn the world into a wonderland of colour, sound, and scent. There are times when I feel that I have left reality and entered the land of fables.”
– Ed Lehming

As I beheld the scene before me I was filled with an absolute sense of awe. The mid-afternoon sunlight filled the forest with a soft and wondrous display of light and colour. I literally felt like I have stepped into a magical painting and the world fell away around me. Only this place existed.

Such is the nature of many autumn forest scenes. They seem unreal. Where only a few weeks ago the forest was lush and green, much of the canopy has fallen away revealing stunning colours, filled with light and energy. Those who spend time in the forests and on the trails will know the feelings this evokes.

It hit me even more this time, as I only had a short time to be in the woods. My day was filled largely with outdoors tasks that had to be done before the frost and snow come to my area, so I was able to carve out a little space in the day to drive to one of my favourite trails in hopes of a few photos before the wind and rain forecast would end the show for another season. As you can see, I was not disappointed, even within a very short hike, the forest offered up its gift to me, and I was a willing recipient.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/730 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Brightness in the Squall”

“Brightness in the Squall”

“The difference between darkness and brightness is how you thrive on those moments and how you use such circumstances with goodwill in your spirit.” 
― Angelica Hopes

I find myself, on this day in early March, wondering where time has gone. It’s been many weeks since I felt inspired to sit and write. I’ve been out making photos, but the days have been cold, dull, and largely uninspiring.

Today, I set forth to spend some time in nature and see what she had to say to me, among the trees. And, once more, I found myself alone on the trails, the solitude and quite refreshing me. The only sounds I heard were the crunching of my boots in the crisp snow and the gentle breeze among the branches.

I’d only gotten a few minutes into my hike when light snow began to float down around me, further quieting the world around me. The sparse snow soon built into a full squall by the time I got further along the trail, refreshing the scenery and sticking to the thin branches along the trail.

Through this curtain of white, the occasional shimmer of bright colour flashed life into the winter world. The dried leaves of the beech trees, which hold fast throughout the winter, were like orange flames dancing in the dark branches. One that really stood out for me is pictured above. The thin beech tree appears to adorn the large maple behind it with it wonderful leaves, to the point where you hardly notice the beech and are fooled, without closer inspection, to believe the colour belongs to the maple.

It’s moments like this, where I simply need to pause and enjoy the scenes before me that continue to draw me outdoors, regardless of the weather.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 100 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Iceland Journal – “Trail to Sandfell” – Fáskrúðsfjörður, East Iceland

“Trail to Sandfell” - Fáskrúðsfjörður , East Iceland

“The path to our destination is not always a straight one. We go down the wrong road, we get lost, we turn back. Maybe it doesn’t matter which road we embark on. Maybe what matters is that we embark.” 
― Barbara Hall

During our journey along Iceland’s Ring Road, we took many occasions to satisfy our curiosity by hiking off the road when the opportunity presented itself. One of these opportunities was this gravel road, which leads up into the mountains that line the west shore of Fáskrúðsfjörður fjord.

The main reason we chose this trail was easy access from the main highway, meaning we could pull off the road safely and park our vehicle by driving part way up the road, till it became too rough to continue. Once parked, we donned our backpacks, filled with camera gear, and headed up the road, which soon narrowed to a rugged trail .Our goal: get to the snow line at the base of the mountains which you see in the distance. The highest peak, Sandfell, is 743 meters high. We were actually hoping to get part way up its slopes.

As our hike continued, the road banked sharply to the left, following a deep ravine toward the base of Sanfell. Something that is not often mentioned in the standard tourist literature is just how rugged Iceland’s terrain can be. Most scenes look quite smooth and simple to traverse, but in reality, the rugged landscape is filled with unseen obstacles, sharp rocks, ice-cold streams, and deep fissures The ravine I mentioned is just one such obstacle. A small glacial creek flows through it, but the banks are steep, jagged lava, and it takes time to find safe passage into the ravine and back up.

After crossing the ravine we were faced with a man-made obstacle, namely, a wide field of deep grass, to be used as feed for sheep or cattle. We only got a few meters into this dense, ankle grabbing grass, till we realized that crossing the field towards our goal would be absolutely exhausting. So, we turned back and forded the ravine once more. As I said, we had hoped to climb part way up Sandfell, but there was just too much terrain between us and the mountain

The other interesting thing we came across on this hike, was a ‘rustic; cabin at the end of the trail. Cabin near Fáskrúðsfjörður, East IcelendThe owner had built it at the edge of the mountains and I can only imagine the lovely view in springtime and summer. The mountains fill the view through one window and the other side looks down across the long fjord.

So, we stood, at the base slopes of these majestic mountains, simply enjoying the view and taking a break from driving.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/2200 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Hillside Path”

“Hillside Path”

“It isn’t enough to pick a path—you must go down it. By doing so, you see things you couldn’t possibly see when you started out; you may not like what you see, some of it may be confusing, but at least you will have, as we like to say, “explored the neighborhood.” The key point here is that even if you decide you’re in the wrong place, there is still time to head toward the right place.” 
― Ed Catmull

This image came together almost immediately. As I stood at the edge of a steep gully, looking across miles of forest for this high vantage point the path along the edge beckoned me forward. I had just changed lenses from my 90mm macro to my 70-200 mm telephoto so that I could shoot a bit wider than my 90mm allowed.

My first glance through my viewfinder yielded this scene. The slightly winding path and the placement of the trees made for a simple composition which nicely represented the scene before me. The slight movement simply accents it and the long exposure saturates the colours a bit more, and also brings life to the image.

This spot was about half way around a loop trail and tied in nicely with my theme of gradual transition from summer to autumn because of the presence of more yellows and oranges. Not quite autumn, but definitely hinting at it; a turn in the path and in the seasons.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/18.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Gentle Way”

“The Gentle Way”

“Once you have traveled, the voyage never ends, but is played out over and over again in the quietest chambers. The mind can never break off from the journey.” 
― Pat Conroy

This image, while slightly darker than some of my prior posts, represents so well my typical experiences on the trail; bright sunshine streams between the branches light above, the canopy has a slight yellow tinge, as the days shorten, there are wonderful shifts in the light, each tree reflecting a slightly different shade of brown gray, or silver; far in the distance, a bright meadow shows through a gap in the trees, my destination, or just a glade along the trail edge?

The path, soft and sandy, littered with leaves, has become my gentle way. I tread these trails in reverence for the beauty they lead me through and am grateful to those early conservationists who had the foresight to set this land apart, so that I and many more could enjoy the wonder of the forest trails .

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70mm
1/4 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Light that Lights My Way”

“The Light that Lights My Way”

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” 
― Ursula K. Le Guin

Scenes like this are one of the reasons I hike. I’ve referred to these dappled pools of light as “God-Light”, to quote C.S. Lewis. These small patches of golden light, like pools of energy seem to appear on all but the most overcast days. They are but one of the many effects in the forest which have a profound impact on me. In the forest, I feel in tune with my surroundings, the busyness of the workweek fades to a dull memory and my world come alive.

There is more to the light around me, while it lights my way, it warms my spirit and brings out the child in me. I find myself transfixed by the wonderful diversity of the forest paths, and grinning at simple things like a butterfly trying to land in the wind. Many of these scenes go undocumented, too brief to be captured as a photo, but remain with me as beautiful memories of my walks through the woods.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/10.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Just Around the Next Bend”

“Just Around the Next Bend”

“Never forget that anticipation is an important part of life. Work’s important, family’s important, but without excitement, you have nothing. You’re cheating yourself if you refuse to enjoy what’s coming.” 
― Nicholas Sparks

Part of the enjoyment I get from hiking is the anticipation, the ‘unknown’ about what’s around the next bend. Though I’ve hiked these trails for years now, there is always something new to discover. On days where I feel uninspired, all I have to do is get on the trail, look around that next band, and I’m almost always treated with something unexpected, some play of the light, or a new plant that I had not noticed.

In this image, along the theme is anticipation, along with the broader theme of this series of photos, there is the knowledge that autumn is also just around the bend, as evidenced by the colour shift from deep green to hints of yellow and even a few coppery-orange leaves to be found along the trail. The changes will soon accelerate and “In the Blink”, it will be autumn. Given our weather this summer, I’m anticipating some beautiful colours.

For those who look at my camera settings (below), you will have noticed that I have been adjusting the ISO and aperture as lighting conditions vary throughout this hike. I keep my shutter speed consistent at 1/4 sec, as this is the speed I feel produces the best results with my process.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/11.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Light Along the Way”

“Light Along the Way”

“Let me bring you songs from the wood:
To make you feel much better than you could know
Dust you down from tip to toe
Show you how the garden grows
Hold you steady as you go
Join the chorus if you can:
It’ll make of you an honest man.”
– Jethro Tull

Strangely, the Jethro Tull song that I chose for my quote kept going through my head for much of this hike. How appropriate is that?

One of the things that I really notice as I hike is the marvellous play of light through the canopy, high above. I’ve talked about this before, how the forest floor fairly glows as beams of light penetrate the leaves.

This light is nearly always present, wit the exception of overcast or rainy days, and even then some stray light seems to make it through.

On this day, an extended 14km hike gave me lots of time to drink in this light as it reflected off the trail and cast a warm glow on the surrounding trees. It’s this wonderful contrast of light and shadow that I enjoy so much as a photographer and participant in the life of the forest. This was a fairly hot yet breezy day and the light was constantly shifting. As I did not have my wide angle lens handy, I resorted to my iPhone to try to capture one of these moments along the trail.

The resulting image was OK, but as I find with many stills, they fail to portray the light an energy of the living forest, so I used a Photoshop plug-in called Topaz Impressions to modify the photo till it ‘felt’ right. Which reminds me, I need to pick up my paint brushes again 🙂

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/30 sec; f/1.8; ISO 25

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com