Tag Archives: history

Thursday Doors | July 06, 2017

“Belanger House Doors - Royal Ontario Museum”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Belanger House Doors – Royal Ontario Museum”

This is yet another museum door. Not a door to a museum, but a door ‘within’ a museum. I shared another one a few weeks ago. The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto has a section devoted to Canada and included in that collection are several doors of historical significance.

This door came from Belanger House and dates back to the early 18th century. The house itself was situated outside the Quebec village of Saint-Jean-Port-Joli, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. The town itself is now well known for its wood carvers and it would appear that has been the case for several centuries now.

This door highlights the elaborate woodwork that adorned the main room or common room. The museum acquired the entire room around 1931 through ethnologist Marius Barbeau. The museum has two of the four walls on display. In addition to the wall panels they also have three doors, four windows, a fireplace opening, three cupboards, three boxed ceiling beams and three fluted columns.

As I mentioned in my previous post about this display, it shows that doors play an important part in our history and it’s good to see that someone had the foresight to preserve them for all to admire and enjoy.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/13sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 100

“Heritage Peony -Edulis Superba, 1824”

“Heritage Peony -Edulis Superba, 1824”

“The long roots of the peony strike deep into the past.”
– Alice Coats

Today I’m sharing a peony that I have many of and I don’t believe this is the first blossom either. Several blossoms opened a few days ago, so it’s hard to know. The plant itself came from abandoned (expropriated) farm near my home. The family who used to live there (Spangs) were close friends with my wife’s family and are distant relations.

The land was expropriated (taken by the government) back in the nineteen seventies, with plans to build an international airport. Those plans never materialized and many families were displaced for nothing. Over time, houses and farm building were rented out or simply abandoned to rot. Many of these farms also had beautiful gardens at one point, now overgrown with grasses and thick shrubbery. I noticed the bright pinks of these peonies from the road, as I drove by and asked permission to dig them up. Permission was granted and I proceeded to recover some twenty plants, some of which went to my gardens and others were given to friends, as well as planted in the gardens at my kids’ school.

I have no idea how old the plants are, but peonies can live for close to a century and these have roots the size of yams. I have a touch with peonies and most plants bloomed the next year. These are also prolific bloomers, with each stem producing up to three flowers (you can see two more buds in the photo), making for a terrific display.

As I enjoy them, so do others and I’m often asked about them. It’s nice to be able to tell this story, give a bit of local history, and simply enjoy the lasting beauty of these deep pink blossoms, as they fill the air with their rich fragrance.

This richly fragrant, deep pink relic is one of the oldest peonies of all, and yet, writes expert Martin Page, it’s “still one of the best.” Introduced in France soon after the first lactiflora peonies arrived from China, it has been cherished ever since  for its “good form, strong color, and delightful fragrance” (Boyd, 1928).

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – March 30, 2017

“Church of the Redeemer” - Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Church of the Redeemer” – Toronto

I have missed this beautiful door on the past few visits, as the church itself was undergoing renovations. The benefit to those renovations is that now we are presented with nicely restored doors.

There is something about the contrast of the rich red-brown doors and the slightly yellow limestone arches. Despite the renovations, there is still a nice patina on the stones of this church, which was founded in September 3, 1871. Old photos I’ve recently found are a sharp contrast to this church, which at the time, sat on farmland on the edge of a growing city. Have look at the Streetview compared to the unattributed 1879 image.churchotr1879

If you look back to last week’s post you will notice that the church is essentially across my right shoulder as I made the image of the museum doors.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/60 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 25

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Uxbridge Autumn”

“Uxbridge Autumn”

“Who will bear witness to these small islands and oases of wildness as land is divided and sold to become strip malls, housing developments,and parking lots? What happens to the natural history here? We must bear witness.”
― Joni L. James

The sky yesterday was unbelievable. I had a brief errand to run which put me on the road towards Uxbridge, Ontario. From my window, this scene unfolded and I had to stop to capture it, to bear witness to this ‘oasis’, literally, on the outskirts of local development. All too soon these places will be mere memories.

Cold winds blew thin clouds in from the north and many trees had dropped their leaves already, but what remained was gorgeous! The sun bathed the rolling farm fields in a warm light that contradicted the cold wind and set the distant treeline ablaze with yellow light. I’m so happy I had my camera with me and was able to do the image justice. I can almost see the clouds drifting across the scene.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – August 25, 2016

“University College Doors” - University of Toronto

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Yet another of many images made during my tour of the University of Toronto campus a few weeks ago

The door above belongs to the University of Toronto’s “University College Building”. This building sites in the centre of the main campus. The plaque below can be seen on either side of the door in the image above above, the lefthand one in French and righthand one in English, Canada’s official languages.University College Plaque

 

The door is almost lost in the elaborate facade, with its intricate stone work and concentric arches. I also included the details of part of the main tower to add scale to this image. It truly is a beautiful door, and one of many in the downtown Toronto campus. More to follow.
Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Abandoned Church” – Bruce County Road 40

“Abandoned Church” - Bruce County Road 40

“The problem with churches of all sorts, is that so often they ignore the key teachings of the Sermon on the Mount, like the doctrine of love. So often we ask God to be on our side instead of asking that we be blessed enough to be on His. That said, the wheat and the tares must grow up together, and in the days of harvest they will be separated properly.”
― David Holdsworth

Another view from my Bruce County road trip and just down the road from the beautiful wheatfield that I photographed earlier.

When I drive past these abandoned buildings, I inevitably find myself asking, “What happened here?”

At some point in it’s history, this would have been an active local church. People would have gathered here on Sundays, met as friends and family, sat through a sermon, and worshipped. And then, suddenly, or gradually, attendance dwindled and the doors closed. Was there discord, did the leadership move away, or were other pastures greener? I’m curious why someone would leave a beautiful building like this to simply decay. What went through the mind of the person who turned off the lights and locked the door, for the last time? Did they ever envision this, or was there a hope to return on some future date?

At this point, I’d say, it’s beyond salvaging.

It sits, forlorn, along the roadside, it’s doors locked with a rusty chain and padlock, most of the glass fallen out of the windows, left to return to the elements. There’s no marker even identifying it. All that remains is a shell of what was and testament to what might have been.

Since posting this originally, I came across the history, if you are interested. It was the Williscroft Baptist Church and closed its doors in the 1960s as did the rest of the town.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 31 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“York River Crossing” – Slabtown, Ontario

“York River Crossing” - Slabtown, Ontario

“Some beautiful paths can’t be discovered without getting lost.”
― Erol Ozan

Back to Slabtown, who’s only claim to fame, at present, seems to be the bridge that crosses the York River. In days gone by, it must have been a thriving mill town. Today, not so much. At this point in the river’s journey, it has just passed through the Great Bend. A long, fairly slow flowing section of the river.

It’s nice to be able to view different portions of the river as they pass below the roads. I’ve paddled sections of it and every bend is a new experience. Here, the river widens before entering the Conroy Marsh, eventually joining the mighty Madawaska River.

It was a great experience taking a couple of short backroad drives, to explore the area we have spent summers in for the past thirteen years. Most of that time was spend with our children and not so much just venturing out to new territory.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 70 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com