Tag Archives: Hydrangea

“Single Hydrangea in Vase”

“Single Hydrangea in Vase”

“A flower does not use words to announce its arrival to the world; it just blooms.” 
― Matshona Dhliwayo

As I write this, thunder is booming and the rain is coming down in sheets. Only moments before, my wife cut one of our Annabelle Hydrangea blossoms, for fear of them being further damaged. You see, this year, with all the rain we’ve had, the blossoms are huge. By huge, I mean the size of the average person’s head, and thus, at risk in the rain.

For hydrangeas, in the rain, size is not a good thing, since they retain the moisture, which increases their weight, either bending the flower stems or breaking them off altogether. Most of our are now bent flat, the blossoms resting on the ground.

As it sat on out table, saved from the rain, I took the opportunity to move it to the studio for a few shots. I’m not a fan of showing the vase in my photos, but this one seemed to work.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 200

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“Hydrangea”

“Hydrangea”

“I’ll admit that my garden now grows hope in lavish profusion, leaving little room for anything else. I suppose it has squeezed out more practical plants like caution and common sense. Still, though, hope does not flourish in every garden, and I feel thankful it has taken root in mine.”
― Sharon Kay Penman

A photo of my neighbour’s hydrangea this time. You see, the hydrangeas we have are white Annabelles and only bloom white. Our neighbours however, have a different variety which blooms pink, due to the alkalinity of the soil. Unless the soil has been amended, hydrangeas in Ontario bloom pink, yet the same variety will bloom blue in regions with acidic soil .

I have seen people try to cheat and buy blue hydrangeas for their gardens, which gradually turn pink, as the soil acidity changes.

I actually like the pink colour. In the case of this hydrangea, you are seeing the back of the blossom. Even though it’s a front on view, the flowers flip over, revealing the beautiful pink colour, while the inside of the blossoms are a creamy white. I’m not sure of the variety of this hydrangea, once more, I lean on the knowledge of those more savvy in the naming of specific plants, but they may be a variety of lacecap.

Another desirable trait of this particular species is that it seems quite drought resistant and despite the intensely hot days and the lack of rain this summer, it seems to have flourished, while my Annabelles have smaller than normal blossoms, many sunburned from many hot, dry days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm with 20mm macro extender
2 sec, f/16.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Annabelle Hydrangea”

Annabelle Hydrangea

“One passionate heart can brighten the world. From person to person the chain reaction burns through us — setting heart to heart ablaze, and lighting the way for us all!”
― Bryant McGill

Here I am at photo four of this expanding project “Ordinary Flower in a Different Light”. Today’s subject is an Annabelle Hydrangea from our front garden.

This incredible flowering shrub is quite the sight when fully in bloom. Some of the blossoms become so large that the stem can’t bear the weight and they fold over. Those blossoms are often cut off and brought inside for us to enjoy as a centrepiece floral arrangement.

The hydrangea was a bit more of a challenge to photograph as the bright white flowers dominate the image and make it more of a challenge to get all the elements balanced. I’m still learning and adjusting camera settings as I go, but this is the best of the lot.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 92 mm
1/100 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Hydrangea on Ice”

“Hydrangeas on Ice”

“What is it to die but to stand naked in the wind and to melt into the sun?”
― Kahlil Gibran

This year, I left a few dried hydrangea blooms in my garden. My usual ritual is to trim them all down in the fall. I’m glad I left them, they added some interest in this past, dull, nearly snowless winter, and created a nice franewirk for our recent freezing rain event.

For those who have never experienced freezing rain, I’ll include a brief description here:
Freezing rain occurs when the ground temperature is below freezing while the air layers above are warmer. The precipitation falls as rain and freezes on contact with the ground. The end effect is that everything is coated with an ever increasing layer of clear ice. If conditions are right, this accumulation can be over an inch thick and cause major damage to trees and powerlines. Because it is a gradual accumulation, delicate plants, which would collapse in snow, are held rigid by the ice that encases them.

This was the case with the hydrangeas pictured above. A thin coating of clear ice built up over a period of a few hours, making them look like the are coated in clear glass.

It’s a beautiful effect, unless you are driving and have to chisel the ice from your car, or try to walk, since the ice is usually covered in a thin layer of semi-frozen water, making it extremely slippery. This is not a good feature when you are trying to walk around with your camera. The other thing with freezing rain is that it tends to be a very brief, beautiful event, which generally melts away within a few hours, as the temperatures rise.

I find it to be a challenging time photographically, since everything is beautiful and it’s difficult to isolate a particular composition within all that beauty.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 130 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 -0.33, ISO 200

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