Tag Archives: imagination

“Chess Set”

chess-set-white

“Chess Set - Black”

“Sharing tales of those we’ve lost is how we keep from really losing them.”
― Mitch Albom

One of the treasures my father left me is this beautiful chess set. As a child I used to look at them closely, admiring the fine details of this cast iron, the white players nickel plated and the black being copper plated, chess set.

I have no idea where he got them, only that he brought the set with him from Germany when he immigrated. In my imagination, they came from some old castle or a grand house where nobles used to play with them. An unlikely source, but part of the childhood memory.

Given the marvelous details, I thought they might make a nice subject to document with a photo. It’s also a chance to play with macros settings and lighting some more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro @90mm
1.0 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

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“Study in Wood #6” – Seaton Trail, Whitvale

“Study in Wood #6”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
― William Blake

I absolutely love the William Blake quote above. It goes beyond simply this image.

Number 6 in the series and growing. I keep coming across these gnarly old specimens, standing along the trails, or in city parks. I find myself staring at them, immersed in their story, while others pass them by as merely ‘stumps’. They all remind me of abstract paintings or deeply furrowed sculptures. Their lives recorded; marked out in intricate patterns, each unique.This particular tree had been recently stripped of its bark, revealing smooth undulating wood, with only tinges of moss taking hold.

Winter winds had embedded a few stray cedar and spruce needles in a hollow. I was not sure if I wanted to include them in this composition, but they are part of the image in front of me, so I decided to leave them in.

The smooth surface of this tree is so different from most trees I see. It reveals all the curves and bumps of a slow growing hardwood. Though the bark is gone, I expect it’s a member of the maple family. tree aficionados, feel free to help me on this one. By the end of summer, I expect this old fellow will be darkened with moss, it’s surface transforming from a solid, almost ivory-like texture to one mottled with mildew and softening as the decay process takes hold. Yet, here he is preserved as a photo for me to enjoy even when he’s gone back to the ground that birthed him, so many years ago.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 82 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Kill Plate” – Atro Gallery of Gems, New York

“Kill Plate” - Atro Gallery of Gems, New York

“As I see it, life is an effort to grip before they slip through one’s fingers and slide into oblivion, the startling, the ghastly or the blindingly exquisite fish of the imagination before they whip away on the endless current and are lost for ever in oblivion’s black ocean.”
― Mervyn Peake

A “Kill Plate” is the geological term of a particular strata in which numerous fossilized animals can be found. In this case, a large number of fish, each about two inches long, all died and were preserved as fossils in a narrow layer of sandstone. We will never know what event caused this mass death to happen, perhaps a big wave deposited the fish to die high up a beach somewhere and subsequent waves buried them? Or, a river dried up, with the same effect. It leaves us with an unanswered story to ponder, but the end is written in stone.

I should have written down more of the details about this particular artifact. The primary reason I made the photo was that I saw this as a piece of art and have neither the space, nor the funds for the original, though I am fascinated by the details and wanted to spend more time looking at it. It’s a bit like a large stenciled drawing, with the same shape repeating randomly over and over on a carefully textured background.

I can picture the person who first saw this slab, peeling back the top layer and revealing the scene above. I also imagine this is a small portion of a much bigger slab that was divided and sold off to galleries and collectors.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 80 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 250

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“Curl” – Point Clarke, Ontario

“November Waves” - Point Clarke, Ontario

As my fingers froze inside my gloves, I still took the time to look at the wind driven waves in awe. With 50 km/h winds pushing the waters toward the beach, long ribbons of water rolled over themselves, pulling sand from the shallow waters below them.

Such is the case here. A long wave, about a meter high, rolls in and carries strange forms within it, as the darker sand is lifted from the lakebed and mixed inside the wave as they are driven ashore.

I was trying to capture the variations inside these waves but only have a few images to share, as it was too cold to remain on the exposed beech more for more than a few minutes. If I let my imagination wander, this one remains me of some of the prehistoric cave paintings of bison, which I can almost see moving inside the wave.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @200 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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