Tag Archives: insect

“Hepatica and Beetle”

“Hepatica and Beetle”

“Ugly or beautiful, it is the little creatures that make the world go round. We should celebrate and appreciated them in all their wonderful diversity.” 
― Dave Goulson

Inevitably, if you make enough images of flowers outdoors, nature dictates that a bug will be in one of those images. That was the case last weekend, as I was photographing the many beautiful hepaticas that had just started blooming. Just as I was about to hit the shutter release, this bug, a blister beetle, I believe, landed on the flower.

Rather that wave it off or wait for it to leave, I decided to incorporate it into my shot. I think it adds a natural element and makes the image more ‘real’ and less static.

As I looked around, after the shot, I noticed that many of the hepaticas had some form of insect on them. Some, like the first honey-bee I saw, are pollinators of these early bloomers, which provide an  critical source of early nutrition for the bees, while others are simply looking for a meal, which I suspect is the beetle’s role here. Despite that, if you look very carefully, there is pollen stuck to this beetle too, so the plant wins after all. Everything has its role to play in nature’s cycles.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/160 sec, f/16.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
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“Photo Bugged”

“Photo Bugged”

“Don’t hide yourself from the world and don’t let the world hide himself from you!” 
― Mehmet Murat ildan

Photographing anything in or from the wild almost always offers a surprise. In this case, as I was photographing some daisies, a small beetle decided this would be a good time to come from its hiding place and see what all the commotion was about. For a while he was careful to put the stem between him and the camera, so I kept rotating the flower, but the composition was not good. Finally, he tired of the game and stayed put long enough for this image.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.8 sec, f/40.0ISO 100

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Emerald Jewelwing”

“Emerald Jewelwing”

“She glitters like she walked out of a Klimt painting”
― Jandy Nelson

I came across this Emerald Jewelwing, who was resting briefly on a leaf just below eye level. There are time where they just sit and pose for long periods, but not today. This brief pause lasted only a few seconds and it was fluttering madly about once more, in the warming air above me. It also provided me a challenge, as half of its body was shaded by a leaf, a common problem when doing nature photography, and it was not about to be moved, nor could I move the leaf over without disturbing it. So, I ended up with a less than ideal, partially shaded image, which is better than nothing at all

With a motion a bit like a butterfly, random and seemingly without direction, the jewel wings float and dart among the branches. This leads me to wonder what the purpose of this haphazard motion is? Since they are not quick, like dragonflies, I wonder if the random movement protects them from predators, it certainly makes it difficult to photograph them in flight.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/7.1 ISO 100

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Green Fly on Peony”

“Green Fly on Peony”

“Green was the silence, wet was the light,
the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”
― Pablo Neruda

As I came outside yesterday, I was filled with the sweet aroma of Peony. Our walkway is bordered by two enormous peony plant. They stand nearly five feet (just under two meters) tall and are now so big that an extra large peony ring will not hold them. I’ve taken to using rope to hold them in place. Each bush has close to fifty blossoms open at any given time and, being heirloom peonies, the fragrance is beautiful.

It rained on and off most of yesterday, yet they did not flop over too badly. The flowers, though plentiful, are not huge, so that may be a saving grace. Because of the rains, the blossoms were completely dew covered and I went inside to grab my camera to make a few photos of this morning delight.

As I was making the images, I became aware that I was not alone in enjoying these blooms. Ants, spiders and flies were active as well. This little green fly caught my eye and did not take of as I got closer to make the image. I have no idea of what type of fly it is, but it made for a pleasing image, posed on the pink dewy petals, basking in the early morning sunshine, the first day of summer.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/800 sec, f/5.0 ISO 100

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Dragonfly & Clover” – Secord Forest

“Dragonfly & Clover” - Secord Forest

“While fear depletes power, faith gives wings for the soul’s elevation.”
― T.F. Hodge

A recently hatched dragonfly, note the right side wing is not fully opened yet. It seemed because it was still not in full flight mode that it hung beneath plants, waiting for its wings to mature.

I simply liked the ‘look’ of this scene, with the dragonfly dangling beneath the clover blossom. There were dozens of dragonflies flitting around but this one was unique and the colours in the late day sun glowed with warmth.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm

1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 200

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“Brown Dragonfly” – Secord Forest

“Brown Dragonfly” - Secord Forest

“A dragonfly can spend up to several years underwater until it is strong enough to surface, shed its skin and evolve into this beautiful creature. Then it flies free among us but only for a very brief period of up to 2 months before it dies” – Unknown

I spent quite a bit of time searching for the actual name of this species, with not much luck. There are some 5,000 species of dragonflies, each distinguishes by some subtle marking, or pattern. Perhaps an insect enthusiast can enlighten me. Part of my photography discipline is learning about the subjects I photograph and I went a bit ‘bug-eyed’ looking this one up, pardon the pun.

Since upgrading my camera a few weeks ago, I have been venturing out, knowing that noise and cropping were no longer big issues to me. My Nikon D800 performs consistently in almost any lighting condition and I tend to be less timid to do close crops in post production yielding results like the dragonfly pictured above.

In the case of this well posed dragonfly, it was a matter of time waiting for one of the dozens flitting and darting around to light on the branch. It did not take long for that composition to be realized. I went for a higher aperture, to keep the entire dragonfly in focus and the light was quite good, so my ISO was not too high. I’m quite pleased with this.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm

1/60 sec, f/10.0 ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Emerald Jewelwing” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Emerald Jewelwing” - Whitevale

“Despite its dark veins, the transparency of dragonfly’s wings assures me of a pure, innocent world”
― Munia Khan

Ah, warm weather walks. As plants grow taller and spread across the forest floors, their insect companions abound and show in ever increasing displays of colour and variety. Some are tougher to photograph than others. This female emerald jewelwing, with her distinctive black body and white wing spots, is fairly common around here, but they tend to be a bit skittish with movement. This time she cooperated and posed nicely on a lime green leaf, making her stand out even more.

I have not seen many males yet. They are metallic green in colour and I’m sure they will show up shortly too.

As more wildlife begins to show itself, I’m finding myself gravitating towards it and away from plants. I hope those following my blog aren’t too disappointed?

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @300mm

1/160sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com