Tag Archives: keys

“Winter Keys”

“Winter Keys”

“We don’t realize that, somewhere within us all, there does exist a supreme self who is eternally at peace.”
― Elizabeth Gilbert

This is one of my images made the last week of December. Conditions were ideal to be out on the trails, light was soft and warm, and the temperatures were comfortable. As I was on a few week’s vacation, I spent a lot of time on the trails, enjoying the wonderful sights and sounds, making images along the way.

We’d also been blessed with what I can only refer to as “Christmas Snow”. You know, the kind of snow that falls gently and sticks to everything? Generally, this kind of snow soon melts off as the temperatures increase slightly, or get blown off the branches by wind. However, this December, the snow stuck around and remained relatively pristine.

If you follow this blog on a regular basis, you will have noticed a lot of images with white and orange subjects. This post is no exception. It’s a combination that I suppose I had not noticed before. Perhaps the unique conditions late last year made it more pronounced? Perhaps my ability to see it shifted? I’m not sure, but I am happy to see this and be able to capture it to share with you.

The image above is a bunch of maples keys, still attached to the tree. I’m not 100% sure, but given this trait, I would expect it to be a Manitoba Maple, a local variety of quick-growing, soft maples, deemed ‘weed’ trees by some. You can see the snow clinging to the delicate branches, the keys shining in the soft sunlight. It just felt very peaceful, that quiet morning not so long ago.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 180 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Glowing Keys” – Seaton Trail

“Glowing Keys” - Seaton Trail

“Let your soul stand cool and composed before a million universes.” – Walt Whitman

Like stars in a dark sky, these maple keys glowed against a shadowy forest. Lit by a late afternoon sun that seemed to spark some inner light, more than just the sunlight itself, these dried Manitoba Maple keys mesmerized me. I stood for a while, just enjoying this scene and considering ways to photograph it in a way that communicated this light effectively. It was difficult to get the angle right and minimize the artifacting that can occur when light is at an inopportune angle.

I beleive this image does justice to the show that nature provided me. I rarely notice the fine details as I’m composing the image and enjoy ‘discovering’ these little extras as I work with the final product, deatils such as the fine bent stems remaining after the keys have dropped.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Bunch of Keys” – Seaton Hiking Trail

“Bunch of Keys” - Seaton Hiking Trail

Not the most catchy title in the world, but that, essentially, is what this is. A bunch of maple keys, hanging from a tree at the Secord Trailhead. The tree was laying on its side, but I’m not sure exactly what happened to the tree to put it in its current state.

What struck me as odd, was that the keys, or seeds,  were still attached to the tree at this time of year. I would have expected them to have been released at some point earlier in the year. Maybe that has something to do with the tree being on its side or maybe it’s just the nature of this species, which I have not identified yet. The other possible answer is this bizarrely mild fall has somehow affected it. That will remain a mystery, for now.

Aside from the mystery of the keys, I was simply drawn by the glowing clusters and the fine details. It’s one of those generally mundane things we all walk past on any given day. But, if you stop and observe, it is wonderfully complex, from the veins in the key ‘wing’, to how the cluster is connected to the terminal branch. I thought it made for an interesting composition to spend some time looking at. Take a moment to see if you agree.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, @ f/5.0 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website
http://www.edlehming.com