Tag Archives: Lake Huron

“No Volleyball Today” – Sauble Beach

“No Volleyball Today” - Sauble Beach

“All human plans [are] subject to ruthless revision by Nature, or Fate, or whatever one preferred to call the powers behind the Universe.” 
― Arthur C. Clarke 

I made this image almost immediately upon my arrival at Ontario’s Sauble Beach. The forecast was for a mostly rainy weekend and our group had resigned itself that it might not be ideal for playing our favourite beach sport, volleyball.

As we drove towards the lake we were shocked by the immense waves, the like of which we had never experienced here, even during storms. After unpacking, several of us headed towards the dunes to check out the beach, which no longer existed. This is what we saw.

The combination of extremely high water levels in the Great Lakes this year coupled with steady winds directly from the west caused the water to literally stack up on the beach. You can sort of see the ‘stacking’ nearer the horizon, as the water from the deep lake hits the shallower waters of the wide beach about two hundred meters from shore. The wide, shallow sand bar acts as a buffer but the water still has to go somewhere and inevitably rolls over the sand bar and washes out the beach.

On a typical day, the beach front is about where the second row of waves is in the photo and the volleyball courts are about two meters above the lake level. On this day, expecting to miss out on volleyball due to rain, we found the courts under several centimeters of water.

The image does not effectively convey the force of the wind or the water, as the height of the waves is limited by the shallow waters, it became a high wild chop. Needless to say, it was a ‘wild’ day. So, between gale force winds and high water, there was no volleyball to be had.

By the next day, the winds had died off, the waters had receded, and as the sun warmed the ground, the beach was drying out, leaving us with pristine, flat surfaces for the rest of the weekend. A total change for this scene which greeted us on arrival.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Sauble Beach Sunset Number 3”

“Sauble Beach Sunset Number 3”

“The beauty of the unexpected lies within the surprise of the momentum,
not only at its tipping point, but also within all the moments waiting.” 
― Akilnathan Logeswaran 

Sauble Beach, on Ontario’s Lake Huron, is known for its sunsets. This one did not disappoint. It was the last day of a long weekend with friends and family. We had just finished our supper and packing the car for the drive back home, when this sight presented itself. So, I ran to the top of a dune and snapped a couple of shots with my iPhone.

It’s funny, I had spent the past two evenings on the beach photographing sunsets, each a lot different than the other. Day one was the end of a wind storm, the waves just beginning to calm, and narrow clouds stretched out across the red horizon. The next day was also filled with wispy cloud, yet the sky was filled with more pink and purple hues. I was not even thinking of a sunset on our final day, since I was occupied packing up. Yet, of the three sunsets we experienced, I enjoyed this one the most, perhaps because it came as a bit of surprise.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/950 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

“Two and Three” – Sauble Beach

“Two and Three” - Sauble Beach, Ontario

“There is so much to say about a past. It’s a vein of gold through a mountain, leading to an incontrovertible stone heart of truth. But the future is a horizon – a faintly visible line that will promise much, and always remain too far away to touch.”
― Aliya Whiteley

At first, I had no idea what to title this image. It was made at the end of another day of swimming and volleyball on the beach at Sauble. As the sun was setting, I looked at the posts and remembered the great times we had that day. That’s the “two”. On the horizon, barely visible, three boats head back to port, as the sun prepares to set, ending another glorious summer day, spend with friends and family. Today’s experiences are soon to become our past and new ones lie just beyond the horizon, in tomorrow.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/60 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“End of the Day” – Sauble beach

“End of the Day” - Sauble Beach, Ontario

“Moments never stay, whether or not you ask them, they do not care, no moment cares, and the ones you wish could stretch out like a hammock for you to lie in, well, those moments leave the quickest and take everything good with them, little burglars, those moments, those hours, those days you loved the most.”
― Catherine Lacey

My family and I spend a few relaxing days at Sauble Beach this past long weekend. Seldom does a day go by without a beautiful sunset over Lake Huron. Our weather forecast was for 4 solid days of heat and sunshine. The heat was there but the sunshine was lacking. Except at the end of the day. Each day of our stay, the sky on the horizon would clear up just enough for the sun to show through for a few minutes. I will share a few more images, but this was my favourite.

The sun had just dropped below the cloud deck and was hovering just above the horizon lighting the sky up in crimson, orange, and yellows in the brief moments before sinking out of sight.

Capturing these last few minutes can often pose a challenge as the camera sensor can make the image too bright or too dark. For me it’s that balance of showing the bright sun, yet retaining the structure of the clouds and the dark water surface.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/200sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Moments and Memories” – Sauble Beach, Ontario

“Moments and Memories” - Sauble Beach, Ontario

“Do you know how there are moments when the world moves so slowly you can feel your bones shifting, your mind tumbling? When you think that no matter what happens to you for the rest of your life, you will remember every last detail of that one minute forever?”
― Jodi Picoult

As another day ends, beach visitors gather along the shore, looking west. We stand there, taking in the final moments of the day as the sun lights up the horizon, setting the sky on fire. We drink in the cool air as a gentle breeze brushes across the water, striking our faces and cooling our skin, like the day’s final breaths. It becomes a sensory experience of sights, sounds, and smells that we tuck away to savour at some later date.

Cameras are always present as the visual memories are saved, couples walk hand in hand along the beach, sharing the experience and children dig the final scoop of sand or touch the water one last time before the beach umbrellas are packed away for the day.

I have my own feelings at this time of day, with or without my camera present, and seeing others transfixed along the shore, makes me wonder if the feeling is the same for others. What part of the panorama are they drawn too, what do they see and how do they see it?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/25 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Conflict” – Point Clarke

“Conflict” - Point Clarke, Ontario

I could not think of a better title for this photo. To me, it speaks conflict in so many forms. This day in late December was the transition from an extended mild fall to a bitter, biting winter. The crepuscular rays (yes, that’s what they are actually called), offer a sense of peace in contrast to the tumult of the icy waters below. Crepuscular rays are colloquially known as a Jacob’s Ladder, Gateways to Heaven, Buddha’s Fingers, Jesus Beams, God’s Rays, sunbeams, cloud breaks and many other names. It is not surprising that many of the names have religious connotations as crepuscular rays seem to be a message from the gods. What message is being expressed here? “Winter is coming?”

The very waters are churning in conflict, rising in sharp peaks and churning over each other, urgent for the shore.

The temperatures had dropped from a wondrous 13 degrees celsius mere days ago to a blustery minus 6 with a 60km/h wind that literally sucked the breath from my lungs and froze my fingers numb in minutes. While I love being outdoors whenever possible, this instance may be an exception, as it was truly unpleasant, except for the scene unfolding in front to me. From the comfort of a warm car or house, this may have been a vista I could have revelled at for hours.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6 @ 82mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” – Point Clarke

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” - Point Clarke

In stark contrast to the past few weeks, the final remaining days of December are reminding us that, despite the delay, the inevitable cycle of autumn to winter has continued.

The past weekend I had an opportunity to visit the shores of Lake Huron once more. I was there in January of this year and there is a significant difference. In January, the lakeshore was a wonderland of bizarre and outlandish shapes and structures, ranging for ice-volcanoes to vast sheets of clear blue ice strewn with soccer-ball sized spheres of ice, as far as the eye could see.

Due to our extremely mild fall, the lake remains ice-free, yet starkly cold looking. Yesterday, the winds came in from the North around 50 km/h with an air temperature around  minus three degrees Celsius. In the time it took to set up my tripod, the combination of damp wind from the lake and cold temperatures, had removed the feeling from my fingers. The wind howled and raged around me as I made a few photos of the Point Clarke lighthouse and the adjacent shoreline, before packing up and heading inland and out of the biting wind.

The photo above is one of several I made of this scene. I believe it captures the violent movement of the wind-whipped waves, the sale blue December sky and the brilliance of the pale white lighthouse nicely. It looks like I’m moving into winter photography mode now.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8, @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com