Tag Archives: Lake Ontario

Thursday Doors | July 27, 2017

“SV Blackjack” - Cabin Door

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“SV Blackjack” – Cabin Door

This image is quite a departure from my regular ‘doors’ images. A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to see a Tall Ship Regatta stop in the small port town of Bath, Ontario. Bath, is a small village on the south shores of Lake Ontario and made an ideal spot for these magnificent vessels to harbour for the night.

I have a very real love for sailing ships. I love the sound of rigging creaking, the snap of the sails as they fill with wind, and water sloshing against the hull. I’m a bit of romantic, picturing these ships plying the lakes and seas in bygone days. Most of the older vessels still have a lot of brass and wood on their trim and fittings, including this cabin door, though not ideally lit, it was an opportunity for me to add another door to my collection.

Though I posted images of other ships earlier this month, I’m including an image of this particular ship for your enjoyment.

Black Jack

 

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/320sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Waterfront Guardians”

“Waterfront Guardians”

“Well, best to remain vigilant. It’s when everything is calm that you need to be most alert.”
― Brandon Sanderson

Above is an image of a pair of Canada Geese, standing guard on a path leading to the shores of Lake Ontario. Those familiar with Canada Geese know that they can be very territorial, especially later in the spring, during nesting season.

I stood and watched them for a bit before approaching them. They had been standing here, barely moving for quite some time and I watched how they reacted as people approached. In the end, they simply stood their ground, the gander letting out a brief hiss of warning if anyone approached a bit too closely.

Having witnessed this, I walked past them and they barely batted an eye. On my return, they still had not moved and were still doing an excellent job at keeping visitors uneasy.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 155mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Winter’s Last Bite?”

“Winter’s Last Bite?”

“The heart can get really cold if all you’ve known is winter.”
― Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Ah!, spring in southern Ontario is, to say the least, ‘unpredictable’. This past Tuesday you could go out and enjoy the sun in a sweatshirt, the next day, a parka was needed as temperatures varied widely.

So, I reflect on this image from last weekend, made on the still frozen shores of Lake Ontario, near Whitby.

The unusual ice formations remind me of teeth and the ‘bite’ of winter. it is nice to see a few teeth missing and others dissolving as temperatures gradually rise. I’m seriously looking forward to spring and the return of warmth after a long, dark winter. In fact, we had a record set in January, with only a few days of sunlight.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/640 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Monochrome Mondays

“Final Traces”

“Painful experiences are like scars in our minds. Some have healed and been forgotten. Others are there as a reminder of what we have been through…”
― James A. Murphy,

“Final Traces”

As winter gives way to spring ‘final traces’ can be seen, reminding us of the winter that was. Not always fond reminders, but reminders, of what was, and is no more. We can chose to reflect on them, deliberately, curiously, or just leave the experience behind us, anticipating warmer days.

Pictured above is a branch sticking out of the water on the shores of Lake Ontario, with a big clump of ice still sticking to it, evidencing colder and stormy times, not so long ago.

I made the image because I envisioned it as a mono photo, the dark wood in contrast to the white of the ice. The water was multiple tones of blue and green, which translated nicely to mid-tones in the final image. There was also that element of isolation, the branch, sticking out of the water with nothing else near it. It seemed a bit unsettling, almost as if it’s reaching for the surface, trying to escape from the depths it’s currently locked into.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 116 mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cold Water Visitor”

“Cold Water Visitor”

“I am so grateful to be here on this awesome planet with its diverse life – everything we need to not just survive but to thrive. I am excited to continually learn more about it, and always curious to see what is going to come up next.”
― Jay Woodman

While photographing the Lake Ontario shore line recently, one of the thousands of Canada Geese floating offshore decided to give me a closer look. Most of the geese tend to be fairly tame, being in close proximity with humans in this area.

People and geese tend to occupy the same spaces, along the shore, in parks, and open fields. It becomes a bit of a problem when the geese get dependant on humans, who provide them food and the opportunity for food. In some parks, the geese don’t even migrate south anymore, since they have all they need. That becomes an even bigger problem when the temperatures drop, which has been fairly infrequent her in the past few years. But, deep drops in temperature can freeze even large bodies of water like Lake Ontario. We’ve had some mild winters, but extended cold spells are a game changer, sometimes leaving the geese without the open water they need.

In any case, this one wanted to get a closer look at me. I tend not to photograph the Canada Geese much, primarily because they are so commonplace around here. This one made me look again. As it emerged from the frigid waters, small drops of water glistened on its breast feathers, like small jewels in the late afternoon sun, and it posed so nicely for me, I simply could not resist the opportunity.

There’s also the small pile of melting snow to the left, a reminder that winter is not quite finished with us here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Icy Fingers of March”

“The Icey Fingers of March”

“Winter teetered on the verge of succumbing to the returning sun, but today the breeze still preferred the touch of snowflakes”
― Rue

Many miles from the tropical shores of the Sea of Cortez, which I have so fondly remembered of late, lies another shoreline. The shore of Lake Ontario. In stark contrast to the warm sands and tropical breezes of Baja, these shores, transitioning from the icy grip of winter to the milder days of spring, still show significant evidence of the extremes in temperatures the region has recently seen and the raw beauty of this magnificent lake, when conditions are right.

Just last week, temperatures plummeted and a severe winter storm passed through. The sub-zero temperatures and high winds, whipped Lake Ontario into a monster not to be trifled with. All that remains as evidence, is the otherworldly landscape along the shores. Bizarre icicles drip from the branches exposed to chilly waters, now beginning to melt as the air slowly loses its chill and the sun gradually warms the frozen shores.

This scene, like a passage into another realm, invokes thoughts of transition, from one world, frozen, yet beautiful, to another, warm and welcoming. Late afternoon light beams through the ice, lighting it, as if from within, causing it to almost glow with its own energy. The waves rolling in, are slightly warmer than the ice and begin to melt it from below.

Spring seemed so willing to move in earlier in the month, but the remainder of winter decided to make its presence known with, what we hope, is one final show. Though it may look nice in the photo, the winds coming off the lake are still cold enough to give us frozen fingers of our own, but hopefully, not for much longer.

iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8
1/640 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com