Tag Archives: layers

Iceland Journal – “Monolith” – Lómagnúpsnef, South Iceland

“Monolith” - Lómagnúpsnef, South Iceland

“It’s when rock breaks its silence that it crumbles to dust.” 
― Anthony T. Hincks

Today’s image is a closer look at the massive, dark cliff visible in yesterday’s post. This cliff, Lómagnúpsnef (nef is Icelandic for nose), dominated the horizon for a long time, ever brightening with more details emerging from the shadows as we got closer to it. There are many more details that I’m aware of, now that I’m not behind the wheel or standing along the road with my camera.

This large outcropping, which also acts as an unmovable boundary to the Skeiðarárjokull glacier, which is hidden behind the cliff’s talus slope in this image, reveals its wonderful colours and textures. The colour comes from the varied layers of basalt, which is the dark volcanic rock, and rhyolite, a pink-orange coloured volcanic rock. The difference in colour being the result of different mineral chemistry. Each layer would have been formed at a different period in time, deep underground.

The colour does not stop at the cliff itself; it continues down the slopes in tones or pink, orange and faint streaks of green.

The varied colours of this land really surprised me, since it is technically classified as tundra. I was not expecting all these bright colours, especially in the subdued late October sun, often blocked by layers of cloud.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 130mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
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“Layers of Change”

“Layers of Change”

“… as we travel again between life and death, 
Waking and dream, blinking, while layers within layers,
None better, none worse, unravel and knit up before us . . .” 
― Jay Woodman

The next image in the “Golden Paths” series, takes us a few more steps into the forest. Among the remaining greens, bright splashes of yellow, orange, and red burst among the branches. Surprisingly, for this time of year, the greens remain deep and rich, gradually fading to pale lime tones. It really looked like someone had taken a brahs and spayed colours through the air in wispy layers.

The hillside adjacent to the path is littered with a few leaves which have already fallen on the deep brown forest floor. I may have mentioned earlier, that the forest floor this years had very sparse ground cover. I believe this effect may have been caused by the unusually rainy year, which thickened the canopy above, blocking precious light from reaching the ground.

The path, bends gently, ever deeper into the forest, a progression into another season.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/10.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Fringes”

“Fringes”

“We live beneath many layers. Some are for our protection, and some are for our control.”
― Russell Eric Dobda

Generally, I stay away from ‘tight’ shots of flowers, preferring to show the entire blossom. This image is an exception. As I was composing some images of a Gerbera recently, I was really noticing the transition between the inner petals and the outer petals and how lovely that transition was. These “Fringes” pull me into the blossom, layer upon layer, each one looking like a beautiful brush stroke, each one unique, so I thought I’d share it through this image, for your consideration.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 45mm (12mm extension tube)
1 sec, f/22.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Pink Verbena”

“Pink Verbena”

“When one tunes in into nature’s frequency, life becomes change, change becomes hope!”
― Aniekee Tochukwu Ezekiel

This has been a year of change and experimentation for me. It’s all been fairly carefully thought out and exciting. I’ve experimented with new photographic techniques, such as macro photography and new ways of editing, like using some Photoshop plugins to create paintings from my photos. I also experimented with some new varieties of plants in my gardens, breaking away from my go-to plants and placing splashes of colour and multiple layers in the flower beds.

Here I managed to combine several new things into one. The image is a close up, not quite a macro, image of one of my new plants, a pink verbena. I liked how the bright pink just jumps out at me, so I decided to isolate it further, as a colour layer and kept the background back and white. I like the result. Change really can be good!

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 300 mm
1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO 720

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Coloured Ice” – Duffins Creek

“Coloured Ice” - Duffins Creek

“When you see a fish you don’t think of its scales, do you? You think of its speed, its floating, flashing body seen through the water. Well, I’ve tried to express just that. If I made fins and eyes and scales, I would arrest its movement, give a pattern or shape of reality. I want just the flash of its spirits.”  ― Constantin Brancusi

I could not believe the colours on the surface of this ice flow, beneath the surface of Duffins Creek, a small river which runs through the area where I live. I spend a lot of time, as some of my regular readers may have noticed, hiking the creek and its tributaries.

On this day, the weather shifted regularly between sun, cloud, a brief shower, and then more sun and cloud. When I made this image, a small beam of sun shone on the a section of the creek, lighting up the ice below in whites and shades of turquoise, while the sections under cloud remained various shades of green and brown. I found it a curious effect, that a small section of creek would have so much colour variation, but it was driven by the effects of the sun, sediment in the water, as well as the varying depth of the water on top of the ice, or lack of ice altogether (dark green sections in the foreground), as the creekbed showed through in some areas. The entire image looks like some abstract painting, darker than my preference, but still interesting as your eye sweeps over the photograph.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 190 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Cloud Shrouded Cliffs” – Yosemite National Park

Cloud Shrouded Clifffs - Yosemite 2013

One of my sacred places is Yosemite National Park, in California. I fell in love with this sanctuary on my first visit in 1990, when my wife and I were just starting to date and I have returned several times since.

The sheer vastness and majesty of this place is difficult to describe. There are literally millions of photos taken here, as other visitors try to capture a fragment in time but few images can do this place justice.

The appearance of the valley, high in the Sierra Nevada, is constantly changing. Between seasons, time of day, and location. The light is almost fluid and, in my limited experience here, the same view rarely repeats itself. We are offered mere ‘moments’ to carry in our images and memories as we journey here.

A case in point is the image above, which was made in May 2013, my most recent visit to Yosemite. It was a cool and misty day, with of and on rain showers and brief intervals of sunshine. The cliffs pictures are just above Currie Village and just right of Upper Yosemite Falls, which were obscured by clouds when this image was made.

The movement of the clouds among the rocks and trees high above the valley was magical as the jagged granite cliffs would reveal themselves and then vanish like revenants behind the next billow. Each wave of mist would reveal, then obscure some new layer, then, like an ethereal set change, it would be gone again, replaced by something completely different and marvellous. I could have spent the whole day transfixed by this phenomenon and never seen the same combination twice.

I was fortunate to capture this image that reveal several layers as well as the raw beauty of the tree topped cliffs. I’m going to return to my beloved park sometime soon to see what further magic it has to offer me.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-300 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Poplars on the Trail” – Secord Forest Trail

“Poplars on the Trail” - Secord Forest Trail

Back in October, I spent quite a bit of my free time on the local trails, enjoying the mild fall, spectacular colours, and some quiet time to just appreciate the stillness of the forest.

At one point on the Secord Forest trail, the path runs through a large group (or stand) of poplars. I’ve tried on a few occasions to photograph them in a way that shows the interesting texture of the tree trunks and a sense of uncertainty, as the narrow path weaves into the distance between the many trees. You can’t see very far ahead at this point in the trail because of how the poplars block your view.

When viewed in colour, there are a lot of distractions caused by the bright leaves and grasses. So, I thought I’d try this as a black and white. I’m very pleased at how the textures really stand out, the ‘layering’ of the seemingly endless rows of trees fading into the background, as well as how the path between them is not obvious, which was my intent. The image is surprisingly stark, but I like the effect.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm

1/100 sec, f/5.0 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website
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