Tag Archives: learning

“Rusty Shores”

 

“Beneath the rust and grime which dulls the shine of our weathered hearts, joy patiently waits to be rediscovered” 
― John Mark Green

For my photography, image titles often come quite easily. As I venture into the world of acrylic painting, I’m finding that that’s not the case. Perhaps it’s the extended creation process, where I am spending a longer period of time creating the art itself?

Photos come naturally to me. I see a scene before me that is interesting, compose the image, set lighting, exposure and depth of field, and voila! I have a photo that I am generally pleased with.

The same holds true with painting. There is a lot of thought that goes into the process that I had not considered until I started painting a few short years ago and I have not been doing much lately. But now, I have taken a course and understand that the creative process is very similar and all the elements that make a good photo also hold true for painting.

I’ve always enjoyed impressionist paintings and have striven for that same feel with my photos. Now, I’m trying to merge the two, simply to stay creative, especially in winter months where outdoor activity can be quite limited. So, I’ve pushed myself a bit, trying to add some texture to my work by doing an entire painting with a palette knife, way out of my comfort zone, but so very satisfying.

Once again, I remind myself this is my photo blog, but I think that painting is helping me in my creative process for photography and this is, after all, a photo of a painting.

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“Water Avens – geum rivale”

“Water Avens - geum rivale”

“A capacity, and taste, for reading, gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others. It is the key, or one of the keys, to the already solved problems. And not only so. It gives a relish, and facility, for successfully pursuing the [yet] unsolved ones.”
― Abraham Lincoln

This one is a new plant for me. While hiking on Sunday, I caught a brief flash of burgundy a short distance off the trail, from the corner of my eye. As I looked from a distance, I could not make out what I was looking at. So, I decided to step off the trail to investigate.

My first step into the trail put me ankle-deep in water, which I was not aware of. I then proceeded carefully, stepping from log to log, approaching this cluster of unknown plants. It’s yet another of those, “How did I not notice theses before?”, moments. How did I not notice that the trail was also paralleled by water, beneath the undergrowth? Perhaps it has to do with the exceptional amount of rainfall we’ve had over the past several weeks. Perhaps, this water-loving plant only grows in particularly wet years?

Setting up my tripod enabled me to make several images of this wonderful and mysterious plant, though I was still challenged to get a good, sharp image, by an ever-present breeze, even at a fairly high ISO.

On my return home, I followed my routine of reviewing the images and trying to identify the plants. I could not find it at first, but after flipping through a few books and internet resources, I finally identified it as Water Avens, which now makes perfect sense to me, given that it was growing in water!

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/20 sec, f/10.0 ISO 800

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Breach” – Chileno Beach

Breach at Chileo

“Every now and then one paints a picture that seems to have opened a door and serves as a stepping stone to other things.”
― Pablo Picasso

Though this is my photo blog I have, recently, posted a few paintings. Actually, they are photos of paintings, so I’m really not crossing a line, am I?

As those of you who follow this blog regularly would know, I’ve commented in the past about the idea that I can’t paint, and that I have used digital painting as a proxy for this deficit. However, those digital paintings stirred something inside me to give painting a try. It was a big risk on my part. What if I proved myself right? Well, no harm in trying.

I was surprised to find that something that sat dormant for so long could be so easily awakened, simply by listening to my inner voice and a bit of preparation. I went out and bought some good quality paints and an assortment of brushes and really surprised myself. It has been a LONG time since I put brush to canvas and I never really enjoyed it, because I was just not good at mixing colours.

Time, and experience with photo composition and colour balance has taught me why my colours were off and a few online beginner courses in acrylic painting technique made me somewhat ready to try it again.

My recent whale watching trip and subsequent photos inspired me to attempt a painting of the whales breaching. So, here it is. I believe I have a long way to go to get my paintings to the level I desire, but I’m not disappointed in the result. This is my third painting since I started in mid-February.

“Shine”

“Shine”

“To shine your brightest light is to be who you truly are.”
― Roy T. Bennett

Shine, it’s what they do, is it not? On another gray winter day, I enjoy being able to create these images and hopefully, brighten others’ days as well. Creating these studio images of flowers has become almost second nature to me. They are so enjoyable to make and then look at, long after the flowers have wilted and withered away, and I wonder why I had not done this before.

Then the answer comes. It was not till I got involved in a Cee Neuner photo challenge back in the summer that got me focused on “Isolation” that I had even considered doing this kind of work. Oh yes, I made a lot of mistakes along the way, but once I had figured it out, it be came easy to create these images both in the studio and in the outdoors. So, I hope you enjoy this bit of “Shine” in your day. A special thanks to Cee and my fellow photographers for the inspiration to try something new.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 35 mm (with 20mm extension tube)
2.0 sec, f/25.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Pink Gerbera”

“Pink Gerberia”

“Nobody sees a flower – really – it is so small it takes time – we haven’t time – and to see takes time, like to have a friend takes time.”
― Georgia O’Keeffe

Today is a dull, grey day here. One of those days where it can’t figure out whether to rain or snow. So, what better way to brighten it up than with a flower.

I spent a bit of time in the studio yesterday, pulling apart a fresh bouquet and photographing the individual blossoms. The marvel of modern times is that fresh summer blooms are readily available year round.

With this bloom, I found myself really enjoying the pale yellow halo at the base of the petals and the way it glowed with its own light. I played with various exposure settings and finally settled on the one that showed off that effect, without softening the details too much.

I’m still getting used to using my extender tubes, as I don’t have a good macro lens in my bag yet, but that is on the horizon.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 35 mm (with 20mm extension tube)
2.0 sec, f/25.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Begonia Close Up”

begonia-close-up

“Let the colours of your ideas be red so that all can easily notice them! And what is red? Red is a scream, red is power, red is assertion!”
― Mehmet Murat Ildan

A bit of a journey into the world of macro photography today. I’m still getting the hang of it but enjoying the results. This red begonia blossom is part of a floral display along the main street in my town. I was walking by and noticed them, immediately wanting to capture and image. It’s a less than perfect specimen, but beautiful nonetheless.

Needless to say, I will have to go back and try again. Stay tuned 🙂

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm with 20mm macro extender
10 sec, f/16.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Annabelle Hydrangea”

Annabelle Hydrangea

“One passionate heart can brighten the world. From person to person the chain reaction burns through us — setting heart to heart ablaze, and lighting the way for us all!”
― Bryant McGill

Here I am at photo four of this expanding project “Ordinary Flower in a Different Light”. Today’s subject is an Annabelle Hydrangea from our front garden.

This incredible flowering shrub is quite the sight when fully in bloom. Some of the blossoms become so large that the stem can’t bear the weight and they fold over. Those blossoms are often cut off and brought inside for us to enjoy as a centrepiece floral arrangement.

The hydrangea was a bit more of a challenge to photograph as the bright white flowers dominate the image and make it more of a challenge to get all the elements balanced. I’m still learning and adjusting camera settings as I go, but this is the best of the lot.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 92 mm
1/100 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (most images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com