Tag Archives: maple

“Almost Ready for Summer”

“Almost Ready for Summer”

“Preparations are underway, chlorophyll fills the cells, rust turns to green, and leaves mature, ready to feed hungry trees, and produce oxygen.”
– Ed Lehming

Spring is truly underway when the slight yellow and rusty new growth turns deep green. As the leaves develop, the emergent colours fade, ever so slowly, except to those who are with them regularly.

The cycle continues, largely unnoticed by most these days, but when you spend time with the trees this conversion to mature leaves is a wonderful process to observe.

In the image above, faints patches of the former dark reds, which were so prevalent a few days ago, are still visible but are being replaced by the summer greens. As days get longer and the air warms up, each species in its time will be preparing to greet another summer.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/250 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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Thursday Doors | June 08, 2017

"Abandoned"

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Abandoned”

This image is a far departure from my usual images of stately, ornate doors, yet they are still doors and I found them quite intriguing.

As I was out hiking earlier this year, I came across an abandoned maple sap evaporator, sitting in the middle of a mature forest. It seemed so out-of-place that I had to make a photo of it to show to friends and thought Thursday Doors might be another place to share it.

For those unfamiliar with maple syrup production, the ‘sap’, which is a sweet, watery liquid produced by Sugar Maple trees, is gathered, either in buckets attached to the trees or, for more modern facilities, via a ‘pipeline’ of plastic hoses, and boiled down in an ‘evaporator’, like this one (but not full of holes). A large fire is kept going under the evaporator to boil off most of the water in the maple sap. The remaining syrup, is then further boiled in a smaller finishing tank. At the end of the process, the maple syrup, is about 1/40th the volume of the original sap. So, it takes a lot of sap to produce even a small amount of syrup. This boiling process occurs late February to early March, just as days begin to warm and the sap rises into the tree, which requires cold nights and days above freezing. The cycle usually runs for just over a week.

So, I look at this image and can imagine someone, in days gone by, harvesting the sap and boiling it here in the forest. The tank would likely have been covered or enclosed in a large ‘sugar shack’ to protect the producer from the elements and keep foreign matter from surrounding trees from falling into the evaporator.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/50 sec, f/10.0 ISO 200

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Diaphanous”

“Diaphanous”

“Time leaches the colors from the best of visions. The world becomes grayer. Entropy beats us down. Everything fades. Everything goes. Everything dies.”
― Robert Silverberg

Back outdoors again, in the midst of a January thaw, too much of a thaw, actually. As I set out on the trails, expecting ice, which I was prepared for, I was faced with deep, slushy, wet snow, tough to walk in and impossible to grip, even with my ice cleats. It made for a fairly exhausting hike, but I was determined to complete my usual five kilometer loop today and make some photos along the way, if they offered themselves.

The day started out moody, dull, and foggy, which inspired me to get out to photograph for of this atmosphere, but by the time I drove to my destination, the fog had dissipated, so I proceeded to hike.

Mild temperatures and showers over the past few days had knocked many of the last remaining leaves to the ground and they rested on the grainy, wet snow. An interesting effect of the moisture and changing temperatures was that many of them seemed very ‘thin’, diaphanous, as they littered the snowy forest floor, slowly decaying. The snow itself was not a pure white either, rather, spotted with particles of dirt and dust which had accumulated so far this winter. I would have prefered a pure white background, but the spots enhance the image a bit by showing through the leaf.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Winter Keys”

“Winter Keys”

“We don’t realize that, somewhere within us all, there does exist a supreme self who is eternally at peace.”
― Elizabeth Gilbert

This is one of my images made the last week of December. Conditions were ideal to be out on the trails, light was soft and warm, and the temperatures were comfortable. As I was on a few week’s vacation, I spent a lot of time on the trails, enjoying the wonderful sights and sounds, making images along the way.

We’d also been blessed with what I can only refer to as “Christmas Snow”. You know, the kind of snow that falls gently and sticks to everything? Generally, this kind of snow soon melts off as the temperatures increase slightly, or get blown off the branches by wind. However, this December, the snow stuck around and remained relatively pristine.

If you follow this blog on a regular basis, you will have noticed a lot of images with white and orange subjects. This post is no exception. It’s a combination that I suppose I had not noticed before. Perhaps the unique conditions late last year made it more pronounced? Perhaps my ability to see it shifted? I’m not sure, but I am happy to see this and be able to capture it to share with you.

The image above is a bunch of maples keys, still attached to the tree. I’m not 100% sure, but given this trait, I would expect it to be a Manitoba Maple, a local variety of quick-growing, soft maples, deemed ‘weed’ trees by some. You can see the snow clinging to the delicate branches, the keys shining in the soft sunlight. It just felt very peaceful, that quiet morning not so long ago.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 180 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Maple, with a Twist”

“Maple, with a Twist”

“And just because you turn out differently than everyone’s imagined you would doesn’t mean that you’ve failed in some way. A person who goes to med school because his entire family is full of doctors might find out that what he really wants to be is an artist instead.”
― Jodi Picoult

Here’s another image from yesterday’s hike. I’m always impressed at how some plants hang on to their leaves when neighbouring plants, of the same species, have dropped theirs. They are somehow  marvelously different, unexpected. Despite rains, heavy winds, and snowfall, this small maple hung onto a singular leaf. It almost appears as if the snow is trying to push the leaf off. yet it endures, at least long enough to fall into my sight. On even the dullest day, I come across these ‘exceptions’ and they brighten my day, because they are unexpected.

The twisty vine in this image is from an invasive species called Dog Strangling Vine, which grows in abundance here and is, despite being invasive, a delicate and interesting plant to photograph. I wrote about it earlier this year.

The combination of the leaf and the vine lead to the image title, yet another image of orange and white, much like yesterday’s post and a few prior to that. At some point, even the bright orange will fade into memory, the way yellow did a month ago.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/50 sec, f/3.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The End of Yellow”

“The End of Yellow”

“The yellow glistens.
It glistens with various yellows,
Citrons, oranges and greens
Flowering over the skin.”
― Wallace Stevens

Good bye, for the season, yellow. Now that December has arrived, there are simply no more traces of bright, sunshine yellow. In autumn, the leaves progressed from crimson, to pinks, oranges and browns, and through it all, there was always a trace of yellow. Be it from birch, maple, or tamarack, there was always yellow to be found somewhere. At times, the entire forest was aglow with yellow, whole sections of the forest floor carpeted in this bright cheerful colour.

Suddenly, it’s gone. I’m not talking the muted remains, now fading to murky brown or gray. I’m talking about the pure, bold, eye-catching, light up my world yellows. So I reflect back to a day, not so distant, when I found a grove of maple trees that were in their full yellow glory. I looked up through the branches and leaves which filtered the autumn sunlight to a warming glow. I made the image above to document that moment, even as they began to show a change, prior to falling.

Today, I’m happy to reflect back on this image, recalling the warmth of the sun on my face and the sheer joy of standing in this place, surrounded by the brilliant maples, soaking up the colour, knowing that it would eventually transition, as the cycle continues and the world prepares to sleep, for a while.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 145 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Visions of Autumn – Orange Maple”

“Visions of Autumn - Orange Maple”

“And that afternoon, as the sun slanted low through the changing autumn leaves, I remembered to savor the moment, soak in the beauty, breathe deeply and feel the immensity of God.”
― Cindee Snider Re

The next component to nature’s fall palette around here is orange. Interestingly, when I got closer to this branch for a bright orange maple tree, I found a surprising amount of green and yellow, with patches of red and orange. The result, when viewed from a distance is a blazing orange.

This tree, in it’s entirety, can be seen in a post I made of few days ago (it’s the large tree near the back of the group).

I’m quite enjoying this study series and hoping the colours don’t fade before I can build a good collection of images. Bt with autumn, we can only hang on for so long and then it’s gone. I’m hoping for an extension like we had last year. Fingers crossed.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1 .3 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com