Tag Archives: moments

“One Last Look”

“One Last Look”

“Nature’s gifts are always fleeting. These moments must be savoured while we can, and then the moment is gone, leaving only fond memories and dreams for tomorrow.” – Ed Lehming

Alas, the final days of the wake-robin are at hand. These flowers which have brought me so much joy this summer are fading fast, with only a few intact specimens remaining. What the sun has not dried and the wind and rain (and snow) have not pummeled, slugs have scarred.

I recall only ten days ago, seeing and photographing the first few blossoms to emerge on a rainy, sleet filled day. At the time, they were among the only blossoms brave enough to open on that cold spring day. But now, the sun is rising every higher and white trilliums dominate the landscape. I looked along the path for an intact flower, for one last photo, knowing that by tomorrow they will all be gone.

I’ve really enjoyed the wake-robins this year, more than others. They have been plentiful and I’ve been able to get good images through a combination of good fortune and getting down low to the ground with my tripod. The light has been exceptional, with a few slightly overcast days providing me ideal conditions. Today was quite a bit brighter but I was able to find this blossom on the edge of the shadows, just enough so that the image is not overly harsh. I also wanted to make sure that all the petals were in sharp focus, so I used a very narrow aperture, higher ISO, and slower shutter speed to get me what I was after.

So, here it is, the final blossom, so I can enjoy one last look.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/100 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cozumel Dreamtime”

“Cozumel Dreamtime” “Someday we will look back on this moment and it will forever remind us to never take the little things for granted. It will remind us to hug with all our hearts, to pause to appreciate holding someone’s hand, and to live in the moments that we are surrounded by others.”
– Laura Jones

In the past few days I have found myself spending an inordinate amount of time going through recent photos. The photos I am spending more time with lately are not the images I use for my art, but rather photos that include my travels with friends and family. 

I’m looking at them more deliberately now. What were at the time simple travel snapshots, trying to quickly capture a moment, are now more precious. There are details in these simple images that make me smile. 

I chose this image of a Cozumel sunset from last January. Even though there are no people visible in the image  at the time I made the photo, I was in the company of much of my family and close friends as we gathered on the beach to watch the closing of the day. This simple moment was so enjoyable for us. As I look at the photo, I can hear the voices and the laughter and sense the joy we all shared together. It was a moment of shared peace, a moment when the entire world stood still, a moment of connectedness.

In the current situation, with its lockdowns and isolation, it’s these moments that stand out the most and the ones I hope to revisit in the not too distant future. For now, I will revel in the images and the memories they hold.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/340 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Golden Moments”

“Golden Moments”

“Do you know how there are moments when the world moves so slowly you can feel your bones shifting, your mind tumbling? When you think that no matter what happens to you for the rest of your life, you will remember every last detail of that one minute forever?”
― Jodi Picoult

As I mentioned on a previous post, I had the opportunity this past weekend to get back on the trails, spend some time with my son, and make more photos.

In several aspects, we experienced ‘Golden Moments”. The soft autumn sunlight made both the canopy and forest floor glow with golden light, trees cast long, yet barely noticeable shadows on the ground, and we had a great time discussing photography, light, and composition.

My son is in his third year of university for film making and has a great sense for all of the above and is quite a talented photographer as well, yet he sees thing slightly differently from me, which has been a great learning experience for both of us, as we walk and discuss what and how we are seeing the scenes around of us.

Often he will see something that did not catch my eye and vice versa. The joy in this is that we are both able to communicate well what that ‘something’ is. Then the other will see it as well. I found this has expanded my art as a photographer significantly.

After all, if I can’t understand how others may see my work, then I believe I’m not fully communicating my vision.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 78 mm
1/80 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Edge of the Marsh” – Peterson Road, Maynooth

“Edge of the Marsh” - Peterson Road, Maynooth

“This life is yours. Take the power to choose what you want to do and do it well. Take the power to love what you want in life and love it honestly. Take the power to walk in the forest and be a part of nature. Take the power to control your own life. No one else can do it for you. Take the power to make your life happy.”
― Susan Polis Schutz

This is another recent image I made while stopped at the roadside of Peterson Road, near Maynooth, Ontario. The road itself has a long history, being a primary connector between several of Ontario’s small towns and serving as a southern entrance to Algonquin Park and the start of many a cone trip into the park.

I made this image because it is such a typical scene in central Ontario, with its many lakes and even more numerous marshes. It’s the scene most people speed by on their way to the cottage to ‘enjoy nature’. Yet, they have passed by the very nature they claim to be getting back to. Forgive me if this sounds judgemental, it’s not intended to be. It’s something I have done so many time myself.

So, I offer you here, as small moment, frozen in time, to consider as you pass by it. Look deep into the scene, breath its life, and simply savour the abundance of beauty we all too often take for granted.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/125 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Graduation Rose”

“Graduation Rose”

“It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside.”
― Maud Hart Lovelace

A few days ago, I had the great pleasure of attending my youngest daughter’s High School graduation. It seems another chapter in our lives has drawn to a conclusion and another begins.

As a gift for her graduation, her boyfriend gave her a beautiful bouquet of roses, including these wonderful pinks. Of course, the photographer in me sees more than just the flowers, they are a subject to be studied and photographed. The image above is the result.

It will be nice to have this keepsake, long after the beauty of the real roses eventually fades and is gone. Another moment captured.

The other fun fact about this photo is that I used one of my dad’s old Pentax M42 mount lenses with an adaptor and extension tubes to make this image. A bit of history to achieve the image I had envisioned. At f/1.9 it’s a wonderfully fast 50mm prime lens with great optics. I have not used it since I inherited my dad’s Spotmatic 37 years ago. I’m looking forward to using it more in future projects.

Nikon D800
Schneider-Kreuznach Exida-Xenon 50mm f/1.9 @ 50mm (14mm extension tube)

1/60 sec, f/1.9, ISO 2200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“White Spotted Butterfly” – Secord Forest

“White Spotted Butterfly” 0 Secord Forest

“Only when we pay attention and notice small moments, do we make the connections that lead to a change in our perspective.”
― Andrea Goeglein

It’s pretty amazing what you see over a 5km forest hike, especially in a forest as diverse as Secord Forest. Which, fortunately for me, is only a few kilometers from my home, which makes it a super convenient place to go, without a lot of preparation.

Back to the woods, as it were. I’ve gone there a few times over the past few weeks, constantly amazed at how fast the forest goes from its brown, dead, winter form, to a verdant explosion of life and ongoing cycle of growth, blooms, and thriving wildlife.

Lately, with all the blossoming flowers, butterflies have been bountiful. I must admit, that I had no idea just how many different species are native to these woods. I am familiar with the common varieties, like Monarchs, Mourning Cloaks, and the multitude of Coppers and Skippers. Yet, there are vast numbers of tiny butterflies that barely catch your attention, till you stand and watch for movement between the plants.

This specimen eluded my attempts at a photograph for quite some time, but I finally got a good image of its spectacular colours. It’s so small, about the size of a thumbnail, that I did not notice the bright yellow shoulder patches till I looked at the image on my computer. I did spend a bit of time looking up the actual name, but among thousands of butterfly species, I finally gave up and simply named it by its appearance. If there are  butterfly enthusiasts out there who can enlighten me on the species, that would be greatly appreciated.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/180 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Coltsfoot Seed Heads” – Uxbridge

“Coltsfoot Seed Heads” - Secord Forest Trail

“Life is not made up of minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years, but of moments. You must experience each one before you can appreciate it.” 
― Sarah Ban Breathnach

As with its yellow blossoms, many people mistake the coltsfoot seed heads for those of the dandelion. That is, until you take the time to look closer.

I’m finding more and more that people are just not taking the time to actively participate in the world around them. If something can’t be observed quickly or looked up on-line, it gets left behind. Our natural world beckons us to be part of it. When I take hikes to make photos, my world slows down, the business of life slips away, and I can be ‘in’ nature, not just a silent observer. The sounds fill my ears, the smells trigger memories, and the ever changing light dances through my vision. Some call this living in the moment, and I like that term, because that ‘moment’ lasts only briefly and then, becomes memory.

One of my greatest satisfactions in making photos is that all the images I make represent ‘moments’ which I have borne witness to. I take that as a gift, especially if I am able to effectively convey the ‘feeling’ of that moment through my art.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The Cauldron” – Duffins Creek

“The Chauldron” - Duffins Creek

“Let us simmer over our incalculable cauldron, our enthralling confusion, our hotchpotch of impulses, our perpetual miracle – for the soul throws up wonders every second. Movement and change are the essence of our being; rigidity is death; conformity is death; let us say what comes into our heads, repeat ourselves, contradict ourselves, fling out the wildest nonsense, and follow the most fantastic fancies without caring what the world does or thinks or says. For nothing matters except life.” – Virginia Woolf

The title came to me instantly, as I watched this natural cauldron with fascination, as the water boiled and seethed, like a living being, clawing upwards, through a fissure in the surrounding ice, it’s only escape from the pressure below.
You see, the rapid thaw generally ran across the ice of Duffins Creek, this February afternoon, but in some places, the water was forced beneath heavy sheets of ice, with nowhere to go. The pressure built and built till a small imperfection the ice offered an escape. This hole became that escape. It was the only opening in the ice for several hundred yards and the water seemed to literally boil forth. The hole must have been there for a while, as a frozen ‘lip’ or ‘fringe’ formed around the edges, catching the sunlight and glowing from within, making the scene that much more captivating. The surrounding ice looks like it’s loosing structure and I’m sure the phenomenon did not last long, but I did not have the opportunity to return later in the day.
This is yet another of those temporary moments where nature reveals a small part of her wonder in the most ordinary places. Nature throws up her wonders by the second and I’m happy to partake as often as I can.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 135mm
1/8 sec, f/32, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Into the Forest, Darkly” – Walkers Woods, Uxbridge

“Into the Forest Darkly” - Walkers Woods, Uxbridge

I find myself going back to my photo abstractions frequently. They bring me great pleasure, in that I never know quite how they will turn out. Don’t get me wrong, these are very deliberate photos, and I have a vision in my mind of the outcome. But, the random elements; light, speed, colours, and focus, all add their own unexpected twist to the final composition.

Case in point with the image above, I can see the scene very clearly and it lends itself well to a vertical pan. What I can’t predict, at least not yet, is what the effect of random branches across tree trunks, background reflections, and ambient light might have on the whole photo. I saw the branch across the tree in the forefront, but had no idea how the soft green leaves might play in the whole image.

This image was the result of a quick lunchtime excursion to a local conservation area. I just needed to walk among the trees. Being in nature is the place where I can really experience ‘living in the moment’. For some time, I was not sure what that expression meant. Apparently, this is a rare gift in our fast paced world. In the woods, the outside world melts away, and I am at peace. There is only me and only this place exists to me, at this moment. This place becomes my world and what is beyond is of no consequence. So, I am grateful for the ability to capture those moments that captivate me, while i’m in the moment, and share them. Hopefully, this image will resonate with others.

I called named the image “Into the Woods, Darkly” because  of all the dark spaces I saw below the trees, even thought the sky was bright. The photo technique brings all the dark places into the light, which I found interesting.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec @ f/16, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Bronze Fish”

“Bronze Fish” - by artist Jean Horne - Canadian National Exh

I love fine details and textures. It’s especially those little details I notice after having walked by something dozens of times and I find myself wondering, “Why did I not notice that earlier?”

One of the joys of photography is being able to capture those moments and reflect on them later. Above is a bronze statue of fish outside the Food Building at the Canadian National Exhibition. I’ve been going to the “EX” since I was a kid, and spent a fair amount of time inside the food building. In that time, I suppose that I have never exited via the west-facing doors? Not sure, but I certainly never noticed this interesting statue by Jean Horne. It has a very Art Deco look and I like how it’s installed over a small reflecting pool. How many other have walked past this statue and never noticed it? It is incredible, in  our busy world, how we can miss so much. I’m just happy to be able to slow it down for a moment, to enjoy that moment, and to be able to take it with me, as a photo.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-2000mm @ 80mm
1/250 sec @ f/8, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming