Tag Archives: movement

“Who Has Seen the Wind?”

“Who Has Seen the Wind?”

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair” 
― Kahlil Gibran

The earth does delight in our bare feet and the trail rises ahead to greet me. I’ve spent the past couple of weekends back on the local trails, enjoying the fresh air and sound of the wind shaking the branches high above me, the air is filled with birdsong  and the scent of tree sap.

One of the things I try to communicate through my abstract photography is that the forest is a living breathing thing, it’s seldom still and especially so on windy days. Last weekend, as I was making a series of images on the trail, a gust of wind caught me, just as I snapped the shutter. I make these images freehand, as I like the natural feel and control I have of the creative process. The effect of this ‘gust’ was a very slight shift in the first portion of the my upward sweep, which at first bothered me, but the more I considered the final image, the more I liked it. The movement is a bit more distorted but adds a different axis of movement, caused by the wind which seems to make the whole scene spring to action, as if rustling in that same breeze. It’s like witnessing a deep exhalation of the forest, for a brief moment, and then it all settles back to the norm.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Jolt”

“Jolt”

“If you are a dreamer come in
If you are a dreamer a wisher a liar
A hoper a pray-er a magic-bean-buyer
If you’re a pretender com sit by my fire
For we have some flax golden tales to spin
Come in! 
Come in!” 
― Shel Silverstein

The title for this image came fairly readily. I was out making photos with my son and he was on a hillside on the path ahead of me, shooting some low angle shots of the surrounding forest. As he stood up, it shot a deliberate horizontal pan of him, backlit by the early autumn colours. The result was, to me, magical. A sensory jolt, as I distilled his shape among the light trails.

It’s a single, unprocessed image. The background light casting his form into shadow, as the brightness of the forest colours surrounds him like something magical and filled with energy. Of the several images I made that warm autumn day, this is the one I wanted to process first, since it fairly jumped from my camera’s preview display. It’s dreamlike and filled with energy, peaceful, yet subtly sinister. I like that in an image. It conveys multiple moods and energies in a single image.

The only real issue I had in producing the image was to stop the camera down sufficiently to prevent blowing out the back ground. Since I did not have a neutral density filter with me, which would be my go-to, I accomplished it through setting my ISO to the  L1.0 setting, a full stop below the lowest ISO of 100. Anything for the shot.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/9.0, ISO 50 (L1.0)

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Chickadee in Flight”

“Chickadee in Flight”

“Let your boys test their wings. They may not be eagles, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t soar free.”
― C.J. Milbrandt

This image was a surprising treat for me. I had been photographing a chickadee perching on some cattails along a local pond. As with many small birds, they tend to be a bit skittish and fast moving. This one seemed to be quite content but suddenly took to flight. I hit the shutter a split second after it took off. Thinking I had missed it, I proceeded to make a few other photos before going home.

When I got home and reviewed my images, this one startled me. Where I was expecting a frame filled with out of focus cattails, I found this wonderful image of the chickadee in flight and looking quite determined. The slight motion blur enhances the experience for me, accenting the motion of the quickly beating wings.

I probably could not have planned for this any better, especially considering that I had only my macro lense with me. My one saving grace was that I had set my shutter speed high to freeze the twitchy movement of the chickadee feeding in the first place. Sometime things just work out.

Also, shooting with my D800 made it possible to crop the original (see below), significantly, to get his composition."Chickadee in Flight" original

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/1600 sec, f/2.8, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Tuesdays of Texture – Week 14

“Frozen Movement”

“Frozen Movement”

“Dream delivers us to dream, and there is no end to illusion. Life is like a train of moods like a string of beads, and, as we pass through them, they prove to be many-colored lenses which paint the world their own hue. . . . ”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 14 of 2017.

Please excuse the contradictory title of this image, but that is how I saw it. The frozen surface of the Lynde Shores Marsh, its protective coating of snow, blown away, looked just like waves, frozen in time.

Though the surface is quite smooth, patches of melted and refrozen snow, add bright highlights, small cracks and imperfections are slightly darker or lighter, depending on their nature. When viewed in isolation, without context, this could be gently rolling waves on a tropical sea, but is in reality, far from it.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 210mm
1/250sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Against the Odds”

"Against the Odds" - Duffins Creek

“When you do or think or feel something, do it with passion. Let it come from the heart. Put your heart and soul in it. And when you do, you will feel a river flowing sweetly through you and especially through your entire life. Life has much more meaning that way. ”
― Angie Karan

A painterly image I made yesterday, based on a photo of two trout swimming upstream at the Whitevale bridge, north of Pickering, Ontario.

What struck me was how the body of the dark fish flowed with the water, or did the water flow with the fish? As I processed the image, the flow of colour, from warm orange tones and larger river rocks at the bottom to cooler blue tones and multi-coloured pebbles at the top began to become more noticeable, yet the dark body of the fish dominates the scene. The entire image speaks of movement, energy, and overcoming. I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Morning Light at Burleigh Falls”

“Morning Light at Burleigh Falls”

“Water that never moves.” I say to him. “It’s fine for a little while. You can drink from it and it’ll sustain you. But if it sits too long it goes bad. It grows stale. It becomes toxic.” I shake my head. “I need waves. I need waterfalls. I want rushing currents.”
— Tahereh Mafi

I’ve always enjoyed moving water and photographing it. I gain energy from it, as the quote above says so well, still water is fine for a while, but eventually it stagnates. Like the water, though it’s tempting to live in the calm, life is about movement and change, wheather by choice or circumstance.

Earlier this week I saw a Facebook post from a fellow photographer who had visited this beautiful chute mid week. I was astounded, looking at the posted photo, by the sheer volume of water rushing through the channel between Stoney Lake and Lower Buckhorn Lake in central Ontario’s Kawartha Region. We did not have much snow this past winter but despite this, the waters of the feeder lakes had overwhelmed the control dam above the Falls.

Needless to say, I had to check it out myself, on my way to Bancroft, where I show my photographs at a artist co-op called A Place for the Arts.

I arrived at the falls around 9:15 am and the light for the east was stunning, lighting up the water and the opposite shore. I took some time and made a few photos, with the intention of returning late afternoon, on my way back home. The image above is from my morning visit and I’ll post a few more at a later date from my afternoon stop, which was equally impressive.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Undercut” – Duffins Creek at Whitevale

“Undercut” - Duffins Creek at Whitevale

“A river seems a magic thing. A magic, moving, living part of the very earth itself.”
― Laura Gilpin

A few mere weeks ago, this entire scene was filled with ice and snow. A handful of mild days, and it’s all a memory, preserved and recalled in thoughts and photos.

Since I don’t live in an area with high mountains and grand vistas, I take great pleasure in long hikes along the local creeks and through forest paths. Moving water, especially in the form of creeks, cascades, and rapids, holds a special fascination to me. I love the way it moves, how the light plays in the currents and eddies. The water courses themselves are alive and always a bit different every time I visit. There’s a new log on the banks, winter ice has rearranged the rocks on the bottom, sediment has accumulated and changed the course, ever so slightly.

The scene above, would be typical of an April day along the creek, as the spring runoff concludes and the sediment levels decrease, the creek becomes clearer and the rainbow trout begin their annual run to spawn. But, this is March and the trout are not quite ready, but the water awaits, cold and clear. The coltsfoot and bloodroot will begin to bloom, signalling the start of the run. I imagine, if the air stays mild, that will be within the next few days and I look forward to seeing life returning to this magical place.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 95 mm
1/10 sec, f/22, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com