Tag Archives: movement

“Creekbed Ripples”

“Creekbed Ripples”

“Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world’s great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of the rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.
I am haunted by waters.” ― Norman Maclean

The above, is one of my favourite quotes. it simply resonates with me on a very profound level and I’m pleased to be able to start articulating those feelings through my images.

How often have you sat by a stream, calmed by the gently flowing water and the dance of light below the surface? I find myself taking these simple moments for granted. As I walk through the woods through the forest, I cross many streams, each unique in their character. Some are deep, dark and cool, others shallow and fast moving over stoney bottoms.

Yesterday, I sat by this small creek and simply watched and listened as the cool water flowed over a sparkling sand bottom. The shimmer of light on the ripples inspired me to make more of this that simply a photograph. I was trying to capture that subtle energy of the water, the play of light, and the many textures created by the flow.

The photo above is an abstraction on that initial image. For me, it ‘adequately’ captures that moment, shows the light, texture, and movement. I tried several other treatments, but none worked for me. I’m pleased with this one.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 2000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Past Frozen Shores” – Duffins Creek

“Past Frozen Shores” - Duffins Creek

A challenging composition. Part of the ‘trick’ to capturing the motion of water is to create a time exposure based on the speed of the water and the light available. I tend to do most of these earlier in the day, or late afternoon, when the sun is soft and indirect.

Last week I found myself, mid-day, looking at these wonderful scenes of water rushing past icy shores and trying to figure out how to take this home with me in photos. The challenge is being able to leave the shutter open long enough to create the nice motion blur without overexposing the snow and ice and losing all that texture. The additional challenge on this day was that I did not have a tripod with me and had to shoot hand-held at 1/8 seconds to get the effect I wanted and I force myself to shoot at 250 ISO as much as possible, to retain the ability to shoot as if I was using film.

I seem to have accomplished that in this photo and a few others I posted earlier. The water moves smoothly across the frame, the dappled sunlight reflects off the surface and lights up some of the rocks below the surface, yet you can still make out the details of the icicles and layers of snow along the shore. It was a wonderful feeling when I got home and saw the results of this outing.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 135mm
1/8 sec, f/32.0 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cold Rush” -Duffins Creek at Whitevale

“Cold Rush” - Duffins Creek at Whitevale

Moving water and the light playing of the waves. A few years ago, I started experimenting with different shutter speeds, trying to capture the movement well, without loosing details. The shutter speed needs to match the speed of the water or the image is too soft. Doing so in the winter is a particular challenge, since long exposures can blow out all the whites. That said, I like the soft winter light.

The photo above was made at Duffins Creek, in north Pickering, Ontario. Most of the river was frozen but there were a few open patches. This is a fairly tightly cropped view of one of those places.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 130 mm
1/8 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Whitevale Winter Falls” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Whitevale Winter Falls”

I have to admit that I have been to these falls many times over the past few years, but never in winter. The falls are the result of a dam being build to keep and introduced species of trout from migrating too far upstream and eating the eggs of the native brown trout. I’ve posted a few photos of this dam in the past.

The winter scene is beautiful, especially in the right light, which I was blessed with on this visit. It has been particularly cold over the past few weeks, which created a substantial buildup of ice to almost the height of the dam, which is about 5 meters. If you look carefully at the top of the photo you can also see the water coming from under the ice covered pond above the dam

The light plays nicely through the columns of ice and I decided to challenge myself with a long exposure. The results are very satisfying.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @82mm
1/8 sec, f/32, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Cloud Shrouded Cliffs” – Yosemite National Park

Cloud Shrouded Clifffs - Yosemite 2013

One of my sacred places is Yosemite National Park, in California. I fell in love with this sanctuary on my first visit in 1990, when my wife and I were just starting to date and I have returned several times since.

The sheer vastness and majesty of this place is difficult to describe. There are literally millions of photos taken here, as other visitors try to capture a fragment in time but few images can do this place justice.

The appearance of the valley, high in the Sierra Nevada, is constantly changing. Between seasons, time of day, and location. The light is almost fluid and, in my limited experience here, the same view rarely repeats itself. We are offered mere ‘moments’ to carry in our images and memories as we journey here.

A case in point is the image above, which was made in May 2013, my most recent visit to Yosemite. It was a cool and misty day, with of and on rain showers and brief intervals of sunshine. The cliffs pictures are just above Currie Village and just right of Upper Yosemite Falls, which were obscured by clouds when this image was made.

The movement of the clouds among the rocks and trees high above the valley was magical as the jagged granite cliffs would reveal themselves and then vanish like revenants behind the next billow. Each wave of mist would reveal, then obscure some new layer, then, like an ethereal set change, it would be gone again, replaced by something completely different and marvellous. I could have spent the whole day transfixed by this phenomenon and never seen the same combination twice.

I was fortunate to capture this image that reveal several layers as well as the raw beauty of the tree topped cliffs. I’m going to return to my beloved park sometime soon to see what further magic it has to offer me.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-300 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Stormy December on Lake Huron” – Point Clarke

“Stormy December on Lake Huron” - Point Clarke

In stark contrast to the past few weeks, the final remaining days of December are reminding us that, despite the delay, the inevitable cycle of autumn to winter has continued.

The past weekend I had an opportunity to visit the shores of Lake Huron once more. I was there in January of this year and there is a significant difference. In January, the lakeshore was a wonderland of bizarre and outlandish shapes and structures, ranging for ice-volcanoes to vast sheets of clear blue ice strewn with soccer-ball sized spheres of ice, as far as the eye could see.

Due to our extremely mild fall, the lake remains ice-free, yet starkly cold looking. Yesterday, the winds came in from the North around 50 km/h with an air temperature around  minus three degrees Celsius. In the time it took to set up my tripod, the combination of damp wind from the lake and cold temperatures, had removed the feeling from my fingers. The wind howled and raged around me as I made a few photos of the Point Clarke lighthouse and the adjacent shoreline, before packing up and heading inland and out of the biting wind.

The photo above is one of several I made of this scene. I believe it captures the violent movement of the wind-whipped waves, the sale blue December sky and the brilliance of the pale white lighthouse nicely. It looks like I’m moving into winter photography mode now.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8, @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com