Tag Archives: native

“Herb Robert – after the rain”

“Herb Robert, after the rain

Pink and tiny,
you sparkle from the forest floor.
Sweet and delicate,
you lead to summer’s warmth,
from late spring rains and mist.
– Ed Lehming

This delicate pink flower, Herb Robert, is in fact, a native Geranium. While a far cry from the fancy hybridized varieties we see in gardens, this diminutive wildflower is still quite lovely.

I made this image during my recent forest hike, just after the rain had stopped, so  everything has a nice fresh feel to it. The plants are quite low to the ground and since I did not want to lay right down to get a better angle, this one had to do.

My recurring thought during these forest walks is constantly, “Why did I not notice these before?”. I’ve spent most of my life enjoying the outdoors, yet seemed to have missed the finer details, which I am very happy for now. As I’ve mentioned before, I think being more deliberate about my photography has, by  default, made me more observant, which I am ever more grateful for.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/9.0 ISO 800

High Resolution Image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Joe-pye Weed”

“Joe-pye Weed

“He told her the flowers in her painting contained exactly the purple substance of the flowers on the desk in front of her […] Let us open the window and see if your painting can entice the butterflies.”
― Sarah Hall

Back out on the trails and enjoying the late summer heat. This oddly named plant, native to North America is named on a derivation of an aboriginal name Jopi, who was a native healer. Somewhere in time , the name stuck and became Joe-Pye.

This is a beautiful, tall, showy plant that can be found in wetlands and begins to bloom in late June. At this time of year, it’s still going strong and adds a nice plash of colour to the landscape as other plants are going to seed. Despite our drought-like conditions this summer, the local Joe-Pye is looking strong and healthy. Perhaps that is where one of its other names “Queen of the Meadow” comes from, as it’s also a very tall plant, related to sunflowers.

This particular specimen was found along the roadside, outside the hamlet of Claremont. I noticed a rather health customer of the plants just off the road and down a short path and decided this one was going to be the one I’d photograph, since it was very healthy and unblemished.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/8 sec, f/22.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pearl Crescent” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Pearl Crescent ( Phyciodes tharos )”  - Whitevale, Ontario

“Butterflies are self propelled flowers.”
― Robert A. Heinlein

Butterflies are summer to me and I just love the Robert Heinlein quote above. As the air warms, I see more and more of them darting around on the air. They seem to come in all sizes and colours and tend to be a bit elusive when it comes time to photograph them. They sit wonderfully still, till it’s time to release the shutter.

I’m also discovering just how many varieties of butterflies and moths are native to my area of the world. I enjoy identifying the plants and animals I come across on my wanderings and am being more deliberate in the habit lately, as I see other bloggers whom I follow doing the same thing.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm

1/80 sec, f/5.6 ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Wild Columbine” – Marble Lake, Bancroft

“Wild Columbines” - Marble Lake, Bancroft

“The columbine and iris bowed down to make way for bolder sprays of red valerian, and a mingled profusion of clustered Canterbury bells and sweet william, pale blues and pinks intertwined, danced at the feet of more stately spears of deep-purple foxglove and monkshood.” 
― Susanna Kearsley

On the trend of pinks and pastels, yet another beautiful native spring flower, the Wild Columbine (aquilegia canadensis), is found on rocky outcrops in the Bancroft, Ontario area among emerging ferns, jack-in-the-pulpit, and a few late trilliums. I really enjoy finding these little jewels on my walks in the woods. A little splash of coral catches my eye, then another. They seem to favour cracks in the rock over flat soil. They are such delicate plants and seem almost fragile compared to their thick stemmed and fibrous companions.

The only shortcoming of getting out to enjoy these lovely wildflowers is the ever present company of black flies, the bane of Canadian forests in spring time. However, based on the very warm weekend we just had here, they should be gone in short measure and their associates, the mosquitoes, will take their place in the stinging insect category.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spawning Suckers” – Duffins Creek

“Spawning Suckers” - Duffins Creek

“We must begin thinking like a river if we are to leave a legacy of beauty and life for future generations.”
― David Brower

Amidst the exciting rainbow trout run at Duffins Creek, other species of native fish are also in the spawn, including the White Suckers, pictured above, which are mixed among the trout as they work their way upstream.

As I was walking the shore, enjoying and photographing the trout, I came across this group of suckers as they hovered above the stoney creek bed. The water was crystal clear and offered a nice view of the suckers in an interesting formation. The slight distortion of the water made this an interesting composition for me.

I always find it awesome that this beauty is just outside my doorstep, yet some people I meet locally have no idea it even exists. This is among the reasons I make photos, to prove to others that the things I experience daily are real and more than some embellished memory.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 135 mm
1/200 sec, f/2.8 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Past Beauty” – Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

“Past Beauty” - Dead Flowerheads, Wendat Pond, Stouffville

I made this photo a few days ago while on an evening  walk. The light was just softening and I found the dead stems an interesting subject, considering the world around is greening up with the first few truly mild days.

These are old flower heads from wildflowers growing around Wendat Pond. The pond was named after a large native city that was found to have been located in this area. For me, it’s a nice place to walk and consider what it may have looked like a few centuries ago. Did those early people look at things the way I do?

To make this photo, I took advantage of the soft light and a depth of field just narrow enough to keep the stems in focus while trying to isolate the flower heads from the background.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-2000 mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm
1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 250