Tag Archives: natural

“Intrusion”

“Intrusion”

“Nature knows no pause in progress and development, and attaches her curse on all inaction.  “
– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

The title for this image came to me immediately. It is driven by the essence of ‘how’ I photograph. I refrain from most things man-made. Sometimes it can be as innocuous as a well groomed path through the woods, preferring to imagine things as purely as possible, untouched by humans, rare though that is nowadays.

In this image, part of my recent “Papineau Bend” series, a stone BBQ pit stands in the forefront, an intruder to this lovely place. Yet, at some point in time, the fire pit was built for the enjoyment of families who visited this peaceful sanctuary along the shores of Papineau Creek. Were it not for this park being carved from the woods I may never have discovered this place. Time has had its effect on the park though and the BBQ is showing definite signs that nature will eventually have her way, through a gradual and unrelenting wearing down. Frost, rain, roots, and various plants are creating ever widening cracks in the cement, offering larger footholds for nature to pry apart the stonework, returning it to the earth.

Despite the intrusion, the overall scene of the pines remains one of beauty that I wanted to share through another of my photo abstractions, bright, late summer sunshine lighting up the delicate needles of the pines and hemlocks. Just reflecting back on the moment when I made this image lightens my heart and beckons me back to this place, intrusions or not.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“What Lies Beneath”

“What Lies Beneath”

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.”
― Albert Einstein

There is something magical about ice, by times. During this past week’s thaw and freezing, some interesting effects were created. Far too many to share in a single post. Ice has formed into a myriad of shapes, forms, and textures.

As I went for a long needed hike today, along the familiar banks of Duffins Creek, a moderately sized creek that runs close to my home, I was greeted by a mix of flowing open water and frozen shorelines. Most of the scenes were fairly typical and not much stood out as unique, until I came to a bend in the creek where the ice had not quite formed yet. It was at that point where it was a very firm slush and still a bit transparent, allowing me to see the blurry outlines of the pebbles below. What made it more interesting, to me, was the chunks of ice included in this natural composition, as well as some trapped bubbles. That, and the beautiful February sunlight that lit the creek bed through the ice.

As I stood there, making the image, I realized that this spot is only a few meters away from where I made my favourite Rainbow Trout image this past spring. This beautiful creek has offered me many lovely memories, and photos, over the past few years.

It seems nature never runs out of unique combinations of elements in her toolkit with which to create artworks. I’m just happy to be able to participate in her latest showing.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – September 15, 2016

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This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

Yet another return to the University of Toronto and its doors. Today, I have chosen a peculiar doorway to Trinity College. Though it’s difficult to show the scale on the photo, the doorway is quite short, only about five feet tall. I’m not sure what the significance is, perhaps it forces you to bow on entering?

This portion of the building is a more recent addition, as indicated by the cornerstone, though it still had the same wonderful architecture as the main building it was added to.

Once again, this day offered me superb natural light which shone from the stones, illumination the wonderful oak doors.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com