Tag Archives: Nikon D800

“The Gut – Revisited”

"The Gut - Revisited"

“To my mind, a picture should be something pleasant, cheerful, and pretty, yes pretty! There are too many unpleasant things in life as it is without creating still more of them.”
― Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I’ve contemplated this image many times. The original photo was very dark. I was trying to capture this beautiful gorge, aptly named “The Gut“, near Apsley, Ontario this past summer. It’s a very challenging photo due to dark shadows caused by the deep canyon walls to the left and the intensely bright cliff walls on the right. Yet my eyes saw this beautiful verdant passageway and all its colours as one evenly lit image.

There’s the problem we often face as photographers. Our eyes see something and the camera is just not as versatile as our eyes and brain in interpreting the image. That’s a reason I’m quite clear in stating that my photos depict ‘how’ I saw it. A person standing with me might not see it the same. Different eyes, different brain.

The joy in owning my Nikon D300, even though it’s a few years older, is that the image sensor is able to pull so much detail out of the shadows, with very little noise, when I edit the RAW image. I spent a bit of time dodging and burning the image, trying to balance out the light, yet even then, the image was not quite close to my vision.

I pulled the image into my Topaz Impression plug-in and rendered the image as an Impasto painting, with no further adjustments and, Voila! I had an image that did justice to what I saw that day. I don’t see this as cheating, rather, it’s a way for me to communicate my personal experience in a way that others might appreciate it.

The final image above shows all the richness of the forest, the glow of the afternoon sun on the cliff face and the movement and shimmer of the river, as it winds its way through the gorge. Very close to how I saw it, that wonderful hot afternoon in July.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 17 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Poinsettia – A Closer Look”

“Poinsettia - A Closer Look”

“Our hearts grow tender with childhood memories and love of kindred, and we are better throughout the year for having, in spirit, become a child again at Christmas-time.”
― Laura Ingalls Wilder

I could not resist taking a closer look at this poinsettia. As a child I’d often look at them, marvelling at the bright red petals, that are actually leaves, rather bracts (modified leaves), as they transition to green further down the plant. Then there are the actual flowers, which are the bright yellow part in the centre. It seems that when the light hits them just right, they seem to be almost metallic.

So, to be able to photograph this view is a real joy for me. It allows me to really see the complex structures and wonderful texture in the leaves. All the details are here to look at and enjoy.

There is a really good chance this image might just be my 2016 Christmas card.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 70 mm
1.3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 200

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cedar Waxwing”

“Cedar Waxwing”

“When you gaze out on a quiet, peaceful meadow, next to a still pond, under a motionless blue sky, you wonder how the noisy, busy cacophony of life could have arisen from such silent, motionless beginning.”  – M.

It would appear that I’ve gone to the birds, at least for a short time. The past few dull days have not offered much in the way of material to photograph, so I’ve gone back and reviewed a few from the past summer. I’m not sure why I did not post this one earlier but I recall the moment very clearly. I was at Secord Pond making some images of flowers and this beautiful bird landed in the tree right next to me and allowed me to get quite close and make multiple images of him. He did not seem to mind me at all. It brought on a wonderful stillness, as I simply observed him and made the ocassional photo, the the moment was right

This image is the best of the bunch and I’m really pleased that I was able to capture the reflected light reflecting from the water beneath him. It casts a bit of a shadow on his neck but lights his belly up nicely. I was also fortunate that the light conditions enabled me to produce the lovely bokeh at the wide aperture, diffusing the background colours.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 280 mm
1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“December Poinsettia”

“December Poinsettia”

“Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful. ”
― Norman Vincent Peale

I’m a few days late posting this. I meant to get it out for December first, but did not, since I was still saying goodbye to yellow and had not purchased a poinsettia for our home yet.

It’s a challenging plant to photograph, trying not to blow out the reds while pulling the details of the deep green leaves from the shadows. This one took me a few attempts but overall I’m pleased with the results.

And, of course, the poinsettia is a modern symbol for Christmas. Now that autumn is a fond memory, I look forward for future moments, with friends and family and the comfort that is Christmas in our home. First step taken, poinsettia is on the table as a centrepiece, let the next season begin.

Nikon D800
Nikor 24-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ @ 45 mm
1.3 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Coral Gerbera”

“Coral Gerbera”

“Always be friendly, always be kind,
Like the most beautiful flower that you can find.”
― Debasish Mridha

This image is a switch back to some of my earlier floral images. I went back through older images that I have not had the opportunity to edit  and found this one of a gerbera that was part of a larger floral arrangement.

I had a hard time with this one, as the coral colour is tough to reproduce to my satisfaction. So, like many images, I return to it once more, hoping to extract the image I had envisioned when I made it. A different day, a different eye, and the results now please me enough to share it. I’m hoping to do a bit more studio work over the winter months, it will help brighten the days for me, and hopefully, those who follow my blog.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/22.0, ISO 400

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Even in Our Darkness…”

“Even in Our Darkness...”

“I am a forest, and a night of dark trees: but he who is not afraid of my darkness, will find banks full of roses under my cypresses.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

As I was reviewing my photos from the past few weeks, I kept glancing at this one, which at first seemed a bit dark for me. When I opened the thumbnail and looked closer it brought me back to the moment when I made the photo and I recalled why I made it.

I was sitting on a rock above a large beaver pond in the late afternoon. The dense spruce and hemlock forest was dark and damp, green with moss, and a bit foreboding feeling. Yet, through the dark canopy, a narrow opening allowed a patch of bright sunlight through. Just enough light to reveal the multitude of colour present in the dark place. Some trees glow green with mosses and lichen, while others, a soft brown. There are others which remain quite dark and gray, yet above, even the canopy has a soft green brightness to it.

So, despite what appears to be darkness, there is light, if we are observant and take the time to look.

How often have we experienced this darkness in our lives, the narrow sphere we feel we are in? Yet, just on the periphery, bright lives continue, children laugh, people love, and the world, even on rainy days, sits in wait of sunlight, which inevitably comes.

So, look deeply into this scene, which appears dark and somewhat sinister and see all the light in the details. Is this a forest you would walk joyfully into, even being aware of the subtle brightness? What lies beyond that line trees? There was more life beyond this veil of darkness. In fact, a beautiful grove of majestic oaks awaited me, just over the next rise. Sometimes you have to risk it and break through to the next layer, encouraged by the hints of light we are all given. Though not Nietzsche’s banks of roses, it was wonderful, nonetheless.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“So near, and yet…”

“So near, and yet...”

“Distance sometimes lets you know who is worth keeping, and who is worth letting go.”
― Lana Del Rey

This is a bit of a shift for me today. I went back in my photo archive, looking for some colour and came across this image I made in the spring. The title came to me as soon as I saw the image, recalling how I composed it, deliberately leaving the dark area between the butterfly and the flower.

They were only inches apart, yet through the viewfinder, it appeared that the butterfly had a journey to make, a dark void to cross, as he sat considering the blossom. This was also true literally, as the image was made at the Niagara Butterfly Conservatory, not outdoors,  and this little fellow had plenty of competition lying in wait, seeking the same blossom, though they are out of the frame here.

It was also a bit of challenge for me, attempting macro-type photography with my 70-200mm zoom. But, the light was good, and the image stabilization was quite effective. However, I would like to return next year with a macro lens and attempt it once more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/60 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com