Tag Archives: Nikon D800

“Sunshine Grove” – Hermon, Ontario

“Sunshine Grove- Hermon, Ontario

“Rather than crying and  craving for those who left our path during dark moments of our life, let’s spend some time to thank those who stood and helped us to pass those dark paths.”
― Nehali Lalwani

This image was made on a somewhat foggy morning. As the fog dissipated I came across this scene. Amidst a damp low area, filled with spruce and hemlock, stands a small grove of silver birch. The sun streaming through the branches, lighting up the forest floor in glowing bands and reflecting off the shiny bark made it seem like a magical place. Literally, a light among the darkness. I sat here for quite some time, on the log in the foreground, just enjoying the light and sense of peace this place brought me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/120 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“November Fog” – Fraser Lake, Ontario

“November Fog” - Fraser Lake, Ontario

“She is free in her wildness, she is a wanderess, a drop of free water. She knows nothing of borders and cares nothing for rules or customs. ‘Time’ for her isn’t something to fight against. Her life flows clean, with passion, like fresh water.”
― Roman Payne

If today’s forecast is any indication, it would appear that our wonderful, mild Ontario November is at an end and winter is anxiously knocking on our door.

That makes my memories of my ‘retreat’ at the beginning of this week all the more special. Cool nights and warm days brought a combination of colourful sunrises and a few foggy ones. Both are beautiful in their own way.

The image above was made this past Wednesday as the fog drifted lazily over the lake and draped the landscape with a layered veil, creating shadows in varying tones of gray. The landscape was quiet and serene as I stood on the shores of Fraser Lake, a gentle breeze moving tendrils of mist along the shoreline.

I felt the black and white image of this scene best conveyed the mood and puts me back to that time and place. A wonderful reminder of gentle November days to savour as the cold of winter takes hold.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 175 mm
1/30 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

High Res Image is on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Moody Dawn over Irish Valley” – Fort Stewart, Ontario

“Moody Dawn over Irish Valley” - Fort Stewart, Ontario

“Daybreak,’ he said, looking out at it. ‘I always thought it was funny that dawn should be called daybreak. This is when the day is made – it’s the beginning. I’ts the best part: you’ve got all the potential of the day to come, and you haven’t wasted yet. When it gets dark, that should be daybreak. When the day is broken. When it turns into night time, that’s when it all start’s to go wrong.”
― Erin Kelly

The recent November dawns and dusks have been spectacular, whether on the lake or off. With cool nights and warm days, fog, in all its forms was readily available.

On this particular morning the fog had lifted into a low, churning, cloud deck that left vestiges of itself lingering in the valley below. In the distant right, the sun makes its appearance, ready to burn off the moisture, leading into a beautiful sunny day with only traces of the cloud to remind us of how the day began.

Irish Valley is an area of northeastern Ontario just east of Bancroft in the North Hastings Highlands region. The Little Mississippi River meanders below pasture lands in the foreground. A little piece of paradise that I will miss over the winter.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 800

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Edge of the Forest Trail”

edge-of-the-forest-trail

“The best part of the journey is the surprise and wonder along the way.”
― Ken Poirot

As I’ve done a few times in the past, I turned this image into a painting, through the wonder of Topaz software.

There are times when I envision an image with the camera and it does not quite meet my expectations. The above image is one of those. The sunlight was beautiful, casting long autumn shadows on the golden forest floor. The oaks had dropped most of their leaves and only the high canopy remained, filtering the sunlight to a soft orange. The leaves you see still clinging to the trees on the right are all beech. Yet, the rythm and warmth that I wanted to convey through the photo was lacking. By softening it, through brush strokes, that ‘feeling’ comes through better.

This path, at Uxbridge’s North Walker Woods parallels the forest’s southern edge. To the left are private properties consisting of homes and farms, all backing onto this little slice of paradise. To the right are rolling, oak covered hills. What struck me as I walked this perimeter trail was how the trail beckoned me further along, always wondering what might lie beyond the next dip. At the very end of this trail is the small pine forest where I made the image for “Be Still…” and the start of the trail is where I made “The Trailhead”, posted earlier this week.

Many more photos were created during this brief hike, of all of them, only this one did not satisfy me as a photograph. So, it’s nice to have options.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 85mm
1/180 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Uxbridge Autumn”

“Uxbridge Autumn”

“Who will bear witness to these small islands and oases of wildness as land is divided and sold to become strip malls, housing developments,and parking lots? What happens to the natural history here? We must bear witness.”
― Joni L. James

The sky yesterday was unbelievable. I had a brief errand to run which put me on the road towards Uxbridge, Ontario. From my window, this scene unfolded and I had to stop to capture it, to bear witness to this ‘oasis’, literally, on the outskirts of local development. All too soon these places will be mere memories.

Cold winds blew thin clouds in from the north and many trees had dropped their leaves already, but what remained was gorgeous! The sun bathed the rolling farm fields in a warm light that contradicted the cold wind and set the distant treeline ablaze with yellow light. I’m so happy I had my camera with me and was able to do the image justice. I can almost see the clouds drifting across the scene.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Be Still…”

“Be Still...”

“In transitions, we must learn to be still. Being still is, in part, about learning to be comfortable with ambiguity.”
― Janet Rebhan

These are the words that echo through my head, as I consider this recent image and the events over the past several months and yesterday evening. I find myself standing here once more, drinking in the beauty and the quiet, as the world goes on about me. But here, in this place, in this moment, I am still. I am still and the quiet of the forest surrounds me, nourishes me, makes me aware of its life. In this small part of my world, I am at peace.

The contrast between the dark tree trunks and the bright sun soaked forest floor, as well the bright green ferns, still lush among the fallen leaves, makes me consider all the extremes we are faced with and how they can coexist in this small, quiet place and make the whole scene beautiful.

Be Still…, also echoes the verses of a favourite hymn, and reminds me that I am part of an incredible creation and that there is peace in faith as well.

This is my refuge, my quiet place, and affords me the ability to be still, even though I can’t be there right now. I’m hoping this little glimpse affords you that stillness as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 75 mm
1/4 sec, f/14.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Warm Fuzzies”

“Warm Fuzzies”.jpg

“As the sun lives on when it sets in the warmth it has given to others, you too will live on in the hearts of those whose lives you have touched.”
― Matshona Dhliwayo

I could think of no better title for this image of a mature milkweed pod, backlit by a late afternoon autumn sun.

The image was not one I set out to make but was one of those ‘opportunities’ that often comes up in most photographer’s days. There is a grove of poplars which I photographed last year, at their peak of colour, that I was hoping to revisit for another try. The light was not great and I have yet to review all my shots. However, as I stood there photographing the poplars, I could not help but be drawn to the multitude of brightly shimmering milkweed pods as they moved about in the gentle breeze. Each one seemed to lit up from inside. Also, for this time of year, it was a warm day, thus the combination of the warm and fuzzies.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 170 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Golden Moments”

“Golden Moments”

“Do you know how there are moments when the world moves so slowly you can feel your bones shifting, your mind tumbling? When you think that no matter what happens to you for the rest of your life, you will remember every last detail of that one minute forever?”
― Jodi Picoult

As I mentioned on a previous post, I had the opportunity this past weekend to get back on the trails, spend some time with my son, and make more photos.

In several aspects, we experienced ‘Golden Moments”. The soft autumn sunlight made both the canopy and forest floor glow with golden light, trees cast long, yet barely noticeable shadows on the ground, and we had a great time discussing photography, light, and composition.

My son is in his third year of university for film making and has a great sense for all of the above and is quite a talented photographer as well, yet he sees thing slightly differently from me, which has been a great learning experience for both of us, as we walk and discuss what and how we are seeing the scenes around of us.

Often he will see something that did not catch my eye and vice versa. The joy in this is that we are both able to communicate well what that ‘something’ is. Then the other will see it as well. I found this has expanded my art as a photographer significantly.

After all, if I can’t understand how others may see my work, then I believe I’m not fully communicating my vision.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 78 mm
1/80 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Trailside Birch”

“Trailside Birch”

“You never know what’s around the corner. It could be everything. Or it could be nothing. You keep putting one foot in front of the other, and then one day you look back and you’ve climbed a mountain.”
― Tom Hiddleston

Ah, the weekend again and a nice time to get out and enjoy what autumn has to offer. As I went for a hike with my son we both noted that fall is a sensory banquet, filled with sights, sounds, smells and texture. We left taste to another time, though pumpkin pie did enter the conversation as a possibility.

I’ve hiked this train more times than I can remember, yet every time, it offers something new. At this point in the trail there is a small but wonderful grove of birch trees. Larger birches are spare in this area and usually not in well established groves. This one is right on the trail and grows on a gentle hillside, allowing ample sunlight to warm the roots. The rest of the forest in this section is largely maple and beech. It’s the beech leaves littering the forest floor that give it that beautiful coppery glow.

Something I have not tried here was a vertical pan, which I have been enjoying a lot lately. I made three images and chose this one as my favourite. There is a nice contrast between the greens and oranges against the bright blue sky, broken up by the white lines of the birches. To see another of this grove, please check my other image made here last year. Last year’s image offered a bit more leaf cover and more undergrowth.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 75 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Let Me Get This Straight”

“Let Me Get this Straight”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
― William Blake

At first, this image was in my ‘discard’ pile. The bend and tilt of the trees bothered me and I could not get it ‘straight’. I realized that the wobble , though distracting to me,  was OK and that there were wonderful textures and movement in this image once I reconsidered the image as a whole.

This image was made on the same day as the rest of what I am now referring to as my “God-light” series. As you can see, the sunlight is abundant and the forest floor is strewn with golden leaves. Yet, small patches of green still linger. A beautiful day to absorb this scene.

This got me considering how many other things and people we may relegate to our ‘discard’ pile when first impressions discomfort us. In future, I intend to remind myself of this image and consider the many reasons how these trees got their bend in the first place.

I love the quote: “Art, brings comfort to the disturbed and disturbs the comfortable”.
I find it becoming a bit of a mantra for me of late.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/5sec, f/14.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com