Tag Archives: November

“Paudash Reflections”

“Paudash Reflections”

“As winter takes hold, autumn lashes out in fiery shows of golds and orange as if shouting, “My splendour is not yet spent”, her voice fading in the chill of November, another day closer to winter.”
– Ed Lehming

Such was the scene today as I drove home from a visit to Bancroft, Ontario. I had driven up for the day to drop of recent prints at the Artists Co-op I belong to there, A Place for the Arts. As is my habit, I always have my camera gear with me when I travel.

Today was no exception, as I left the snow-covered countryside close to home, the snowy blanket covering the ground actually thinned as we headed further north. Our recent snowfalls stayed mainly to southern Ontario, so far.

I noticed a lot of open water and some very thin sheets of ice on the smaller lakes. It has been cold enough to freeze but even a bit of movement in the water will soon break up an evening’s freeze up. We had a pleasant drive up but nothing really caught my attention.

After dropping off my work and visiting with some fellow artists, I headed a bit further north, to my brother-in-law’s woodlot, in hopes of a few winter images for Christmas cards, managing to get a few that may realize into what I was after.

Leaving the woodlot, we proceeded home and on looking at the low clouds, I said to my wife, “It looks like we may have a nice sunset today, if the trees don’t block the view.” That was certainly the case, for a portion of the drive, till I rounded a corner and was greeted with this beautiful view of the eastern arm of Paudash Lake. It was just cold enough to start making a fine film of clear smooth ice and the sun hung just above the treeline, shining through the dark wisps of fall clouds.

I stopped along the roadside and composed a few shots. Of the four that I made, this one appealed to me the most in terms of composition and feel. You can just discern where the ice ends and open water begins, including a pair of ducks taking advantage of a brief opening before the lake fully freezes over, which I expect will be very soon.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 110 mm
1/640 sec, f/13.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Iceland Journal – “Skessuhorn” – West Iceland

“Skessuhorn” - West Iceland

“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” 
― John Muir

It feels a bit odd using a John Muir quote here, because they know the mountains he is referring to, namely the Sierra Nevada of California and Yosemite National Park. Yet, his words ring true in these mountains as well. On this day, my son and I headed south, towards the coastal town of Borgarnes, in Western Iceland.

As we drove south from the Westfjords, a large group of mountains greeted us on the far horizon. These mountains are centered around Skarðsheiði, a 1,054 m peak. In the foreground, and just peeking through a large bank of low cloud was Skessuhorn, a steep mountain with its wonderful terraced slopes. I just kept looking at it, hoping the road would bring me nearer and that the cloud cover would not increase.

In fact, the cloud bank clung to the mountains all day and only Skessuhorn has clearly visible to us. So, when you look at this image, be aware that, in typical Iceland fashion, much of what is before is not currently visible, only being revealed for short periods and then gone again.

For me, it’s these fantastic horizontal terraces that give many Icelandic mountains such a unique appearance, as opposed to North America’s Rocky Mountains, which, while still layered, are angled. These mountains look like pyramids, with layers carefully planned out and neatly stacked. It all has to do with the unique geology of Iceland, which straddles two continental plates, creating volcanoes and areas of tectonic upheaval that sculpt the rock in such marvelous ways. By the way, this is a colour photo, but the colour is lost, in snow and rock and cloud.

Here’s the summer time Street View link. I think it looks much nicer in November:

https://www.google.ca/maps/@64.550391,-21.7315944,3a,75y,159.08h,87.87t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1szHTNa_fTrV0AMZqprCHs9Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 180mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Winter’s First Kiss”

“Winter’s First Kiss”

“Snow flurries began to fall and they swirled around people’s legs like house cats. It was magical, this snow globe world.” 
― Sarah Addison Allen

Here’s yet another image, made during a recent snow squall, a squall which abruptly shoved us closer to winter.

The large flakes quickly stuck to branches weighing them down and obscuring all traces of autumn with their bright purity.

I got out around noon to try to capture some of this wonder and was pleased that the ‘feel’ of the snow squall translated well through my images despite the flat light and the thick and continuous snowfall.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 140mm
1/800 sec, f/2.8, ISO 160

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“November Squall” – Stouffville Reservoir

“November Squall” - Stouffville Reservoir

“In November, the earth is growing quiet. It is making its bed, a winter bed for flowers and small creatures. The bed is white and silent, and much life can hide beneath its blankets.” 
― Cynthia Rylant

I wanted to post another photo of the beautiful wintery scenes created by last Friday’s snow squalls. Though a bit early for my liking, heavy snows turned the world into a wonderland in mere minutes.

The world now lays buried under this thick blanket of snow, only hints of autumn’s brightness remain, in stubborn yellow leaves, shining brightly between the large snowflakes.

Beyond that, colours are soft and subdued, the world is quiet, as if taking a deep breath before it’s winter repose.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 95mm
1/200 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“November Birches” – Stouffville Reservoir

“November Birches” - Stouffville Reservoir

“In November, the trees are standing all sticks and bones. Without their leaves, how lovely they are, spreading their arms like dancers. They know it is time to be still.” 
― Cynthia Rylant

Today I decide to make a short departure from my Iceland Journal, though that will continue for some time, as I continue to process the images and memories.

While I revel in those times, not so long ago, nature reminded me that there is beauty here in the present as well. An early November squall brought us a winter wonderland in mid-November.

Some trees are still hanging on to their leaves and it is not quite time to say farewell to yellow and orange for the season. Through the heavy snowfall, bright leaves still shine, bringing colour to the otherwise monotone landscape. Those too will soon be gone. I’m sure the weight of the snow and the cold nights will accelerate their departure as the world falls into the quiet gray sleep of winter, once more.

I did not have to go far afield for this image, it was made just steps from my home, at a local conservation area which always has some new wonder to offer me. Today was no exception.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 122mm
1/200 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Firsts and Lasts”

“Firsts and Lasts”

“The beauty of any first time is that it leads to a thousand others…” 
― Pico Iyer

This was the end of November, the first significant snowfall, enough to dust the ground in white and remain well into the day. It was also the last day of any noticeable foliage. The last leaf had fallen to the ground, adding to the blanket of rusty browns. It’s yet another transition time in the forest, an extended transition at those. For those who regularly visit this blog, you will have noticed a very extended autumn, filled with bright colours, which lasted from September, well into November.

Here I stood bidding that glorious time goodbye and hesitantly welcoming the first snows. As I stood there, what really resonated with me was that, despite the dormancy beginning, there was still a good deal of colour and vibrancy, something that is enhanced by my abstracting technique.

It’s not the first time I’ve noticed this, but I’m becoming ever more aware of this and it comes up in conversations with friends who do not spend much time outside. Their impression is that this time of year tends to be dull. Then I show them some of my images and they are surprised at what they don’t seem to see. Photography has given me new eyes, I perceive more, now that I am doing it deliberately and I’m really enjoying the experiences it has brought me.

So, as the quote I chose aptly says, these firsts lead to many more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD@78mm

1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Beyond the Birch”

“Beyond the Birch”

“It looked like the world was covered in a cobbler crust of brown sugar and cinnamon.” 
― Sarah Addison Allen

As autumn progresses, the brightness fades by degrees. To capture the stunning light of the past weeks is proving more of a challenge over a few cloudy days on the trails. It all fits into the theme of this, my “Shift to Shiver” series.

By now much of the once golden canopy has fallen, the victim of time, wind, and rain, carpeting the forest floor with a rusty blanket. A few hearty maples still hold fast to their yellow leaves, while beeches gradually change from the bright green of a few weeks ago to a coppery orange. Some of the scant undergrowth still manages to show hints of green. These too will be short-lived as the days shorten and the temperatures inevitably drop.

I’ve been truly blessed by an unseasonably mild October and early November, which resulted in an extremely extended colour change. It’s been tough not be on the trails when conditions are like this. The image that I’m sharing today was made at North Walkers Woods, part of the Oak Ridges Trail system. It was to be the start of an unplanned fourteen kilometer hike and resulted in many photos to sort though, as I want to keep this series to about eight representative images.

As I write today, the temperature has dropped to -10 and overnight snow squalls have drastically changed the scenery. So, I’ll be on the trails again on Sunday, making more photos and drinking in what nature has to offer me.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/16.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Bejeweled Shiver”

“There is October in every November and there is November in every December! All seasons melted in each other’s life!” 
― Mehmet Murat Ildan

As a start to a new series and cooler climes, this image is the first in my new series of images: “Shift to Shiver”, and will document the few weeks between the bright yellows and red of late October and focus on the deep orange and coppers of early November in my area. A time when months bleed into each other, yet the inevitable cycle of the seasons cannot be stopped.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
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“November’s Golden Litter” – Hermon, Ontario

"November's Golden Litter" - Hermon, Ontario“November is usually such a disagreeable month…as if the year had suddenly found out that she was growing old and could do nothing but weep and fret over it. This year is growing old gracefully…just like a stately old lady who knows she can be charming even with gray hair and wrinkles. We’ve had lovely days and delicious twilights.”
― L.M. Montgomery

It reminded me of a scene from The Hobbit, as Bilbo enters Smaug’s lair and sees gold strewn everywhere, pouring across the floor and flowing between the columns. Though this is not gold, rather, an abundance of oak and beech leaves covering the rugged forest floor near Bancroft Ontario, flowing like a golden river between the rocks and trees.

Four mild November days and bright sunshine made the forest a wonderland of colour and light, especially accented by the golden leaves which were everywhere, on the tops of ridges, on ledges, and in deep valleys, everything was alight in the same golden glow. It really was surreal.

The image above is just one of many I made while hiking through tone of the deep valleys that is so typical of this region. Many ridges are a challenge to climb, so some careful planning is required before the attempt is made. This particular valley is quite shallow but many feature sheer drops and I’ve found my way through them with several years of exploring. It’s always a pleasure to get back here.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/120 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 64

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Granite and Water” – Burleigh Falls

"Granite & Water' Burleigh Falls

On a cold, dull November afternoon in 2014, I stopped for a few minutes at Burliegh Falls, a set of fairly intense rapids just off Highway#28 in the Kawartha Lakes region of Central Ontario, between Lower Buckhorn Lake, above and Stoney Lake, below.

It’s a very scenic location, easily accessible from the road, and therefore, very busy in the summer and early autumn. The rapids, adjacent shoreline, and calm pools below, are a destination for tourists, photographers, painters, swimmers, and fishermen.

The intensity of the rapids is dependant on the flow of water through a dam above them, designed to regulate water levels on the Trent-Severn canal system, parallel to the rapids. That November the flow was quite intense. This particular day was cold, windy, and overcast. Not ideal sightseeing conditions but, with the exception of the cold and wind, very nice for photography. The dull skies allowed me to make several long exposure images of the falls/rapids, including the one above, which I manipulated in Photoshop to look like a painting to get the effect I wanted to show. Again, for me it’s about how I see and experience things, rather than being simply an image in time. Don’t get me wrong, the original image is very nice as a photo, but did not communicate ‘how’ this scene unfolded for me at the time.

I’ve mentioned several times in the past that I can’t paint, but would love too. I like to look of the long brush strokes, the intense whites with hints of green and purple, and how it imparts so well the power of the water as it rushes by the far shore. The ‘painterly’ style, also intensifies the texture of the granite in the background. In my mind, this image captures the raw beauty of the province I live in and have the opportunity to enjoy and share.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm, f/4.5-5.6 @ 75 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com