Tag Archives: ontario

“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“We are living a life full of first experiences, from a first kiss, to the first time giving blood, to conceptual and philosophical explanations of humanity’s firsts.”
― Kat Lahr

I should call this series of photographs “Firsts”, since most of my recent posts have been of the first blossoms of local wildflowers. It’s been a bit of a strange season, with a few vigorous specimens blooming a few days ahead of their neighbouring companions.

That has made me wonder why those few are so much more advanced. It’s not anything obvious like more sunlight, less competition, or better soil that seems to be the cause. Though I do enjoy the isolation of the single blossoms, as they are not drowned out by a large bloom. Perhaps that’s why I’ve been so drawn to creating my studio images of flowers in isolation. It allows the viewer to focus on the details of the individual flower.

This Wake Robin, or red trillium, as it is commonly know here, was a single blossom surrounded by a large patch of Wild Ginger, which I intend to return to, since it is also about to bloom. The lighting was a bit harsher and more direct than I had wanted, despite being in a fairly dense forest glade. The bright lighting actually enhanced the petals, giving them an almost metallic appearance. There were many more plants close to blooming. I figure they will be in full show in the next day or two, if temperatures remain as mild as they have been the past few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/40 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Blue Cohosh Buds and Flowers”

“Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.”
― Anne Frank

A few days a ago I went to a large grove of these early spring bloomers for a few more shots of the unusual tiny purple flowers. This particular grove contains thousands of these plants and the forest floor almost looks burnt with the density of Cohosh growing here, interspersed with freshly emerging trillium and wild leeks.

I had no idea just how complex the structures were until I started shooting them with my 90 mm macro lens and can’t seem to get enough of them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/50 sec, f/11.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“European Butterbur”

“Northern Sweet Coltsfoot”

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
― Marcel Proust

I found this interesting plant last year, growing in an isolated patch. There are no other instances of this plant in the area, so I’m wondering if it hitchhiked to its current location. It’s a beautiful but strange-looking plant. Like the common yellow coltsfoot which grows in the same area, it blooms before putting out leaves, though the one I photographed is showing a full leaf, just developed and another emerging from the ground.

The biggest joy for me, when exploring the paths and riverways around my home is discovering these little gems and getting to understand the incredible diversity of plants and wildlife in an area that many would consider mundane, even boring, from a photographer’s point of view.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/8 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Virginia Spring Beauties”

“Virginia Spring Beauties”

“It is spring again. The earth is like a child that knows poems by heart.”
― Rainer Maria Rilke

One of the unique features about the area that I live is that it is surrounded by pockets of what is known as “Carolinian Forest”, that is, many of the plants and animals in the area can usually be found in the warmer climates of Carolina, Virginia, and Ohio.

This means that I have access to plants and wildlife not normally associated with Canada. I suppose to this point I have pretty much taken that for granted. But now, as I focus more and more on the complex ecosystems within this biosphere, I appreciate it more and more.

I have also become quite attuned to the progressions of these plants. Meaning; when I notice one blooming, I have a good sense when the next species will bloom and start actively looking for them. The sequence begins with Coltsfoot, the first yellow flowers of the season, followed by Blue Cohosh, and the Virginia Spring Beauty pictured above.

Spring Beauties are just that, beautiful, delicate plants with lovely flowers which vary a bit between pink and light purple. Around here, they seem to prefer growing at the base of beech trees. I enjoy them so much because they are the first real show of colour, other than yellow, to emerge from the cover of dead leaves.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/80 sec, f/45.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Reaching for Spring”

“Reaching for Spring”

“Treasure the people who are willing and able to help you reach your goals.”
― Jeffrey Fry

The title for this image came so easily. As I hiked the forest path, I noticed these small red leaves beginning to unfurl, backlit by the late afternoon sun. As I composed the shot, I could not help but envision them as delicate hands, reaching for something.

The wide aperture of my 90 mm macro lens also created a wonderful soft bokeh in the background, isolating the bud in the foreground, yet leading the eye back along the slightly blurred stem to which it is attached.

It’s a scene that’s playing out everywhere in my area right now. Though still cooler than I’d like, nature continues its cycle of rebirth and presents me daily with new experiences and treasures.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“First Bloodroot of the Season”

“First Bloodroot of the Season”

“In this delicate and unpredictable life, the future is unwritten. Do not take someone for granted today, for once tomorrow dawns upon the indigo night the only remaining trace will be tracks in the sand…”
― Virginia Alison

I really appreciate this wonderful, short-lived spring blossoms. The burst forth quickly in mid-April, bloom brightly for a few days and then are gone, a mere memory of the first warm days of spring.

Because of their brief beauty, I make a point of seeking them out every year, hoping to capture the spirit of this beautiful plant.

They are quite unique, as they emerge from the ground as small tube-like plants and then open up their green ‘capes’, revealing the delicate white flowers inside. It’s almost magical to me. I hoping to get back out again for a few more images before they fade, as the poem above, leaving only a faint trace of their existence.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/125 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

TUESDAYS OF TEXTURE | WEEK 16 OF 2017

“Under the Fall”

“Under the Fall”

Here is my entry for Del Monte Y Mar’s Tuesdays of Texture Challenge Week 16 of 2017.

The ‘texture’ of water. The rolling structure and varying colour is what caused me to make this photo of teh churning water below a local dam. I wasn’t sure if i’d use it for a Tuesday Texture submission, by the more I looked at it the more I was compelled to do so.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/1250 sec, f/3.5, ISO 100