Tag Archives: ontario

“Swamp Maples” – Prince Edward County

“Swamp Maples” - Prince Edward County, Ontario

“It’s the unusual, the ‘out of place’ that gets our attention and prompts us to ask questions.”
– Ed Lehming 

While driving through Prince Edward County, a large peninsula in south-eastern Ontario, some of the main roads run through a fairly large patch of marshland, rather, swamp, since it is filled with shrubs and trees. What makes this so unique is that the swamps, which seem to be wet all year round are filled with large maple trees, primarily red and silver maple, which don’t seem to mind getting their feet wet in what is locally known as “The Big Swamp”.

The rest of the ‘County’ is rolling farmland with the occasional patch of low brush or juniper, as well as many of Ontario’s emerging wineries. The ‘County” is becoming a very popular destination, mostly because of its proximity to Toronto, its quaint villages, picturesque landscape, and a spectacular provincial park known as “Sandbanks” made up of miles of soft sand-dunes jutting into Lake Ontario.

Among this diverse landscape, I keep coming back to the central swamp, because it’s so out of place to me. I’ve been here many times over the past few years but until a few days ago, did not take the time to stop and photograph them. The trees you see in this photo stretch on for hundreds of meters into the swamp, but the thicker summer foliage obscurs much of that, so a trip back in autumn is definitely going to happen.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/20.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Roadside Bliss” – North Hastings, Ontario

“Roadside Bliss” - North Hastings, Ontario

“One does not have to travel to far flung and remote places to find beauty. We simply need to open ourselves up to see it, by expecting it, in our daily journeys.”
– Ed Lehming

In line with my recent “Along the Way” theme, here’s another roadside treasure that I captured on my recent drive from Bancroft, Ontario to Picton. This stretch of Highway 62, north of the farmlands of Madoc, leads us through some near north Canadian Shield wilderness which is so typical of the North Hastings region. This same landscape continues north to Ontario’s Algonquin Park and beyond and can be easily enjoyed from the highway.

The rocky terrain, filled with pines, small lakes, and swamps goes on for miles in the same pattern and most travelers take it for granted,simply driving through it, focussed on a destination, when the journey is just as beautiful.

This small, roadside lake is called Spring Lake and I simply loved the serene little island with its tall pines and backdrop of fluffy summer clouds. I see these scenes all the time as I’m driving, enjoying them and envisioning a possible photograph, but often fail to stop. Or, I’ll see the scene and the angle or light has changed enough by the time I pull over that the composition is lost as a memory. This one worked out.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 122 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Rolled Gold” – Yelverton, Ontario

“Rolled Gold” - Yelverton, Ontario

“Summer progresses and the fruits of our labours and those of others, begin to yield, as evidenced by the bounty of the farm fields.”
– Ed Lehming

I should really call this recent series of images “Images Along the Way” since all have been taken from the roadside or not too far off the road on my travels to and from my camper.

This scene was absolutely marvelous and I simply had to stop and try to capture the scale and beauty of the massive field of rolled straw near the small community of Yelverton, Ontario. The field rolls far into the distance and is filled with hundreds of bales of straw. The immensity of the field is further complimented by wonderful late afternoon sunlight breaking through a thining deck of rain clouds.

It was not long after I made this image that the skies once again opened up into torrential rain, so I’m even happier for the brief break in the weather that allowed this image to be created.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 110 mm
1/640 sec, f/13.0, ISO 1250

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Into the North” – Youngs Point

"Into the North" - Youngs Point

“The most beautiful things happen, along the way. Stop and enjoy them.”
– Ed Lehming

Today, I’m doing a quick post and starting to get myself back into the discipline of posting and writing about my photos more frequently. I realized just how much I had dropped from my routine.

I had a significantly disruptive life event in March, which pulled the rug out from under me, creatively. I may talk about that at some point, as I continue to process it. Needless to say, the event caused me to stop doing the thing I love. Namely, photography.

It’s a strange thing that I fell away from the very thing that has always been my outlet and refuge through all the stresses life throws at us.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve done the very thing that I encourage others to do. Simply stop and enjoy all the beautiful things along the way.

The image above was taken from the side of the highway on our way north to our camper. I’d been admiring the thunderstorms on the horizon for some time, but there was never a good view from places where it was safe to stop. Finally, I found a short opening that offered this view of the clouds, lit up bright pink by the setting sun.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 1250

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“The One That Got Away”

“The One That Got Away”

“As I stepped over the slippery rock, making sure of my footing, the Heron launched itself into the sky from it’s shoreline perch, fading quickly across the lake.”
– Ed Lehming

This is why a chose landscape and botanical photography as my go-to. I have, on the rare occasion made a good wildlife photo. Those photos are more the result of being in the right place at the right time when an opportunity presents itself. Most often, the wildlife is fleeing or gone already.

I have a special respect for the work that goes into being a successful and consistent wildlife photographer. It involves days of preparation, scouting, and immeasurable patience and practice to get the shot that presents the wildlife correctly in its natural environment.

As my past few posts have indicated, I was actually on my way to photograph Burleigh Falls. On my way I encountered wonderful plants, a chipmunk, and almost two herons. Both herons surprised me, as I was not expecting them along the edge of this fast flowing waterfall. I’m used to herons along the calm shores of lakes and ponds. I actually startled them both, because the rush of the water masked the sound and movement of my approach. In fact, they started me as they launched themselves into the air to escape.

This is the better shot of the two, as I was able to quickly focus on the heron as it faded away. The other shot was out of focus. The other factor here was I has only carrying  my 90mm macro lens, which is great for flowers but a bit more challenging for wildlife o the move.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/640 sec, f/8.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Early Meadow Rue”

“Early Meadow Rue” - Thalictrum dioicum

“The soft spring breezes played with the tiny flowers of the plant causing then to dance and twinkle in the light.”
– Ed Lehming

As I’ve said a few times in the past, one of the great things about being a photographer is having an eye for the fine details. I’ve found myself becoming an astute observer, noticing things that I would have passed by a few years ago.

These smallish plants grow along the trails and are not particularly eye catching, until the blossoms appear in early spring. In this case, a male plant with dangling yellow flowers. I did not notice any female plants, which have bluish-purple flowers, in the area, but my timing may have been off by only a day. It’s interesting that there are two distinct plants, male and female. The species name: dioicum comes from the Greek word that means ‘two households”.

So, I have discovered another plant to research and to be on the lookout for next year, leading me to be able to make even better photos of them when I know when to expect them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/250 sec, f/9.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Starflower (Lysimachia borealis)

Starflower (Lysimachia borealis)

“Delicate white flowers hover above the deep green leaves as the next wave of spring flowers emerges, replacing trilliums and bloodroot. The canopy overhead thickens, and filters the light that makes it to the forest floor. Starflowers now add drops of brilliant white into the deepening gloom of the undergrowth.”
– Ed Lehming

As the trilliums mature and fade to soft pinks and magenta, the forest floor is once more transformed. The light is now filtered by maturing leaves. I’ve been noticing the starflowers along the trails for a few weeks now. They are quite unique with their seven pointed leaves.

They seemed to sit there, poised to bloom but needing a bit more warmth to start the cycle. Yesterday, they all seemed to bloom at once, the forest filled with these lovely small white flowers.

Here I was able to capture a group of three, growing on a moss covered stump and touched by a narrow shaft of sunlight. It was a good day to be in the forest, the air was filled with a warm and gentle breeze and the mosquitoes and blackflies were pretty much absent, a blessing at this time of year, especially when getting down low to make photos of the smaller wildflowers.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/60 sec, f/9.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com