Tag Archives: orange

“Open Faced”

“Open Faced”

“Your face is marked with lines of life, put there by love and laughter, suffering and tears. It’s beautiful.”
― Lynsay Sands

I’m having a strange fascination with flowers past their prime. The colours and textures seem to intensify, albeit briefly, as they dry out, just prior to falling from the stem. Some, seem to hang on for quite a while, while others fall off at the slightest touch.

The tulip above has captured my attention for the past several days, as it sat on our kitchen table, slowly changing form. The grooves in the petals became more pronounced, as the petals dehydrated. The flower’s ‘face’ opened up more and more, to the point where it was almost flat. I looked at it today and the petals are pulled right back, just hanging on.

It’s also one of the trio I shared earlier in the week.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

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“Best Before…”

“Best Before...”

“One by one they were all becoming shades. Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age.”
― James Joyce

This was a spur of the moment photo of three tulips from my garden, which graced my table last week. I watched as they cycled between open , during the day, and closed, by night. Each day the open cycle became more pronounced and after a while, the hardly closed at all.

Yesterday, I noticed that they opened wider than they had in the past and were looking a bit past their prime. I came up with the title for the image before I made it, seeing the blossoms as part their ‘best before’ date.

It was fun shooting the grouping from various angles and lighting setups and just as I snapped the last frame, the yellow tulip dropped two of its petals. That made me smile, having literally captured the very last moments of the show, which was best before.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Poised for Flight”

“Poised for Flight”

The two hardest tests on the spiritual road are the patience to wait for the right moment and the courage not to be disappointed with what we encounter.”
― Paulo Coelho

I’m clearly missing the colours and warmth of summer as I sit here watching winter slowly grip the land. This photo was made in mid-September while I was out looking for wildflowers to photograph. But, being  ever the photo-opportunist I decided that this lone monarch butterfly was a good subject as well, as it gently and randomly floated around me, eventually landing just off the trail.

Those who photograph butterflies on a regular basis, you know who you are, can relate to the  time and patience required to get a good shot. In their natural environment,these skittish little beings simply to not sit still, nor do they land in close proximity to the photographer. They flit and float around on the breeze with no predictable pattern or destination, often not even landing. So we need to ‘sneak’ up on them, trying carefully not to disturb them, lest they take to flight again.

That’s why this photograph is so representative of the butterfly ‘quest’. They seem to be always ‘Poised for Flight’. Just as you compose the shot and all is perfect, off they go again. When all the elements fall in place, the wind is calm, and nothing disturbs them, a good shot is finally achieved.

Next time you look at a beautiful butterfly image, realize that a lot of effort probably went into creating the shot and it’s probably the only one in many that was satisfactory.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Visions of Autumn – Orange Maple”

“Visions of Autumn - Orange Maple”

“And that afternoon, as the sun slanted low through the changing autumn leaves, I remembered to savor the moment, soak in the beauty, breathe deeply and feel the immensity of God.”
― Cindee Snider Re

The next component to nature’s fall palette around here is orange. Interestingly, when I got closer to this branch for a bright orange maple tree, I found a surprising amount of green and yellow, with patches of red and orange. The result, when viewed from a distance is a blazing orange.

This tree, in it’s entirety, can be seen in a post I made of few days ago (it’s the large tree near the back of the group).

I’m quite enjoying this study series and hoping the colours don’t fade before I can build a good collection of images. Bt with autumn, we can only hang on for so long and then it’s gone. I’m hoping for an extension like we had last year. Fingers crossed.

Nikon D800
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.6 @ 70mm
1 .3 sec, f/25.0, ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px:

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“Monarch and Woodland Sunflowers”

“Monarch and Woodland Sunflowers”

“It is strange how new and unexpected conditions bring out unguessed ability to meet them.”
― Edgar Rice Burroughs

I did not set out to photograph flowers or butterflies this day. I was hoping to catch the Atlantic Salmon run at the Whitevale dam. I’ve gone there in the spring many times and have had good success with photographing the rainbow trout migration. However, I have yet to witness the salmon run which happens in the fall along the same creek. I will have to keep checking back.

What did happen on this hike was I found myself in a deep grove of woodland sunflowers that towered over my head. I made a few photos of them but the scale was lost in the photo. As a came around a bend in the creek, which ran right next to me, I looked up and saw this monarch butterfly resting peacefully on one of the sunflowers. I never did get a clear shot of him, but the photo above was one of the better views. It’s these unexpected moments that keep me constantly learning about my camera and to be prepared for any eventuality, lest I miss it, and the moment becomes mere memory.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Day Lily with Seeds”

“Day Lily with Seeds”

“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.”
― Lao Tzu

As the summer continues, the plants begin to mature and change form. Some wither and dry up, others go to seed, while some continue to flourish till the air cools. This day lily was pretty much the start of my journey down the road of fine art floral photography and has opened a whole new creative world for me.

I thought it had stopped blooming about a week ago, but to my surprise, it had one blossom left to share. It’s quite mature and this image shows two seed pods beginning to develop as well as the ‘stubs’ where blossoms used to be.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/4 sec, f/14.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com