Tag Archives: park

“Intrusion”

“Intrusion”

“Nature knows no pause in progress and development, and attaches her curse on all inaction.  “
– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

The title for this image came to me immediately. It is driven by the essence of ‘how’ I photograph. I refrain from most things man-made. Sometimes it can be as innocuous as a well groomed path through the woods, preferring to imagine things as purely as possible, untouched by humans, rare though that is nowadays.

In this image, part of my recent “Papineau Bend” series, a stone BBQ pit stands in the forefront, an intruder to this lovely place. Yet, at some point in time, the fire pit was built for the enjoyment of families who visited this peaceful sanctuary along the shores of Papineau Creek. Were it not for this park being carved from the woods I may never have discovered this place. Time has had its effect on the park though and the BBQ is showing definite signs that nature will eventually have her way, through a gradual and unrelenting wearing down. Frost, rain, roots, and various plants are creating ever widening cracks in the cement, offering larger footholds for nature to pry apart the stonework, returning it to the earth.

Despite the intrusion, the overall scene of the pines remains one of beauty that I wanted to share through another of my photo abstractions, bright, late summer sunshine lighting up the delicate needles of the pines and hemlocks. Just reflecting back on the moment when I made this image lightens my heart and beckons me back to this place, intrusions or not.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

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“Cool Runnings” – Papineau Creek

“Cool Runnings” - Papineau Creek

“The river moved so swiftly and yet it had no purpose other than to flow, just flow.”
― Gioconda Belli

During a recent backcountry drive, I tried to retrace my route to a little gem of a park I found a few years back. There is no road sign identifying the park, just an unmarked road that leads to a beautiful groomed park on the shores of Papineau Creek, near Maynooth, Ontario.

Just before the creek enters the park area, it flows through a short set of rapids. On a hot summer day this was a nice spot to stop and cool down by the water, make some photos, and just enjoy the refreshing sound of the water as it gurgles over the rocks.

It was quite a bright day and without a neutral density filter,  it look a bit of effort to get my shutter speed down enough to soften the flow of the water. I used strategic timing of passing clouds to finally get the results I was after, keeping the rocks nice and sharp and highlighting the movement of the water.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 110 mm
1 sec, f/32.0, ISO 125

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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ONE WORD PHOTO CHALLENGE: CANDID

Keeping Score - Old Quebec 2012

Here’s my entry for Jennifer’s One Word Photo Challenge with the topic of Candid. This photo is one of my first posts for 2016 and has been a favourite of mine since I made the photo several years ago.

if you are interested in the story, please check out the original post.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300 mm f/4.4-5.6, @ 300 mm
1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO 450

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Redbud & Rockery” – Edwards Gardens, Toronto

“Redbud and Rockery” - Edwards Gardens, Toronto

“Spring returns, resplendent in pinks and white. Trees and shrubs glow in the sun, bedecked in bright blossoms and pale green leaves. The world awakens;  the eternal cycle repeats. – Ed Lehming

As I mentioned in my last post, I have not been to this botanical gardens since I was a young child. It was so nice to see all the blossoming trees. I was especially surprised to see redbuds, since I was not aware that they could survive this climate. However, there were many specimens thriving here, including this trailing variety, artfully draped over a stone wall.

The soft pink blossoms against the gray stones are what first drew my eye to the scene and then it was just a matter of framing the shot effectively.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Study in Wood #5” – Bryant Park, New York

Study in Wood #5

“Every tree in the forest has a story to tell. Some of them were burnt but they endured the fire and got revived; some of them were cut, their barks injured, some people pick up their leaves to make medicines for their sicknesses, birds used their leaves to make their nests, etc. Upon all these, the tree is still tree!”
― Israelmore Ayivor

This ancient sycamore, in New York City’s Bryant Park, certainly would have stories to tell. I have no idea how old it might be, but someone planted it behind the New York Public library many years ago and it has borne silent witness to a multitude events and changes in its long life. This old wood has weathered time and endured, its bark rough and creased with age, unlike its younger companions with their smooth, mottled bark, so typical of the fast growing sycamores, planted in neat rows in this urban park.

Pieces of bark have fallen off, been broken off, revealing the bright layers below, or clung tight to the tree, growing dark and gray with the patina of time.

As the quote above says, every forest has its story to tell. I look on these gnarled old trees and decaying stumps, thinking back to when they were young saplings. These are the survivors, having outlived other lesser trees, every year marked in their rough and ragged bark.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 125 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 -1.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Mature Alder Catkins”

“Mature Alder Catkins”

“Given the right lighting, all the colors in the world can be seen in a white object.”
– Michele Cooper

This time of year tends to be fairly challenging as far as finding interesting things to photograph. The ground tends to be muddy and accessing some areas is tough. There’s also the prevalence of browns and grays with very few bright colours. Yet, if I look around, I can still find some worthwhile subjects. In this case, the mature seed pods, or ‘catkins’ of a hazel tree growing in a local park. And, I was blessed with beautiful spring light, though spring is still a few short days away.

I liked the texture of the catkins and I though this particular composition had some potential, as I narrowed my depth of field to isolate on cluster. While my primary subject was the catkins, all sorts of bright colours emerged from the background as I processed the image. This made the photo even more appealing to me, as the background looks like some colourful drop sheet, and nothing like what appeared to be a mundane background when I made the image. Light always offers surprises.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Alder Creek Cascade” – Yosemite National Park

Alder Creek Cascade

This remains one of my favourite photos. Partially because it was just a chance, unplanned, opportunity and secondly due to the sense of serenity it instills in me.

The unplanned aspect of this photo was that I was travelling to the Yosemite Valley proper, with the intention of photographing some of Yosemite’s grand waterfalls. On the trip in, I happened to glance over my shoulder into one of the many steep ravines that the road crosses. I noticed a small cascade and pulled the car over to have a closer look.

As I descended into the gully, I was greeted by this gorgeous scene of Alder Creek flowing over and around the moss-covered boulders. I was especially drawn to the water flowing lightly across the round boulder in the foreground.

I find myself going back to this image time and again when I need to wind down. As a photographer, I’m finding more often, that these chance encounters, with my natural surroundings, provide more satisfying and unique images than some of the grand vistas.

I hope you enjoy it too.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm @ 70mm
0.4sec @ f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming