Tag Archives: patterns

“Progression” – Hosta Blossom

“Progression”

“Peculiar I say, how so often the smallest, most seemingly insignificant details later unveil their faces as vital means for progression.” 
― Criss Jami

What struck me about this image of a stem of hosta blossoms was the progression of the flowers along the stem. The bottom three are spent flowers from the previous day, the next two above are in full bloom, and above, new blossoms are forming.

I’ve considered photographing them before, but they have not appealed to me, for some reason. Yet, this time around, I really noticed this pattern of blossoms, progressing up the stem and decided to document it and spend some time appreciating it. The individual blossoms are quite pretty as well, yet seem lost in the space between them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.5 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Coleus II”

“Coleus II”

“There are patterns which emerge in one’s life, circling and returning anew, an endless variation of a theme” 
― Jacqueline Carey

As humans, we are programmed to see patterns, and nature provides us much to see. This coleus, has been growing in my office since late October of last year. I see it every day, as I come to my desk or look out the window. The plant is quite large now, large enough that the weight of the leaves is enough to make it unbalanced in the small pot it was planted in and many of the leaves are very, very large.

So, yesterday, I considered what to do with the plant, which has been ever present these past few months. As I was considering this, I became keenly aware of the repeating pattern of it leaves, especially the bright, fresh leaves of new growth. Of course, I could not resist making a photo of it, so I could appreciate it even more. I did take it into my studio, as the light from the office window was not ideal.

Now, as I look more carefully at the leaves, and their patterns, I’m fascinated by not just the repeating pattern of the layered leaves but also the great texture and colour patterns. You don’t have to go very far to find interesting things to photograph, you just have to be aware of them, even if they have been in front of you for months.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.3  sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Tuesdays of Texture – “Beneath the Fall”

“Beneath the Fall”

This is what froth below a local waterfall looks like when it freezes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/40 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“White Spotted Butterfly” – Secord Forest

“White Spotted Butterfly” 0 Secord Forest

“Only when we pay attention and notice small moments, do we make the connections that lead to a change in our perspective.”
― Andrea Goeglein

It’s pretty amazing what you see over a 5km forest hike, especially in a forest as diverse as Secord Forest. Which, fortunately for me, is only a few kilometers from my home, which makes it a super convenient place to go, without a lot of preparation.

Back to the woods, as it were. I’ve gone there a few times over the past few weeks, constantly amazed at how fast the forest goes from its brown, dead, winter form, to a verdant explosion of life and ongoing cycle of growth, blooms, and thriving wildlife.

Lately, with all the blossoming flowers, butterflies have been bountiful. I must admit, that I had no idea just how many different species are native to these woods. I am familiar with the common varieties, like Monarchs, Mourning Cloaks, and the multitude of Coppers and Skippers. Yet, there are vast numbers of tiny butterflies that barely catch your attention, till you stand and watch for movement between the plants.

This specimen eluded my attempts at a photograph for quite some time, but I finally got a good image of its spectacular colours. It’s so small, about the size of a thumbnail, that I did not notice the bright yellow shoulder patches till I looked at the image on my computer. I did spend a bit of time looking up the actual name, but among thousands of butterfly species, I finally gave up and simply named it by its appearance. If there are  butterfly enthusiasts out there who can enlighten me on the species, that would be greatly appreciated.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/180 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“OISE Windows” – Toronto

“OISE Windows” - Toronto

“Humans are pattern-seeking story-telling animals, and we are quite adept at telling stories about patterns, whether they exist or not.”
― Michael Shermer

OISE is the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, part of the University of Toronto. This is where people study to be ‘educators’ or ‘teachers’ as we know them. It is also where trends in education are studied and public policy, regarding education in Ontario, originates. I have several friends who are teachers and they have shared some interesting OISE stories with me. In the parlance of ‘teacher speak’ such gems as “Oracular Device for Conveyance of Knowledge” aka ‘a book’, came from this building.

Despite the reputation for over thinking the obvious, the building is quite interesting, architecturally and I was particularly drawn to the patterns of the windows in the mid-afternoon light as I walked along Bloor Street looking for new material. I tend to enjoy old buildings and complex stonework, but I did find this modern image interesting because of the repeating patterns and limited gradations of shading.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 145 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com