Tag Archives: perseverance

“Monarch on Purple Coneflower”

“Monarch on Purple Coneflower”

“There are times to stay put, and what you want will come to you, and there are times to go out into the world and find such a thing for yourself.” 
― Lemony Snicket

For the past several days, I’ve watched one or two monarch butterflies on my purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpura) and I have not had my camera handy. By the time I gathered my camera and got outside, it seems the butterflies had flown off. Or, they fly off as I slowly approach the flowerbed, not to return that day, to my knowledge.

Today, fortune was with me. I was on my way to gather a blossom to photograph in my studio and I noticed a Monarch as busy feasting on the flower’s nectar, along with many honeybees. Once more, I did not have my camera with me and, once again, I went inside to get it. On my return the butterfly was still on the flower, but flew away as I approached. I decided to wait it out by photographing the blossoms and the bees, seeing the butterfly floating around in my periphery. Well, it paid off, and the butterfly, unable to resist this large cluster of Echinacea, returned once more and gave me the opportunity to snap a few shots before taking off once more. This is one of the three images I made while it fed.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/10.0, ISO 320

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Barred Owl”

barred-owl-ii

“The owl,” he was saying, “is one of the most curious creatures. A bird that stays awake when the rest of the world sleeps. They can see in the dark. I find that so interesting, to be mired in reality when the rest of the world is dreaming. What does he see and what does he know that the rest of the world is missing?”
― M.J. Rose

Today’s post is inspired by a fellow photoblogger, Victor Rakmil  and his latest post, featuring a Barred Owl and his own experience photographing these lovely creatures.

Above is a photo I made a few years ago, but one of my most prized ones. Those of you who lean towards wildlife photography will understand why this is so. You see, most of those spectacular images you see in National Geographic and other similar magazines are the result of hours of preparation, and many, many failed attempts to even find the animal, and then, get the shot right. Because, there is seldom a second chance.

Owls, are especially elusive, being night dwellers, they tend to perch high up in trees, under dense cover. So, even when you are looking for them, they are tough to spot. On rare occasions, they remain in the same area for some time and a fortunate birder or photographer happens to find it.

That’s what happened here. A photographer friend of mine began posting images of this Barred Owl on his Facebook page. The images were quite spectacular and made from a fairly close distance. So, I asked him where the photos were made. Reluctantly, he told me, asking that I not share this information with others, which I agreed to.

The next day, I set out to the ‘secret place’ to see if I could spot the owl. Well, about twenty other photographers had already heard about the place and were gathered around the owl, which was perched and sleeping, in an apple tree.  We were all happy to see the owl this close up, but disappointed that it was not opening its eyes, despite the commotion around it. I was also pleased that nobody was stupid enough to throw something to wake it up (one guy suggested it and was quickly told “No!”)

I made several photos, just happy to have seen an owl in the wild, that close up. They are spectacular creatures.

A few days later, I returned, during a weekday, and found only a few photographers and birders present and the owl awake. It had just flown to the ground after a mouse and proceeded to eat it, as the cameras snapped. Then, it flew back up into a tree and rested, satisfied with its morning meal.

That’s where this composition came to life. The owl chose, for a change, to sit in the open, perfectly lit, and wonderfully framed by the branches, soft green cedars in the background. I think I made about fifty images, not wanting to miss this opportunity. The image above is my favourite and I still look at this branch, sans owl, whenever I return to the ‘secret place’, but I’ve never experienced this moment again.

Now that I have a bit better equipment and am more comfortable with it, I’m hoping to catch one in flight this year. Fingers crossed.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Purity” – White Cosmos

"Purity" - White Cosmos“The light of love, the purity of grace,
The mind, the Music breathing from her face,
The heart whose softness harmonised the whole —
And, oh! that eye was in itself a Soul!”
― George Gordon Byron

At this time of the season, when plants begin to wilt from the exertions of the summer, the cosmos still perseveres, brightening my gardens with their snow white purity and diaphanous petals.

I see the cosmos as such a pure and delightful plant. It’s so delicate, you’d think the petals would break or fold to the touch, yet they don’t. They weather the heat, the storm, and the wind, retaining their beauty and I’m glad to see a survivor.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm with 20mm macro extender
2.0 sec, f/18.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“North Hastings Farm Field” – Fort Stewart

“North Hastings Farm Field” - Fort Stewart, Ontario

“There are times to stay put, and what you want will come to you, and there are times to go out into the world and find such a thing for yourself.”
― Lemony Snicket

This image was made last weekend in a small town in Central Ontario called Fort Stewart. It’s a small community in the high hills of the North Hastings Highlands that if it wasn’t for the ancient stands of pine and maple and dark rivers you would think you were in West Virginia. It’s a rugged part of Ontario and one would not think productive farms could exist, yet they do. Through ingenuity and sheer determination, the early settlers were able to produce scant crops among the rocks. Enough so to warrant the building of towns with schools and churches, which remain to this day.

Through it’s unique geology, a small area or arable land formed here. Most of the farms are used as pasture land or to grow hay, but I have seen a few decent corn fields as well.

This hay field caught my attention and is directly across the road from the colt image I shared yesterday and about a mile from the deer I posted the day before that. I suppose it’s the anomaly of a hay field in this northern community that resonated with me. It seems almost out of place and would seem better suited to ore southern climes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com