Tag Archives: perspective

“Be Still…”

“Be Still...”

“In transitions, we must learn to be still. Being still is, in part, about learning to be comfortable with ambiguity.”
― Janet Rebhan

These are the words that echo through my head, as I consider this recent image and the events over the past several months and yesterday evening. I find myself standing here once more, drinking in the beauty and the quiet, as the world goes on about me. But here, in this place, in this moment, I am still. I am still and the quiet of the forest surrounds me, nourishes me, makes me aware of its life. In this small part of my world, I am at peace.

The contrast between the dark tree trunks and the bright sun soaked forest floor, as well the bright green ferns, still lush among the fallen leaves, makes me consider all the extremes we are faced with and how they can coexist in this small, quiet place and make the whole scene beautiful.

Be Still…, also echoes the verses of a favourite hymn, and reminds me that I am part of an incredible creation and that there is peace in faith as well.

This is my refuge, my quiet place, and affords me the ability to be still, even though I can’t be there right now. I’m hoping this little glimpse affords you that stillness as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 75 mm
1/4 sec, f/14.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Let Me Get This Straight”

“Let Me Get this Straight”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
― William Blake

At first, this image was in my ‘discard’ pile. The bend and tilt of the trees bothered me and I could not get it ‘straight’. I realized that the wobble , though distracting to me,  was OK and that there were wonderful textures and movement in this image once I reconsidered the image as a whole.

This image was made on the same day as the rest of what I am now referring to as my “God-light” series. As you can see, the sunlight is abundant and the forest floor is strewn with golden leaves. Yet, small patches of green still linger. A beautiful day to absorb this scene.

This got me considering how many other things and people we may relegate to our ‘discard’ pile when first impressions discomfort us. In future, I intend to remind myself of this image and consider the many reasons how these trees got their bend in the first place.

I love the quote: “Art, brings comfort to the disturbed and disturbs the comfortable”.
I find it becoming a bit of a mantra for me of late.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/5sec, f/14.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Stand”

“Stand”

“If I am brave enough to stand against those who have been groomed by fear, I will recognize that where I get knocked down is all about where life begins, and has nothing to do with where it ends.”
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

Although not as bright and sunshiney as my previous images, this one still echoes the spirit of the forest and provides me with thoughts on life and my world. As filtered sunlights drifts down from above, filtered green and yellow, and falls in patches on the leaf strewn ground, shadows reach out, and certain trees show their own particular colours, some bright gold, while others reflect the sky in muted blues, and others loom darkly. In the background, bright sunlight reflects from bright yellow leaves. The trees ‘stand’ tall in the forest reaching towards the sunshine, encircling the brown leaves.

A ‘stand ‘ is also an expression for a group of trees, particularly aspens, who share common root system. While not the case here, with the mix of pine, maple, and oak. I still like the name because it instills multiple images in my mind.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/20.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Common Burdock”

“Common Burdock”

“Do not allow any negativity or ugliness in your surroundings, or anybody at all, destroy your confidence or affect your growth as a blooming flower. It is very normal for one ugly weed to not want to stand alone.”
― Suzy Kassem

The bane of all dog owners and hikers. These ‘stick to everything’ seeds of the common burdock are really quite an ingenious way to transport seeds long distances. For those unfamiliar with ‘burrs’, the spiky balls are tipped with a hook, which easily catches on anything rubbing against the plant. The hooks cling with amazing force and are very difficult to remove. When long haired dogs run through a patch of these, the result for the dog owner is usually hours of manually picking the burrs from the animal’s fur.

The hooks work very well, and I believe are the inspiration for Velcro. This makes long distance seed dispersal possible since they do not easily dislodge, but rather, break off over time.

It’s interesting, especially when reflection on the quote I chose, that I had always seen burdock as a bit of an ‘ugly’ plant, though the blossoms in midsummer are quite pretty. Yet in the fall, they are brittle brown bushes. I found isolating the plant against the black background and using the right light brought out beauty, in even this  plant. Something to consider, in many contexts.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200mm
4.0 sec, f/22.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Red Clover”

“Red Clover”

“Every form of art is another way of seeing the world. Another perspective, another window. And science –that’s the most spectacular window of all. You can see the entire universe from there.”
― Claudia Gray

One of the benefits of this style of photography, for me at least, is noticing the intricate details in commonplace plants and flowers. This clover was growing wild along my neighbour’s lawn, which is significantly overgrown enough for wildflowers and weeds to go unmolested. As I was cutting my grass, I looked over at this ‘weed’ and wondered how it would look as a fine art photo.

Once grass cutting was completed and the light was better, I took my portable backdrop with me and proceeded to make a few images of the clover from a few angles. This one is my favourite, as it incorporates the fresh blossom as well as a slightly out of focus spent flower, almost as a reflection of itself.

Isn’t perspective an interesting thing? This overgrown lawn is an eyesore, filled with tall grass and a multitude of weeds, yet, when isolated to its individual components, it can be such a thing of beauty. Something to think about.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm (manual macro tubes)
1/15 sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Pink Clematis”

“Pink Clematis”

“The trick to forgetting the big picture is to look at everything close-up. The shortcut to closing a door is to bury yourself in the details. This is how we must look to God. As if everything’s just fine.”
― Chuck Palahniuk

Image number three in what has become my “Ordinary Flowers in a Different Light” series. Interestingly enough, this was a single blossom on one of my finicky clematis plants. They are strange in their blooming patterns. Some opening in May, while others have gone into November.

While the blossom is quite pretty, it tends to be a go-to garden plant and thus it’s been included in my “Ordinary Flowers” collection.

This studio photography experiment is quite enjoyable and is not something I saw myself gravitating towards. However, I do like the fine details this technique shows and really allows the plant to show off, as it were, without competing with their garden companions.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 140 mm
1/100 sec, f/14.0, ISO 6400

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“White Spotted Butterfly” – Secord Forest

“White Spotted Butterfly” 0 Secord Forest

“Only when we pay attention and notice small moments, do we make the connections that lead to a change in our perspective.”
― Andrea Goeglein

It’s pretty amazing what you see over a 5km forest hike, especially in a forest as diverse as Secord Forest. Which, fortunately for me, is only a few kilometers from my home, which makes it a super convenient place to go, without a lot of preparation.

Back to the woods, as it were. I’ve gone there a few times over the past few weeks, constantly amazed at how fast the forest goes from its brown, dead, winter form, to a verdant explosion of life and ongoing cycle of growth, blooms, and thriving wildlife.

Lately, with all the blossoming flowers, butterflies have been bountiful. I must admit, that I had no idea just how many different species are native to these woods. I am familiar with the common varieties, like Monarchs, Mourning Cloaks, and the multitude of Coppers and Skippers. Yet, there are vast numbers of tiny butterflies that barely catch your attention, till you stand and watch for movement between the plants.

This specimen eluded my attempts at a photograph for quite some time, but I finally got a good image of its spectacular colours. It’s so small, about the size of a thumbnail, that I did not notice the bright yellow shoulder patches till I looked at the image on my computer. I did spend a bit of time looking up the actual name, but among thousands of butterfly species, I finally gave up and simply named it by its appearance. If there are  butterfly enthusiasts out there who can enlighten me on the species, that would be greatly appreciated.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/180 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com