Tag Archives: pine

“Three?”

“Three?”

“You might as well ask an artist to explain his art, or ask a poet to explain his poem. It defeats the purpose. The meaning is only clear thorough the search.” 
― Rick Riordan

And this search goes on., as I embark on another series of photographic abstracts. Yet, despite the quote, I believe I am able to explain my art. I take great satisfaction in these ‘light paintings’.

I find that by adding the slight movement it disturbs the viewer just enough that they begin to pay attention to details that are often missed. As I study my own photos of the same scene, one, a still photo and the other, a slight pan, colours that are lost or subdued on the static photo seem more vibrant, more alive. I find the movement adds a dynamic that is not there in a still image.

Perhaps it’s just how I see things and this is a way for me to ‘realize’ them. It’s also a way for me to create art, using light and movement rather than a brush. It is very satisfying because I am creating something new, something that was not there before. It the creation that drives me, that combined with the fact that the images seem to resonate with the viewer.

It’s been interesting for me, since I started creating these images, that not once, has anybody said to me, “That’s just a blurry picture”. Most viewers are intrigued with the images, and I find them drawn deeper into the scene than with crisp, clean shots, which seem to briefly satisfy.

As yet, this new series remains unnamed, but that will come to me shortly. In the meantime, enjoy.

This particular image is named “Three?” because there are three dominant trees, but there is more to it, isn’t there? There are more than just the three trees, there are others in the periphery that count too, do they not?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD@75mm

1/4 sec, f/10.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

‘Autumn Creeps In”

‘Autumn Creeps In”

“At no other time (than autumn) does the earth let itself be inhaled in one smell, the ripe earth; in a smell that is in no way inferior to the smell of the sea, bitter where it borders on taste, and more honeysweet where you feel it touching the first sounds.” 
― Rainer Maria Rilke

I made this image on the final weekend of summer, along the shores of North Hastings’ Papineau Creek. Among the red pine and green maples, a bright splash of red reminds us, that despite the unseasonably warm temperatures we are currently experiencing, the cycle of seasons is inevitable.

The red fairly jumps out against the background, bright sunshine enhancing the effect. I believe these are Red Maple acer rubrum, which is aptly named. This year because other leaves have not quite started to change colour, the red maples stand out like crimson beacons. I say many along the highway the prior weekend but could not pull over for a good image. This one makes up for that to some degree.

As I look outside today, I see that fall is really beginning to advance, and the rest of the trees are joining in on what promises to be a spectacular, mild autumn.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Edge of Darkness”

“Edge of Darkness”

“Nature is a haunted house–but Art–is a house that tries to be haunted.” 
― Emily Dickinson

Every now and then the gently winding path leads along or within patches of dark pine forest. These mighty trees rise from the ground and weave their branches into a tight canopy, blocking out most of the light. The space below is an eternal twilight filled with dead branches and a thick carpet of pine needles. Despite this, small green shoots struggle for a patch of sunlight, sheltered from the elements in this dark environment.

Along the edge of these groves of pines, bright sunshine warms the ground and plants flourish, creeping as close to the pines as possible, seeking shelter from the wind yet far enough away to catch the sunshine, like a person walking close to buildings to avoid the rain.

The contrast between the dark pines and the bright path is what inspired this image, the characteristics of the light visibly different once you slide back to the pines, where a golden light predominates.

As the quote above so eloquently puts it: Nature ‘is’ and art attempts to communicate the elements which makes it what it is. Through my abstract photos, I attempt to bring some of those elements of life into the image through deliberate movement.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/18.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Late Summer Warmth”

“Late Summer Warmth”

“The tremendous pines towering above the dark marshy soil resembled a gathering of severe mute brothers from a forbidden ancient order worshiping forgotten gods no one had ever heard of outside of the world of secret occult visions.” 
― Simona Panova

As I went for a long hike last Sunday, looking for inspiration for my next photo series, I found myself in a large expanse of cultivated red pines. These trees would have been planted in the mid sixties to reclaim farmland as conservation areas were created.

The conservation areas were created not only for recreation but as a strategy to control floodwater flow after hurricane Hazel flooded destroyed areas outside and within the city of Toronto. Given current events in Houston and Florida, I take comfort that people had the foresight to create a flood control measures. By planting forests, ground erosion is greatly reduced and the forests also cool the air, not to mention all the other elements like wildlife habitat and so on.

I’ve stood among these pines before, and made a few images, but decided that late summer would be a nice time to start a series of pine forest images titled “Among the Pines”. My first few shots featured a lot of golden brown, like the one above, but as I proceeded to hike and photograph, a surprising amount of green plays into the images as well. Since this is a planted forest, it is also managed, and so, the forest is ‘thinned’ out every few years, to encourage growth in the trees and allow light to shine between the trees, which brings on growth of ground cover and an array of colours and textures.

There are a lot of maple and beech saplings growing between the pines, which is a natural progression. It turns out, you can’t plant a maple forest. You have to plant pines first and the maples grow between them. Once you clear out the pines, after several years, the maples are established and take over. Something I did not know before.

So, here it is, image number one of the “Among the Pines” series. I hope you enjoy it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/14.0, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Among the Pines”

“Among the Pines”

“Travelling the road will tell you more about the road than Google will tell you about the road.”
― Amit Kalantri

My third installation from my autumn walk in the woods. Once more, the image was made in a very brief time frame when the sun shone brightly between the trees, lighting up the forest floor with an unbelievable ‘glow’. C.S Lewis referred to it as a “God-light” and I can’t think of a better term for it. There is a life and energy in this light that is so utterly profound. You want to stand there and just absorb it. The light strikes the trees, yet leaves barely a shadow, as it reflects softly within the forest.

It was one of those days you wish could go on forever because it is so awe inspiring. I was happy to have witnessed it and even happier to be able to keep some of it as more than just a memory. Something to share and, hopefully, brighten someone elses day, when they need a bit of light to get them through.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Old Barn” at Fraser Lake Camp

“Old Barn” at Fraser Lake Camp

This photo was made last November at Fraser Lake Camp, near Fort Stewart, Ontario. It is a wonderful children’s camp, established some 60 years ago. The Old Barn is the only original building still standing on the property. It’s all log construction and sits at the edge of a field, surrounded by planted pine forest. I found this to be a wonderfully serene image, full of transitions. The lines of dark clouds are harbingers of the winter to come, yet grass still shows through. There is snw on the ground, but it would stay for long, as the meager sun warms the ground. There is also a shift from agriculture to native forest.

I have found several other buildings like this is the area, which was hoped to provide farming opportunity at one time, but the soil is just too shallow to support any sustainable farming. There are still a few operating farms, mostly livestock and hay.

It is interesting also to see gradual transition to native hardwoods, as can be seen to the left and right, with encroaching birch trees and poplars. The world is full of change, some rapid and some that can only be observed over years and decades.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm f/5.6 @ 70mm
1/160 sec @ f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“End Of Darkness” – Fraser Lake Forest Abstract

End Of Darkness - Fraser Lake Forest Abstract

Another one of my “Trees” series of photo abstractions. This photo was made four years ago, at Fraser Lake Camp, near Bancroft, Ontario when I was just starting to play with this technique. I re-edited it last year because I was not happy with the ‘feel’ of the image. Again, it comes down to the strong vertical elements and good light. In this case, I was following a game trail and looked up to see the beautiful glow of sunshine on a single tree standing in the middle of the path. The surrounding trees were quite dark because it had just rained. The rain also made all the undergrowth nice and saturated with colour. For me the image is like the end of a journey through darkness into the brilliant warmth of daylight.

Nikon D200
Nikor 28-70mm f/3.5-4.5 @ 70mm
1/4 sec @ f/4.5, ISO 100