Tag Archives: pink

“Columbines from Mom”

“Columbines from Mom”

“Flowers will always try, and look their best, no matter what the season or reason.” 
― Anthony T. Hincks

Every spring I get to enjoy a gift from the past. My mother and I are both avid gardeners and sharing seeds connected us in a unique way by having some similar plants in our gardens. I live in Ontario and she lives in British Columbia, so our growing zones are quite different, so there is a limit to our ability to share. Many years ago, she shared the seeds of this particular plant with me, and it has grown in may garden ever since.

One in particular, that  has worked remarkably well for both of us is this variety of Columbine, which we referred to as Mountain Columbine is actually Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata ‘Nora Barlow’

This ‘frilly’ columbine, one of the so-called rose or clematis flowered aquilegias, where the sepals are doubled and the outer ones have an attractive green tinge. Nora Barlow was a granddaughter of Charles Darwin and this plant, popular for more than 300 years, was found growing in her garden by the nurseryman Allan Bloom.

So, there is also the pleasure of finding the history of our shared flowers, which likely came from her mother or grandmother. I never did ask where the seeds came from. Interestingly, hers did not propagate one year and she came to me asking if I could send some seeds back her way.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/400 sec, f/7.1, ISO 800

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Showy Lady Slipper – 2018”

“Showy Lady Slipper - 2018”

“The beauty of that June day was almost staggering. After the wet spring, everything that could turn green had outdone itself in greenness and everything that could even dream of blooming or blossoming was in bloom and blossom. The sunlight was a benediction. The breezes were so caressingly soft and intimate on the skin as to be embarrassing.” 
― Dan Simmons

Here we are, freshly into summer. I have found myself longing to get on the trails, to explore the changes the past month has brought. I sought to find the many groves of wildflowers, so familiar to me these past few years. Most of all, a craved the crunch of the ground beneath my boots and the sweet smells and familiar sounds of the forest.

Work has consumed my time, has left me drained and uninspired. I’ve been out walking,  in town, just to clear my mind and then back to the routine. My free time has been spendt simply trying to catch my breath and come down from the non-stop urgency of my job.

As I sat reviewing some of the photos from last year, it became clear to me that I was sacrificing something precious. I was abandoning the very thing that gives me energy and creativity. I was giving up being ‘in’ nature. How I got to this point is simple, it was a slow and steady increase in keeping up with the increasing demands of a job that requires years of acquired knowledge and a great deal of creativity, combined with increasingly tight deadlines. But, I have come to realize, that the pace is only sustainable for so long. I began feeling tired, irritable, and uninspired in other aspects of my life. A few times, I took the time to set up a studio shot or two, grabbed some quick images with my iPhone, but that was it.

As I sat looking at the calendar this past weekend, I realized that it was Orchid time. The brief period in late June when the Showy Lady Slipper Orchids bloom in a local conservation area. I simply had to get out to check on them. So today, I made a point of starting my day early and taking time at lunch to step away from the desk and into the forest. As soon as I stepped off the trailhead and into the forest, the outside world slid away around me and I felt the ‘oneness’ of the trail. Even the clouds of mosquitoes were welcome, though only briefly. I was blessed by a cooler day and a slight breeze, just enough to cool me and disperse the biting insects. Within 20 minutes I stood before these lovely flowers once more. The conditions were perfect and I was able to get the shots I wanted. It’s so good to be back!

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/200 sec, f/11.0, ISO 320

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pink Blush – Part II”

“Pink Blush - Part II”

“The truth is that everyday and everyone is different. We just like to think that they aren’t.” 
― Anthony T. Hincks

As promised, yesterday’s flower, with a light background. Keep in mind, this is the exact same shot, with the same settings and lighting. The only difference is that I removed the black velvet background that I use for my studio shots, revealing the white card-stock panel that holds it up in my portable setup.

I still prefer the black backdrop, as I feel it makes the image more dramatic, but the light background has its appeal too.

It’s very interesting, on several levels, how this works. What I’m looking at is so dramatically altered by the surroundings. Something to consider?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pink Blush”

“Pink Blush”

“Her blush was the color of a coral reef, but smooth.” 
― Aimee Bender

I simply love the many muted colours of spring. Understated blues, yellows, purples, and oranges, all make their appearance in the garden. Yet pink, as pale as a blush’s beginning appeals to me most. There is a natural softness to this colour, especially on these blossoms which move from a bright and warm yellow, through white and then terminate in pink, like some magical paintbrush.

I’m mixing things up a bit with my floral images, testing different backgrounds. My preference is still the black background, which makes even the most demure blossoms pop out of the background. And yet, I have been encourage by my family to try lighter colours as well.

I will post this same image tomorrow with a light background and the exact same camera settings and lighting. I look forward to your feedback.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Hi Resolution image on 500px: https://500px.com/photo/258419147/pink-blush-by-ed-lehming

 

“Spring Beauty and Twig”

“Spring Beauty and Twig”

“If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.” 
― Anne Bradstreet

As I mentioned in my previous post, the beginning of spring was more like an extended winter. It was the kind of year where you wonder if it will ever warm up, but it eventually does.

But, spring proper, has been delayed. As I walked familiar paths, it seemed like the world was still in winter’s icy clutches. A few patches of green were starting to show. Some hearty grasses and sedges gave an indication of life, yet it still felt so much like winter had just ended.

Then, I came across a grove of hardwoods and the forest floor was suddenly filled with the bright greens of wild leek plants, freshly erupted from the dull brown forest floor.. Now this was looking more familiar! If leeks were emerging, then what else?

I inspected the ground closer and, sure enough, I spotted a small patch of pink, up close to a maple tree; a small clump of Spring Beauties were blooming. Soon, I saw many more and the forest seemed alive with flowers. Which again reminded me, if you don’t look, intently, you will often miss these small treasures.

So, the 5 km. hike, simply for the sake of getting outside again, has paid off; colour is returning to the world once more and I am encouraged again to spend more time enjoying and photographing this wonderful world I live in.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm

1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“A Touch of Pink”

“A Touch of Pink”

A soul mate’s purpose is to shake you up, tear apart your ego a little bit, show you your obstacles and addictions, break your heart open so new light can get in, make you so desperate and out of control that you have to transform your life, then introduce you to your spiritual master…” 
― Elizabeth Gilbert

I gazed at this Queen Anne’s Lace flower in amazement. I had never noticed the pink frill. As I observed other, it became apparent that this was unique to one small patch, all the others were plain white.

What made this one particularly special was the slight heart shape, or am I imagining this?

The shape caused me to drift into the realm of emotion and life. My wife simply loves Queen Anne’s Lace and has made several lovely photos of the blossoms. That makes my photography expeditions so much nicer; having someone who also appreciates nature and photography, and is so incredibly supportive and encouraging of my journey into this art. This, of course, means infinite patience on drives, as I pull over to capture some roadside image, though she may not see it as I do. It means helping me overcome my self-doubt about my abilities, as she challenges me to be better than I believe I can be. As in the quote above from Eat, Pray, Love, she pushes me to be more, and for this, I am eternally grateful.

I truly believe that if it were not for her I would still be taking snapshots, suitable only for the family album, and nothing more. Instead, she has opened me up to sense the life and energy around me, by being a part of it. Thus enabling me to focus on the essence of what I am photographing.

Which brings me back to the image of the Queen Anne’s Lace blossoms, with its unusual pink frills, encircling an incredibly complex cluster of sub-blossoms. Each of the ‘pinks’ are small flower clusters as are the component bundles they surround.

Be sure you have a close look at this lovely blossom, go deep, and enjoy this moment captured on a recent summer morning. From the heart.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/16.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

 

“Purple Flowering Raspberry”

“Purple Flowering Raspberry  -Rubus odoratus”

“Saepe creat molles aspera spina rosas” – “Often the prickly thorn produces tender roses” 
― Ovid

This was a mystery plant to me, for a long time. On initial inspection, it looks like a wild rose, but the leaf is not right. It looks like a raspberry, but the flower is too big. So, what is it? Turns out, it’s a bit of both. It’s a flowering raspberry, and a member of the rose family. It’s also one of the larger trailside blossoms, so is easily located. The blossom colour varies considerably from pale purple to magenta, pink to almost white.

It’s also know, in some locations as Thimbleberry and is harvested to make preserves. I’ve tasted the berries, tentatively, thinking they might be raspberries, but found them to be very bitter and not to my liking. Maybe it makes a good jam thought? It would take a lot of berries and they are not overly plentiful.

When I looked back through all my images, I was surprised that I did not have many of this common blossom. So, it was time to make a fresh one and talk a bit about it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/160 sec, f/9.0 ISO 800

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com