Tag Archives: Rapids

“The Maddening Rush”

“The Maddening Rush” - Duffins Creek Thaw

“No reason for a feverish rush
For we will all arrive in the same place
At the right time. Justice will be served.
There will be no better or worse,
No big and small, no rewards, no punishment,
No guilt, no judges, no hierarchies;
Only silent equality.”
― Dejan Stojanovic

The image above could be a churning ocean or a stormy beach, but it’s a small section of creek below the falls at Whitevale, Ontario. I enjoyed the way the light played through water creating the glow from within the  wave. There’s an element to fast flowing water that I am drawn to. I like to play with my shutter speed, matching it to the flow of the water to convey this movement in my photos and I like how this one turned out because it shows the speed and surge of the water the way it appeared to me. A lot of water rushes through the rocks in this area just below the dam, creating a small section of low, but active set of rapids.

And after a short span in the tumult, the creek calms once more, around a gentle bend.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 90 mm
1/15 sec, f/32, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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http://www.edlehming.com

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“Granite and Water” – Burleigh Falls

"Granite & Water' Burleigh Falls

On a cold, dull November afternoon in 2014, I stopped for a few minutes at Burliegh Falls, a set of fairly intense rapids just off Highway#28 in the Kawartha Lakes region of Central Ontario, between Lower Buckhorn Lake, above and Stoney Lake, below.

It’s a very scenic location, easily accessible from the road, and therefore, very busy in the summer and early autumn. The rapids, adjacent shoreline, and calm pools below, are a destination for tourists, photographers, painters, swimmers, and fishermen.

The intensity of the rapids is dependant on the flow of water through a dam above them, designed to regulate water levels on the Trent-Severn canal system, parallel to the rapids. That November the flow was quite intense. This particular day was cold, windy, and overcast. Not ideal sightseeing conditions but, with the exception of the cold and wind, very nice for photography. The dull skies allowed me to make several long exposure images of the falls/rapids, including the one above, which I manipulated in Photoshop to look like a painting to get the effect I wanted to show. Again, for me it’s about how I see and experience things, rather than being simply an image in time. Don’t get me wrong, the original image is very nice as a photo, but did not communicate ‘how’ this scene unfolded for me at the time.

I’ve mentioned several times in the past that I can’t paint, but would love too. I like to look of the long brush strokes, the intense whites with hints of green and purple, and how it imparts so well the power of the water as it rushes by the far shore. The ‘painterly’ style, also intensifies the texture of the granite in the background. In my mind, this image captures the raw beauty of the province I live in and have the opportunity to enjoy and share.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300 mm, f/4.5-5.6 @ 75 mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

“Choices”

“Choices” - Duck in York River below High Falls Dam

You really never know what you will come across in your day. This past weekend I drove to High Falls, the source of Bancroft’s York River and  the terminus of Baptiste Lake. The dam there was built to prevent flooding of the town of Bancroft in the spring and features a beautiful, complex waterfall below the dam. There is a bit of a pool of water immediately above those falls.

That particular day i was surprised to find a family of ducks standing on the rocks and swimming in the fast moving water. Every now and then one of the ducks would venture into the faster moving currents. Some would be nearly swept over the edge, only to fly away at the last moment. It was interesting to watch and I was surprised that none ever got overtaken by the current. There must have been food in the water because the duck could have moved a few yards up river into calm water.

This particular fellow seemed to be contemplating his next move, standing right next to the fast flowing current. Eventually he made his choice and flew over the current to a calmer section.

Nikon D300
Tamron 700-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm

1/13 sec @ f/14.0, ISO 250

“Cold November at Burleigh Falls”

"Cold November at Burleigh Falls"

During my drive back from Bancroft this past Thursday, I commented to my wife that it looked like and felt like February, rather than April. Spring has been slow to arrive in southern Ontario this year and my thoughts wandered back to November, when I stopped at Burleigh Falls to make a few long exposure photos of the falls there.

At this particular time of year I basically have the place to myself. No tourists taking snapshots, no fishermen trying their best to land the big one, and no kids running madly around the rocks. Long exposure is an apt term for this. It was very cold and blustery and though I love this location, it was experiencing long exposure myself. However, the light was buried and beautiful and made it possible for the image above to be made. I particularly like the colours of the water in contrast with the pink granite in the background and the purplish sky. For me, it captures this moment beautifully, without the bone biting chill.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 @ 38 mm
1/8 sec @ f/25, ISO 200

“Mink on York River II” – York River, near Bancroft, Ontario

Mink on York River

This is the second shot of this little fellow. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I was walking along the York River, planning on  taking some long exposure shots of the rapids when this mink appeared among the rocks. He tried real hard to avoid me seeing him and I found myself dodging and weaving between the rocks to get a clear shot of him. At one point he even went into the rapids and was briefly washed downstream, where he eventually came to shore (that’s why he’s wet). Fortunately for me, my wife, who was also along for the photo shoot, happened to be on the shore and that forced him to come back towards me. After lots of hide-and-seek, he eventually popped his head up long enough for me to get this shot of him, before he disappeared for good.

It is so nice to see wildlife around me and to be able to share those moments and experiences through photography.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/60 sec @ f/3.0, ISO 200

“Wide Turn” – Egan Chute, York River

"Wide Turn" - Egan Chute, York River

Egan Chute is the first of three chutes (Egan, Middle, and Farm) on the York River near Bancoft, Ontario. Egan is the easiest to access and perhaps the most beautiful. At this point of the York River, the river flow bends around a corner and flows with incredible power and beauty across a series of ‘steps’ creating a wonderful fan effect. The wet summer this year has kept the water flowing well, though dry summers create delicate, wispy effects. The chutes are now designated as Ontario Provincial Park to further protect the unique environment.