Tag Archives: return

“The Turning”

“Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving.” 
― Terry Pratchett

Exiting the forest proper, I’m on the edge of a thin poplar stand, the path turns to one side and I’m faced with this tangle of bright sapling and fiery glow from the beeches and maples behind them.

The turning, is part of a cycle, which repeats over and over, yet each time I pass though, I see more and appreciate it even more. In this case, it’s not a turning back, it’s a re-turn, looking forward, with a slightly different set of eyes and experiences than the first time through.

The image also catches another turning, the change in the forest from yellows to golds and orange. Though subtle now, within the next few days I will be bidding a fond farewell to yellow once more and the coppery-orange of the beech trees begins to dominate. The Golden Path is shifting once more as the journey continues and I take another turn towards its conclusion, but based on the number of images I still have to go through, that may still be a while, and I’m good with that.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

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“First Peony of the Season, Revisited”

“First Peony of the Season, Revisited”

“If today is not your day,
then be happy
for this day shall never return.
And if today is your day,
then be happy now
for this day shall never return.”
― Kamand Kojouri

I wanted to revisit this first peony blossom today. The image is made from a slightly different angle. When I shoot in the studio, I almost always set the subject up intuitively and stick with that shot. A few days may pass till I shoot it again, but I rarely, if ever, change the initial composition. Except this time.

I don’t spend a lot of time setting these shots up. I just ‘know’ that a certain composition will work. As I experiment, I may make changes from the original setup, but am usually not happy with it and don’t even make an image.

In the case of this wonderful peony blossom, however, the first shot, which I shared yesterday, was my go-to, yet this view is equally pleasing and shows the full face of the blossom. Nothing else was changed, just the shooting angle. I think both work and am now stuck with which one I like better. Perhaps both?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“First Red Admiral of the Season”

“First Red Admiral of the Season”

“If you feel lost, disappointed, hesitant, or weak, return to yourself, to who you are, here and now and when you get there, you will discover yourself, like a lotus flower in full bloom, even in a muddy pond, beautiful and strong.”
― Masaru Emoto

This week seems to be a day of firsts. Earlier, I posted an image of the first Bloodroot blossom of the year. This image, of a Red Admiral butterfly was made a few yards away from the flower photo.

This is what I love about spring, it’s a time of firsts, or rather, a time of returns. The return of those familiar things associated with each season, the things that mark that season and location as unique in our recall.

What makes this photo special to me is not just the beauty of the butterfly, but the small signs of green around last year’s dead leaves. A sign to me, that life is returning, as it always has, to the forests around me. And with that, new wonders, new plants, and new images to make and share.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/7.1 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Yellow Returns”

“Yellow Returns”

She wore her yellow sun-bonnet,
She wore her greenest gown;
She turned to the south wind
And curtsied up and down.
She turned to the sunlight
And shook her yellow head,
And whispered to her neighbor:
“Winter is dead.”
― A.A. Milne

Early December of 2016 I bid a fond adieu to yellow, the colour yellow. It seemed at that point in time, the colour yellow was completely absent in my natural surroundings.

Alas! It’s now spring 2017 and yellow is returning to the world once more, after a long absence, and I welcome it back with open arms.

I spotted this lily at the store a few days back and had to bring it home. Though not the traditional white easter lily, this one will bring a splash of colour, and provide me with many days of photographic enjoyment as I watch, and document, its blossoms open. At the rate it’s going, it should be at its peak in a few more days, as yellow returns, once more.

Of course, with warming temperatures, yellow will return once more to my lawn, in the form of dandelions, but that’s OK too.

Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.6sec, f/36.0, ISO 200

High Resolution Image on 500px

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“Glowing Beech Leaves”

“Glowing Beech Leaves” Durham Forest, Uxbridge

Did I mention I love the light in the fall?

During one of my hikes this fall, I was covered with a glowing canopy of golden beech leaves, brightly lit by the sun. All the light around me was this beautiful, warm yellow/orange and the entire forest just glowed.

Amid all this warmth, it was difficult to isolate a single image that showed the source of this wonderful light. This image is probably the best representation of what I saw. Multiply this image by thousands and that would give a good idea of just how glorious the light was. The leaves literally looked like they were made of gold. Granted, some had some decay and did not look their best, but that was not noticeable till you got up close.

This particular cluster showed its finery the best, with nice structure and clean lines, against the darker  pine forest in the background.

Whenever I look at this photo, it brings me back to the place and time when I made it and fills me with a warmth and longing to return, knowing it was just one of those fleeting moments that we can only return to in memory, but I’ll hold onto it, nonetheless and look forward to the next season with hopes that nature repeats her show once more.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 165mm
1/250 sec @ f/9.0 -.33, ISO 250

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