Tag Archives: river

Iceland – Day 7

 

“Hraunfossar - Wide View” - Western Iceland“Hraunfossar – Wide View” – Western Iceland

“In Iceland, water is everywhere. It surrounds the land itself. Water courses from high mountaintops, bursts from the ground, itself, and flows in endless ribbons over the ancient stone, cleansing the blackened and tortured landscape. The water rarely stands still, as if it’s the lifeblood of the land itself.”
– Ed Lehming

Today, as we headed toward the town of Borgarnes, on Iceland’s western coast, we pulled out a map and plotted a route that took us from the coast, inland to the high mountains, lava fields, and glaciers of south-eastern Iceland.

Along this route we picked a few points of interest, including Hraunfossar, a low and wide waterfall along the Hvítá river. The fall is unusual in that they burst forth from underground along the Hallmundarhraun, which is a massive lava plain that dominates this region. It’s strange to see this amount of water coming from the side of a hill, just below the vegetation. In fact, you hardly notice it at first.

I spent quite some time here, enjoying the scene before me and making many long exposure images of different parts of the waterfall.

Just above Hraunfossar is Barnafoss, a violent cascade created by the massive volumes of  water from the glacial Hvítá river. Barnafoss, which translates into “the children’s waterfall” is named after a local tale that on a Christmas Eve many years ago two children in the Hraunsás household who were supposed to stay home while the parents went to church for Christmas Mass. When the parents returned from mass, they discovered that the children had disappeared (possibly because the children got bored and decided to go out). They then followed the children’s tracks to this waterfall at the stone natural bridge where the tracks disappeared. The mother concluded that the children must have fallen into the river and drowned. Thus, the name.

From here we traveled yet further inland, having mapped a course back to Borgarnes along a highway that looked like many of the unpaved roads we have travelled on this trip, only out find it had been re-designated as an “F” road, one of Iceland’s inland mountain roads, thus our rental car was forbidden to travel it.

Rather than simply turn back, we re-navigated to another gravel road that followed a less mountainous path along the opposite shore of the Hvítá river. In doing this loop, we did cross the Hvítá on a high plain and looked upstream to the glaciers that birthed it, making the detour interesting.

And so, we headed towards tonight’s destination: Borgarnes, a coastal town along the western cost to plan out our final few adventures in this astoundingly beautiful country.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/.0 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Light and Motion”

Light & Motion on Merced River (Happy Isles Area)

“Oh, these vast, calm, measureless mountain days, inciting at once to work and rest! Days in whose light everything seems equally divine, opening a thousand windows to show us God. Nevermore, however weary, should one faint by the way who gains the blessings of one mountain day; whatever his fate, long life, short life, stormy or calm, he is rich forever.” 
― John Muir

I simply had to quote John Muir for this image that I made several years ago, as I began to experiment with long exposures to communicate the ‘feel’ of a place. The image itself is of the Merced River in California’s Yosemite national Park. It’s become a sacred place for me, one I have made several pilgrimages back to over the years.

This is a simple composition, made at the “Happy Isles” portion of the river, as its icy waters flood over centuries old river rock. There is colour and life; light and motion here. It’s a place I could sit for hours, simply enjoying the freshness and listen to the waters rush over the stones.

The photograph, has sat on my computer, perhaps waiting till I was ready to present it. I believe it’s time, so I have printed it as a 48″ canvas print for my upcoming Studio Tour.

Nikon D300
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

“York River Reflections”

“York River Reflections”

“Abstraction allows man to see with his mind what he cannot see physically with his eyes….Abstract art enables the artist to perceive beyond the tangible, to extract the infinite out of the finite. It is the emancipation of the mind. It is an exploration into unknown areas.”
― Arshile Gorky

This is where is started, my fascination with photo abstractions. Back in March 0f 2012, I was hiking the shores of the York River, near Bancroft, Ontario when I noticed a beautiful reflection on the slightly rippled river surface. I made a few images and was pleased with the outcome. Then, I did something different: I cropped hem to remove the shoreline and flipped the image upside down, producing this beautiful ‘painterly’ abstract of the trees on the far shore. The slight flash of orange near the centre of the photo was an interesting and unexpected bonus.

A close friend of mine commented that it looked like a painting and I ran with that, making my first 24 x 36 canvas print, and yes, it did look like a painting then. It sold quickly and I’m considering reprinting it, larger, for my office wall, since it really has been a pivotal piece for me.

I’m thinking this may serve as the model for my next attempt at painting. Stay tuned.

Nikon D200
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 50mm
1/100 sec, f/4.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Tuesdays of Texture – “Beneath the Fall”

“Beneath the Fall”

This is what froth below a local waterfall looks like when it freezes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/40 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Falls at “The Gut” – Apsley, Ontario

Falls at “The Gut” - Apsley, Ontario

“There is a hidden message in every waterfall. It says, if you are flexible, falling will not hurt you!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

As many of you who follow my blog might know, I love moving water and waterfalls. A few years ago, I set out to discover and document the many waterfalls and cascades in the area where I camp.

My journeys have taken me down some long, little travelled trails, across private property (which took some negotiating), and right next to major roadways. Hours have been spent enjoying the flow of water, relaxing on the shore after some strenuous hikes, and just taking in the raw beauty which is Ontario’s backcountry.

About a year ago, I shared this documentary journey with a friend of mine who also likes waterfalls and he asked me if I had visited “The Gut” yet. That surprised me. I had never heard of “The Gut”. He suggested I look it up and pay a visit.

Yesterday, I did just that. I Googled it and found out a bit more about it. The name intrigued me, as well as photos others had posted. So, on my way home from my camper I set out to find this place, relying on roadside signage to guide me.

I came across a sign on the highway that pointed to “The Gut” and it indicated that my destination was 14 km away. This turned out to be 14 km of hilly, winding, dirt road, with no further signs to indicate my progress. Finally, at the top of a particularly steep hill, another sign indicated that I had arrived.

After parking the car my wife and I proceeded down a trail marked “The Gut Falls”.It was a short, steep hike but we found our final destination, a heavy fence installed to keep distracted hikers from falling into the Gut, a fissure in the local basalt lava rock, some 30 meters high and between 5 to 10 meters across. The Crowe Rivers flows through this steep walled feature, beginning with the waterfall pictured above. I have several other photos which I will post over the next few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“York River Backcountry”

York River Backcountry

“I thought how lovely and how strange a river is. A river is a river, always there, and yet the water flowing through it is never the same water and is never still. It’s always changing and is always on the move. And over time the river itself changes too. It widens and deepens as it rubs and scours, gnaws and kneads, eats and bores its way through the land.”
― Aidan Chambers

The York River, in Central Ontario runs from Baptiste Lake, meanders through the region and changing its aspect several times along its course. It is inaccessible, other than by canoe through much of its journey.

I’ve hiked to many of the chutes and paddled several sections of this beautiful river. Yesterday, I went for a back-country drive, looking for a diversion from wildflowers, though I found many of them too.

During this drive I came across a road named Iron  Bridge Road. The name got my attention and I proceeded to see where this “Iron Bridge” was, hoping I was not committing to a long drive, only to find that there used to be an iron bridge.

The bridge itself was not far down the road and I was pleasantly surprised to discover that it cross the York River and offered a nice view of the river as it wound its way through the back-country as a gentle flow, with lily pads and arrowroot growing along the shores. From my maps, it would appear it continues this way for several miles, before entering into a series of rapids and chutes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Underside” – Queenston-Lewiston Bridge

“Underside” - Queenston-Lewiston Bridge

“Seeing all life in perfect symmetry.
Perceiving each day with righteous clarity.
Living each moment in purposed reality.
Believing each day is the start of eternity.”
― S. Tarr

A unique way of looking at this heavily travelled bridge between Canada and the USA at Niagara Falls.

I’ve driven across this bridge many times and sat, lined up, for what felt like an eternity, at the border checkpoint both going to the US and returning home to Canada. With all the security on the surface of the bridge I was surprised at the complete lack, or apparent lack thereof, below the bridge. In fact, there is a beautiful walking/cycling path that I made this photo from, which allows you to see not only the details of the bridge supports but also the details and pathways on the far shore, which I had never noticed before.

Nikon D300
Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 @ 48 mm
1/125 sec, f/8.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com