Tag Archives: Rock

“Resolve”

“A rock may seem a sound foundation but deep, nourished, and interwoven roots will hold surprisingly fast over time”
– Ed Lehming

This tree growing around a large boulder at the top of a hill got me really thinking, as I made this image a few weeks ago. It seems that the boulder would be a challenging place to grow. In fact, as I considered this image, I tried to think of the process that would create this oddity. Did the tree start growing here and the frost gradually pushed the boulder up? Or did the tree start growing in a small patch of soil on top of the boulder?

It also got me thinking of the notion of the rock being a solid and somewhat permanent object to use as an anchor, yet the rock is not connected to anything and that diminishes its ability to support the tree. I imagine a strong wind or more heaving from frost will loosen this perch over a few years, yet there is a conflict here. The roots, wrapped around the rock fasten it in place, preventing movement.

The real strength here is in the deep roots, spreading and anchoring the tree and rock. Based on the size and age of the tree, this seems to be working but it’s very strange and unique.

How often do we embark on projects, firm in our resolve that things are solid when, in our limited perspective, we are anchored on less than we think?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 175 mm
1/50 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Egan Strata 2”

“Egan Strata 2”

“Everything dreams. The play of form, of being, is the dreaming of substance. Rocks have their dreams, and the earth changes….” 
― Ursula K. Le Guin

Image two of this series of photos of the wonderful rock formations at Egan Chute. I found it interesting, despite my education in geology, that the form and flow of the rock really resonated with me, not for the first time, but very strongly. Enough to make this series of images.

I find myself enjoying these images and really appreciating the detail, the small clumps of moss, fallen leaves, and the layering of the rock itself. All things I observed when making the image, but diluted by the vastness of the stone itself and the constant roar of rushing water at my side. The little triangular pool of water is the focus of the image, so temporary within the seeming permanence of the rock, yet it’s the water which wears the rock down, trapped with no escape, except through evaporation in the hot summer sun.

iPhone 7 back camera @ 4.0mm
1/250 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Urgency”

“Urgency”

“Water is the most perfect traveller because when it travels it becomes the path itself!” 
― Mehmet Murat ildan

This image is another of High Falls, near Bancroft, Ontario. I really could spend a day photographing various parts of the waterfall, as light shifts and different elements of the flowing water reveal themselves.

The ancient rock structures in this area add so much character to the waterfalls through their deep textures and colours. These are ancient Canadian Shield structures, known for their age and diverse mineral content. I provide more information on the falls themselves on a previous post.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/13 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
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Monochrome Mondays

“The Arch” - Cabo San Lucas

“Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.”
― Gustave Flaubert

“The Arch” – Cabo San Lucas

Above is another image of the “Arch” at Cabo San Lucas. What I feel makes this image unique is that there is not a single tourist boat in front of it. The photo was made early one morning as we were heading out for a day of diving, too early for most of the tourists. There were still a few boats milling about in the waters near teh Arch, but I was able to time the shot to keep them out of the frame.

Again, the wonder of photography allows me to look back on  this moment and see the fine details that I missed, or rather ignored, when I made the photo. For example, the water in the foreground is already starting to show a slight ‘chop’. My memory of that time was that the water was smooth and the day windless. I also did not notice just how fragile this massive structure is. Looking at it now, it looks like it could fall apart at any moment, even though it has weathered eons of pounding surf and hurricanes.

Producing it as a mono image just makes all those fine features jump out a bit more and highlights the range of tones in this iconic symbol of Cabo. Somebody told me that going to Cabo without seeing the Arch was like going to Paris and not seeing the Eiffel Tower.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Unburdened”

“Unburdened”

“These rocks are too heavy, can’t carry them any more,
don’t know why I ever picked them up before,
going to have to put them down where they don’t belong,
’cause I can’t get them back to where they came from.

These rocks belong to no one, except history.
Somewhere between the desert and the rolling sea,
or maybe up in the mountains blue and tall,
I picked them but now I’m going to let them fall.”
― Jay Woodman

This is one of those images that just created all sorts of thoughts for me. It’s not a typical shot for me, but the arrangement fascinated me at the time.

Along the shore of the Crowe River, near Apsley, Ontario, the river, which is really a large creek, dropped off its spring cargo of boulders. The river starts out at Paudash Lake, some 15 miles north. However, the Crowe is mainly a ‘meander’, meaning it snakes its way slowly through the surrounding countryside. So, how far from the source this point, just above “The Gut” is would be a guess.

What struck me is the size of these boulders (the small one in the centre is about bowling ball sized) and how a generally lazy river could move these. That got me wondering further on where they came from and how far they had travelled. At some point in the spring there must have been a substantial current and these boulders have had quite a journey to round and smooth them as much as they have been. Yet, at some point in the spring runoff, the force of water was no longer sufficient to move them any further and he river unburdened itself, till the cycle repeats next spring.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 180 mm
1/60sec, f/2.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Wear and Tear”

“Wear and Tear”

“We are often unaware of the gradual decline and the erosion in our lives but not unaware of the gnawing feeling it brings.”
― Eric Samuel Timm

As I stood on the shore, I could not help but notice the features of this rock outcropping. Wave after wave flowed over it and the light revealed deep scrapes and abrasions. Small rocks washed and danced over the surface and around the edges. The surf repeated this pattern, over and over. At some point, driven by the extreme tides of the Bay of Fundy, larger boulders must have passed over the surface, creating the deep gouges and chips. Long before I was born and long after I’m gone, this pattern continues, adding to the abrasive material that’s responsible. Eventually, the rock will be worn down by some it’s own material.

How often does life wear us down to the point where we are the very agents of our continued erosion?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 95 mm
1/8 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Stuck” – Duffins Creek near Whitevale

“Stuck” - Duffins Creek near Whitevale

Elegant in it’s simplicity?

Apparently, someone had been throwing rocks onto the ice, hoping for a breakthrough? I returned a few days later to find dozens of rocks littering the ice surface. It turns out that the frost pushed them from an adjacent cliff and the rolled across the ice, coming to rest some distance from their source. Things are not always as they seem. Perhaps this situation is a combination of both potential reasons?

I came across several of these larger rocks frozen to the surface of Duffins Creek a few days ago. The simplicity of the rock isolated on the ice made for a nice composition and the light that day was wonderful. You can see all the detail in the rock and a bit of blue sky reflected in the ice. If you look carefully, you can see some of the riverbed through the somewhat milky ice as well.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com