Tag Archives: San Jose del Cabo

“Sierra de la Laguna and Estuary” – San Jose del Cabo

“Sierra de la Laguna and Estuary” - San Jose del Cabo

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity” 
― John Muir

I realized, as I was posting this image, that the same scene is the background for a previous post. But, that’s how I create many of my compositions. Several images from the same vantage point, as I take in my surroundings and observe the various elements that make up the broader scene.

What resonates with me in this image is the stark contrasts between the lush vegetation of the estuary in the foreground and the stark mountains of the Sierra de la Laguna in the background. By the way, all the green you see on the slopes of the mountain are various varieties of cactus and other brittle and spiky desert plants.

This image was made close to mid-day and a fine veil of mist hangs above lush palms like a halo, creating a slight haze across the lower mountains.

The Sierra create what I often term a ‘spine’ down the centre of the Baja Peninsula. Though rugged and mostly arid, I have noticed a few places which are green and inviting. These places will need to be explored on future visits to this region which beckons my back.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/400 sec, f/10.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Travel Oddities”

“Travel Oddities”

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” 
― Marcel Proust

It’s pretty amazing the things we see when travelling. I’m not talking about the tourist traps or grand vistas, for me, it’s about the mundane and pondering what something is and how it got to be there.

On a recent trip to Baja, I came across several stacks of wood along the beach. They were out-of-place and were not there last year. In fact, this stretch of beach has a significant absence of driftwood. Last year this wide swath of beach separated the San Jose  del Cabo estuary for the Sea of Cortez. The estuary, is the outflow of fresh water that has accumulated via sand streams (a slow percolation of groundwater from inland) and is separated from the ocean by a strip of land. In this case, a beach, about 50 meters wide.

The estuary is rich with plant and bird life as opposed to the rest of this mountainous, desert peninsula, dominated by rock sand and cactus

I wondered who had stacked these pieces of wood in this fashion and automatically assumed it was the surf fishermen or surfers who frequent this strip of beach. The who remains unknown but how the wood got here became clear on talking to people who were in the area after hurricane Lydia came through the area last fall.

The heavy winds and rainfall overwhelmed the estuary causing the whole structure to shift several hundred meters east. The wood came for trees uprooted in the estuary and deposited in the ocean, which eventually pushed the wood ashore. Apparently, it was quite unpleasant after the storm as not only trees and garbage, but also wildlife and people squatting within the estuary lands were also washed out to sea.

So, this simple odd composition has a story to tell, if you but ask.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 116mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors | June 29, 2017

“Zaragoza 20 - San Jose del Cabo”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Zaragoza 20 – San Jose del Cabo”

These weather worn doors are the entrance to La Panga Antigua, a restaurant in the Art District of San Jose del Cabo in Baja California, Mexico. See here for what lies behind these ‘rustic’ doors. You’ll be surprised. I was and now will have to return to sample the interior. I’m also including a Streetview link so you have some context of the neighbourhood.

When I made the image I was simply intrigued by the chunk of wood suspended above the door. It just seemed odd and out of place. Now, as I look up the address and the name of the establishment, it all makes sense, sort of. A Panga, modern derivation traditional dugout fishing boat. Generally, if you say panga, it’s simply interpreted as ‘boat’.

Now it makes sense, La Panga Antigua means “the old boat” and the chunk of wood is actually a piece of an old wooden dugout. Anyways, that mystery is now solved and I can reflect back on the numerous interesting and unique doors in this area of San Jose del Cabo, the Art District. Each vendor trying to differentiate themselves from others, often through the use of doors.

Nikon D800
AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF- @ 112mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6 ISO 200

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – April 27, 2017

“Gloria’s - San Jose del Cabo”

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Gloria’s – San Jose del Cabo”

I thought it would be a good day to revisit one of my Mexico photos today. You see, I had the full intention to build a large collection of Mexican doors from this trip. What I learned was, never try to do it before 9:00am, as they are all locked up.

In this case, and in many others, not just the doors are locked with wrought iron gates, but so are the windows. This practice seemed to be quite common in San Jose del Cabo, a moderate sized town at the south end of Mexico’s Baja peninsula. The concept of locked doors has also been replaced by a preference for chains and padlocks, which was evident even on the modern doors of some of teh local banks.

Sadly, I was not able to return on this visit to get a shot of the door by itself, it looks like a beauty, so will have to plan a return trip 🙂

iPhone 5S back camera @ 4.2mm
1/2000 sec;   f/2.2;  ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Surf Fishing” – San Jose del Cabo

"Surf Fishing" - San Jose del Cabo“In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is the story of the earth.”
― Rachel Carson

My first real memory from my recent trip to Baja was hearing the Sea of Cortez surf pounding on the beach at San Jose del Cabo. I don’t mean surf ‘rolling’, I mean the surf here literally explodes as sea meets sand, on the steeply inclined shore, which causes the water to quickly recede, leading to strong undertow and rip-tides. It’s not safe for swimming, at least in this section of the beach.

While this image was made seconds after a large wave broke, and the surface seems relatively calm, you can see the explosive spray of waves as they break further along the beach, an area frequented by surf fishermen. I wondered why the surf was so much more intense in this area. While looking at satellite imagery, I noticed that the seabed is a bit shallower at this point, making for higher surf. It also makes it an ideal place for smaller bait fish to collect, attracting the larger sports fish, such as Dorado,  Jack Crevalle, Sierra, California Yellowtail, and Wahoo. And that, attracts the surf fishermen, which you can see on the sandy point.

The view here just resonated with me, as I looked across the bay to the distant hillside, the morning sun warmed my face, the sound of surf echoed in my ears, and the tang of the salty air, filled me with joy. It brings a smile to my face and a sense of calm, just recalling the moment.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Thursday Doors – March 09, 2017

“Red Door” - Art District, San Jose del Cabo

This week’s submission to Norm 2.0‘s Thursday Doors.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favourite door photos from around the world.

“Red Door” – Art District, San Jose del Cabo

It would appear that I’m experiencing two distinct themes this month: One being the Humpback Whale series I have posted over the past few days, the other is the fascinating doors, so different from the Central Ontario doors I see every day. Most of the doors I will be sharing where in the Art District of San Jose del Cabo, a small town about 20 kilometers from the popular tourist area of Cabo San Lucas.

Where Cabo San Lucas is a busy tourist town with a significant party scene, San Jose is a lot quieter with a bit of a mission town feel, despite the numerous souvenir shops. They also have a very deliberate focus on the arts, with an art district just off the town square. Each shop has its own unique look and feel and it’s marvelously bohemian.

The red door above is testament to the ever-changing look of the evolving art district. As I retraced my steps through the street with Google Streetview I discovered that this door has changed form from its previous persona, check out the Streetview link above and you’ll see that the door was previously bare wood. I actually prefer the red version. And who knows, next time I visit, it may be blue.

I find it funny, that I can talk about a simple door at length, I’m sure most of you understand. There’s just so much going on in the image that we tend to miss when actually there and we wonder how we could possibly not have noticed. That is one of the many joys of photography.

The experience has also made me keenly aware of the variability of light between Ontario and the subtropics of the Baja Peninsula, making for interesting shadows.

iPhone 5s back camera @ 4.2mm
1/4000 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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Wordless Wednesday

“After the Rains” - San Jose del Cabo, Mexico

“After the Rains” – San Jose del Cabo, Mexico

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 112 mm
1/100 sec, f/4.8, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com