Tag Archives: seasons

“Boundaries”


“Like most boundaries, they have two aspects. What is inside it and what is outside, it all depends upon which side you are on”
– Ed Lehming

I’m still in retrospect mode, moving through photos I made last year, considering the thinking behind their creation and the feelings I was experiencing when I made them.

Much of this is influenced by the world around me, though I try my utmost to detach from the negatives constantly bombarding us these days. One of the themes that was inescapable is the concept of boundaries, both physical and conceptual. A boundary is a point of separation, some boundaries have a transition zone and others are abrupt, often driven by the intent of the boundary.

In the case of this photo, the boundary between winter and autumn is quite abrupt, which is what made me stop to consider what I was seeing. The entire autumn in my area has been highly changeable, transitioning from snow, to rain, to sunshine, with snow never remaining on the ground for more than a few days. This also meant that any snowfall was temporary, at best. Here, the shade of the pine trees shelters a section of snow, creating a very defined boundary.

As I made the image, the thought about the nature of boundaries began to form. After all, if I stand on the boundary and look one way, I’m greeted with a snow filled and wintry view. Yet, if I remain in the same spot and turn around, it’s a late autumn day. If I did not have the benefit of seeing the whole picture, I could assume it is one season, when it is not. So, the boundary is, like I noted in my quote, really dependent on which side you are on and which way you are looking. It’s a concept I would like to continue to build on over the next few months.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 92 mm
1/4 sec, f/16.0 ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

Monochrome Mondays

“Final Traces”

“Painful experiences are like scars in our minds. Some have healed and been forgotten. Others are there as a reminder of what we have been through…”
― James A. Murphy,

“Final Traces”

As winter gives way to spring ‘final traces’ can be seen, reminding us of the winter that was. Not always fond reminders, but reminders, of what was, and is no more. We can chose to reflect on them, deliberately, curiously, or just leave the experience behind us, anticipating warmer days.

Pictured above is a branch sticking out of the water on the shores of Lake Ontario, with a big clump of ice still sticking to it, evidencing colder and stormy times, not so long ago.

I made the image because I envisioned it as a mono photo, the dark wood in contrast to the white of the ice. The water was multiple tones of blue and green, which translated nicely to mid-tones in the final image. There was also that element of isolation, the branch, sticking out of the water with nothing else near it. It seemed a bit unsettling, almost as if it’s reaching for the surface, trying to escape from the depths it’s currently locked into.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 116 mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Cold Water Visitor”

“Cold Water Visitor”

“I am so grateful to be here on this awesome planet with its diverse life – everything we need to not just survive but to thrive. I am excited to continually learn more about it, and always curious to see what is going to come up next.”
― Jay Woodman

While photographing the Lake Ontario shore line recently, one of the thousands of Canada Geese floating offshore decided to give me a closer look. Most of the geese tend to be fairly tame, being in close proximity with humans in this area.

People and geese tend to occupy the same spaces, along the shore, in parks, and open fields. It becomes a bit of a problem when the geese get dependant on humans, who provide them food and the opportunity for food. In some parks, the geese don’t even migrate south anymore, since they have all they need. That becomes an even bigger problem when the temperatures drop, which has been fairly infrequent her in the past few years. But, deep drops in temperature can freeze even large bodies of water like Lake Ontario. We’ve had some mild winters, but extended cold spells are a game changer, sometimes leaving the geese without the open water they need.

In any case, this one wanted to get a closer look at me. I tend not to photograph the Canada Geese much, primarily because they are so commonplace around here. This one made me look again. As it emerged from the frigid waters, small drops of water glistened on its breast feathers, like small jewels in the late afternoon sun, and it posed so nicely for me, I simply could not resist the opportunity.

There’s also the small pile of melting snow to the left, a reminder that winter is not quite finished with us here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Morning’s Sunny Kiss”

“Morning’s Sunny Kiss”

“Morning is an important time of day, because how you spend your morning can often tell you what kind of day you are going to have.”
― Lemony Snicket

Dawn broke forth bright and very cool this past weekend. That’s the nature of September around here. Glorious, warm days spent basking in the last few weeks of summer, hoping for a mild and extended fall.

It’s been a hot and dry summer here in southern Ontario, a bit too dry for plants, which are showing signs of heat stress. But, I hate to say goodbye to such a wonderful summer, spent hiking, canoeing, and gardening. Yet, the gradual change of seasons brings pleasant surprises, like the soft sunshine, creating tiny jewels in the tamarack branches, greeting me as I rounded a corner during my morning walk, bringing a smile to my face.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring’s First Daffodils” – Niagara-on-the Lake

“Spring’s First Daffodils”  -Niagara-on-the-Lake

“I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills
When all at once I saw a crowd
A host of golden daffodils
Beside the lake beneath the trees
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”
― William Wordsworth

At long last, I feel I might be able to say that spring and warmer weather are here to stay? I’ve posted about ‘false starts‘ and the change of seasons, the endless repeating cycles, yet consistent warm days elude me. This image was made nearly two weeks ago, a mere 50 kilometers south of my home, yet my own daffodils are reluctant to bloom.

Daffodils, like peonies, are one of those marvelous plants that keep spreading every year. I often see large patches and imagine them being planted many years ago and just spreading out, covering larger areas over time.

Judging the forecast and their current state, I’d say they will open in the next day and it ‘should’ be warmer every day next week. Here’s hoping.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 98 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring’s First Bloodroot” – Seaton Trail

“Spring’s First Bloodroot” - Seaton Trail

“Come with me into the woods where spring is
advancing, as it does, no matter what,
not being singular or particular, but one
of the forever gifts, and certainly visible.”
― Mary Oliver

The inevitable cycle of spring continues with its succession of flowering plants. First to bloom is the Coltsfoot, the next, which just started to bloom yesterday, predictably, about a week after the Coltsfoot, is the Bloodroot – Sanguinaria canadensis.

I love this early blooming spring flower, with its bright white blossoms, emerging from a green ‘shawl’ of leaves. They are interesting in how they bloom, with the blossom forming before the leaves have opened up, much like the Coltsfoot. Which has me wondering if this is some sort of protection in case of a late frost? In any case, I welcome these early harbingers of spring and look forward to the next blossoms, that of the Dog-Tooth Violet or Trout Lily, soon to follow.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com