Tag Archives: Seaton Trail

“Pearl Crescent” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Pearl Crescent ( Phyciodes tharos )”  - Whitevale, Ontario

“Butterflies are self propelled flowers.”
― Robert A. Heinlein

Butterflies are summer to me and I just love the Robert Heinlein quote above. As the air warms, I see more and more of them darting around on the air. They seem to come in all sizes and colours and tend to be a bit elusive when it comes time to photograph them. They sit wonderfully still, till it’s time to release the shutter.

I’m also discovering just how many varieties of butterflies and moths are native to my area of the world. I enjoy identifying the plants and animals I come across on my wanderings and am being more deliberate in the habit lately, as I see other bloggers whom I follow doing the same thing.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm

1/80 sec, f/5.6 ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

“June Daisies” – Whitevale, Ontario

"June Daisies" - Whitevale, Ontario

“Daisies, simple and sweet. Daisies are the way to win my heart.”
― Patrick Rothfuss

As the quote above says, “Daisies, simple and sweet”. Daisies abound at this time of year. They seem as commonplace as dandelions, yet there is a beautiful simplicity to them that sets them apart from their meadow companions. Perhaps hearkening back to childhood, when I would pick bunches for my grandmother on my way home from school. They lent themselves to that kind of activity, never wilting or seeming to care about their rough transport in the hands of a child.

Or, perhaps it’s the purity of the white petals and the sun-like centres. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t believe I’ll ever tire of daisies. For me they symbolize purity, innocence, and the promise of warm summer days spent wandering through nature, drinking her sights and sounds. Just the thought of it brings a smile to my face.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm

1/160 sec, f/5.6 ISO 220

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Emerald Jewelwing” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Emerald Jewelwing” - Whitevale

“Despite its dark veins, the transparency of dragonfly’s wings assures me of a pure, innocent world”
― Munia Khan

Ah, warm weather walks. As plants grow taller and spread across the forest floors, their insect companions abound and show in ever increasing displays of colour and variety. Some are tougher to photograph than others. This female emerald jewelwing, with her distinctive black body and white wing spots, is fairly common around here, but they tend to be a bit skittish with movement. This time she cooperated and posed nicely on a lime green leaf, making her stand out even more.

I have not seen many males yet. They are metallic green in colour and I’m sure they will show up shortly too.

As more wildlife begins to show itself, I’m finding myself gravitating towards it and away from plants. I hope those following my blog aren’t too disappointed?

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @300mm

1/160sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pain in the Butt” – Seaton Trail

“Pain in the Butt” - Seaton Trail

“Such is the condition of organic nature! Whose first law might be expressed in the words ‘Eat or be eaten!’ and which would seem to be one great slaughter-house, one universal scene of rapacity and injustice!”
― Erasmus Darwin

Ever have one of those days where, out of nowhere, something just sneaks up and gets you from behind? You can take small comfort that you are not this Wood Frog. I’d say our troubles are tame compared to his.

I came across this scene a few days ago while on a short hike along Ontario’s Seaton Trail. I heard a rustle of leaves and spotted motion just off the trail. At first all I saw was the large Garter Snake, then I noticed it had caught the frog. The light was awesome, so I sat to watch this process play out and document it with my camera. I’ve seen photos in elementary school textbooks of how snakes eat their prey, but have never witnessed it firsthand. It’s quite the process

How the snake would get this large frog into it’s mouth was beyond me, especially considering the frog’s legs were still free and active, and he had filled himself up with air. Well, after a few mis-timed kicks, the frog’s legs were in the snake’s gullet and the rest was just a matter of time. Twenty minutes, to be precise, from when this image was made to the time the last trace of the frog disappeared. You just never know what you might see when out on the trails.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.6 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring’s First Bloodroot” – Seaton Trail

“Spring’s First Bloodroot” - Seaton Trail

“Come with me into the woods where spring is
advancing, as it does, no matter what,
not being singular or particular, but one
of the forever gifts, and certainly visible.”
― Mary Oliver

The inevitable cycle of spring continues with its succession of flowering plants. First to bloom is the Coltsfoot, the next, which just started to bloom yesterday, predictably, about a week after the Coltsfoot, is the Bloodroot – Sanguinaria canadensis.

I love this early blooming spring flower, with its bright white blossoms, emerging from a green ‘shawl’ of leaves. They are interesting in how they bloom, with the blossom forming before the leaves have opened up, much like the Coltsfoot. Which has me wondering if this is some sort of protection in case of a late frost? In any case, I welcome these early harbingers of spring and look forward to the next blossoms, that of the Dog-Tooth Violet or Trout Lily, soon to follow.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Study in Wood #6” – Seaton Trail, Whitvale

“Study in Wood #6”

“The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see nature all ridicule and deformity… and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”
― William Blake

I absolutely love the William Blake quote above. It goes beyond simply this image.

Number 6 in the series and growing. I keep coming across these gnarly old specimens, standing along the trails, or in city parks. I find myself staring at them, immersed in their story, while others pass them by as merely ‘stumps’. They all remind me of abstract paintings or deeply furrowed sculptures. Their lives recorded; marked out in intricate patterns, each unique.This particular tree had been recently stripped of its bark, revealing smooth undulating wood, with only tinges of moss taking hold.

Winter winds had embedded a few stray cedar and spruce needles in a hollow. I was not sure if I wanted to include them in this composition, but they are part of the image in front of me, so I decided to leave them in.

The smooth surface of this tree is so different from most trees I see. It reveals all the curves and bumps of a slow growing hardwood. Though the bark is gone, I expect it’s a member of the maple family. tree aficionados, feel free to help me on this one. By the end of summer, I expect this old fellow will be darkened with moss, it’s surface transforming from a solid, almost ivory-like texture to one mottled with mildew and softening as the decay process takes hold. Yet, here he is preserved as a photo for me to enjoy even when he’s gone back to the ground that birthed him, so many years ago.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 82 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Trailside Brook” – Seaton Trail, near Whitevale

“Trailside Brook” - Seaton Trail, near Whitevale

“Peace is not found by seeking it but in simply letting it be.”
― Janni Styles

I’ve enjoyed this small brook that flows from a farm field into Duffins Creek below Whitevale. The sound of the water flowing over the rocks is so calming. I could sit there all day and simply enjoy the peace.

I made this photo just before a light, early April snowfall started (not impressed by that feature). The mid afternoon light was dull and diffused, which made for an easy 1/8 second time exposure, to put the water into motion. It had frozen the night before, creating the few icicles visible to the mid-right. The photo captures a bit of the calm I enjoyed and I’m hoping to pass it on to others.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 80 mm
1/10 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com