Tag Archives: Secord Pond

“Algae Art” – Secord Pond, Uxbridge

“Algea Art” - Secord Pond, Uxbridge

“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.”
― Aristotle

Art is everywhere. Sometimes, in the most surprising places, and with unexpected elements. Case in point, this algal bloom on a local pond. It looks a bit like a satellite image of some tropical forest and smells just like a horse stable. In fact, I was wondering if the local trail riding association was having a meeting close by.

In any case, these wonderful layered patterns in various shades of glowing greens and dull brown were a sight to see and it would have been interesting to watch them form.The bloom was likely caused by the sudden heat up we had this past weekend and the waves and layers caused by winds blowing  from the east and forcing the progressive layers of the bloom into one end of the pond. It’s also quite thick but I had no desire to touch it to check consistency.

And that, is why I enjoy nature so much; there is always something new to see and discover that is beyond the imagination.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Advertisements

“Cracked Ice” – Secord Pond

“Cracked Ice” - Secord Pond

If you should go skating
On the thin ice of modern life
Dragging behind you the silent reproach
Of a million tear stained eyes
Don’t be surprised, when a crack in the ice
Appears under your feet
You slip out of your depth and out of your mind
With your fear flowing out behind you
As you claw the thin ice – Pink Floyd

This image is the second in a series of photographs I made a few weeks ago, observing the gradual melting of the ice on a local pond. The patterns and various structures interested me and I wanted to spend more time looking them over, from the comfort of my office.

Above is a small section of the pond, close to shore. The snow has melted, leaving just the ice below exposed to the sun. The surface is uneven, caused by the melting and refreezing of snow to different depths. The white ‘cracks’ are the result of the ice cracking open and snow filling the cracks, only to refreeze. As I noted in other recent posts, the snow this year was particularly pure and white, which only enhances this effect.

Over my many years of hiking the same trails, I’m still seeing new things every time and I take that as a gift.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 125 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Across the Ice” – Secord Pond

“Across the Ice” - Secord Pond

“One of the reasons there are so many terms for conditions of ice is that the mariners observing it were often trapped in it, and had nothing to do except look at it.”
― Alec Wilkinson

As winter transitioned into spring and the light coating of snow melted on the lakes, rivers and ponds in the area, some very interesting effects emerged, that I had not previously noticed. Perhaps it’s due to the small amount of late snow we received, which melted soon after it fell, clear and uncontaminated with dust and grime.

The effect I noticed was smooth ice surfaces, in endless shades of blue and white. The colours seem almost unnatural, but I suppose the purity of the ice and how it formed this year may have something to do with that.

In the image above, you can see deep blues where the snow must not have accumulated much versus the whiter areas, where it would appear snow has melted and refrozen. And, of course, there are the white cracks, crisscrossing the surface. I also like the mottled effect in the distance, which was harder to capture well from the angle I shot from.

The entire image has the look of a blue and white abstract painting, but it’s just nature showing off her own artistry, something I have been seeing a lot of lately and am happy for.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 125 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Reflected Cat-tails” – Secord Pond, Uxbridge

“Reflected Cat-tails” - Secord Pond, Uxbridge

The words “Seeing the extraordinary in everyday places.” has become a mantra for me. It resonates through my entire being. I’ve said before that I can’t seem to turn it off and would not want to.

 

As I walk the streets or hike the forest trails, I am able to see beauty almost everywhere. So, why would I want to turn that off. It becomes my connection with my Creator, a reminder of the marvelous detail that I miss when hurried. I revel in the quiet times, where it’s just me. Those solitary times are energizing for me, as I look around and notice a play of light, the soft motion of water, or plants in the breeze. Learning to effectively capture and sharing those moments bring me joy. As I sit and review my photos and try to put into words what that experience was like, I’m constantly reminded, that moment was in front of me to enjoy, a very brief part of an ongoing story in light, motion, and colour.

The inner creative in me likes to push boundaries and experiment with different ways of seeing things. I view other’s works, get inspired by images and words, to push my own boundaries and beliefs. As I share these experiments, I’m also sharing part of my journey, and opening an intimate part of my essence. Perhaps that journey resonates with others and brings them to the same place.

The image above is just such an experiment. I used an old Takumar 500mm f/5 lens that belonged to my father. For years I had considered selling it since it did not work with any of my cameras. Last week I acquired an adaptor that allowed me to use this lens for the first time in nearly thirty years. I had forgotten what a monster it is. Weighing in at nearly seven pounds and close to two feet long, this glass is not for the faint of heart and certainly not something I care to carry around on a regular basis.

I took it with me, along with a sturdy tripod, to Secord Pond, a small lake at a local conservation area.  While it was nice to make long telephoto images, I really enjoyed the effects it had when photographing the shoreline plants reflected in the water. Above, are cat-tails, reflected in the gently rippling water.

Nikon D200
Takumar 500 mm f/5 @ 500mm
1/60 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com