Tag Archives: series

“Papineau Creek Pines”

“Papineau Creek Pines”

“Ah, September! You are the doorway to the season that awakens my soul… but I must confess that I love you only because you are a prelude to my beloved October.” 
― Peggy Toney Horton

In a quiet, unmarked park, along the banks of Papineau Creek, stands a beautiful grove of red pines and balsam firs. Pathways wind between them, enticing me to take just a few more exploratory steps to see what lies beyond.

It’s a hot day, very hot for September, but I know October and cooler weather is inevitable. This is my first time really exploring this little gem of a park. It’s crisscrossed with paths and roadways, making it extremely accessible and quite open. So, as I explored, I made a few more photos. Many just snapshots and memories of a day spent with family and a few more deliberate ‘artsy’ images in my favourite abstract style.

I’m reviewing them slowly, enjoying what each image offers me, still not sure if I have a series or not. We’ll see what the next few days offer up.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Remnant”

“Remnant”

“All life is bound to a simple truth… that time goes on, that in each person’s life begins a tale, a tale that will either end in memory or in legend.”
― M.J. Chrisman

Here I am revisiting the dried flowers that I have kept from earlier in the spring. The textures and colours still fascinate me. Is this a weird thing, this enjoyment of the ‘expired’ flowers?

I have enough now to create a collection, and I am considering naming the series “Best Before”. For me, it’s really a study of flowers in an unconventional way. There is a certain beauty, which I have alluded to in previous posts. There is a delicacy, inherent with something that has dried out. The fine connecting tissues are weak and brittle, so handling them is a bit of an art in itself. Light transmits through them, as well as reflecting from them, creating interesting effects.

Consideration has also been give to really tight shots, where the flower itself is not recognizable, just the lines, textures, and colour, which has a certain curious appeal to me as I am editing, but I inevitably zoom back out to the whole once more.

So, this post is more of a series of thoughts than anything of substance, my way of processing my technique and considering next steps.

By the way, if you are curious, this daffodil was one of a grouping I shared earlier.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.6 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Study in Wood #3”

Study in Wood #3

“To dwellers in a wood, almost every species of tree has its voice as well as its feature.”
― Thomas Hardy

As I walk the trails, I can’t help but be amazed at the colours and textures of the stumps and standing dead trees along the way. I’ve started a collection of these aged and aging forest statues, each so unique in its appearance, yet somewhat similar. Some are recognizable as wood, while others, gnarled, twisted and covered in moss and fungus, take on the appearance of something slightly alien. Each tree species has its own unique character and form and tends to become habitat to specific mosses and other growths.

There are those that stand for years, bare and smooth, weathering the elements and bleaching in the sun, while others, fall and turn quickly into a spongy, mossy heap, home to mushrooms, mosses, and ferns.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com