Tag Archives: shore

“Cold Water Visitor”

“Cold Water Visitor”

“I am so grateful to be here on this awesome planet with its diverse life – everything we need to not just survive but to thrive. I am excited to continually learn more about it, and always curious to see what is going to come up next.”
― Jay Woodman

While photographing the Lake Ontario shore line recently, one of the thousands of Canada Geese floating offshore decided to give me a closer look. Most of the geese tend to be fairly tame, being in close proximity with humans in this area.

People and geese tend to occupy the same spaces, along the shore, in parks, and open fields. It becomes a bit of a problem when the geese get dependant on humans, who provide them food and the opportunity for food. In some parks, the geese don’t even migrate south anymore, since they have all they need. That becomes an even bigger problem when the temperatures drop, which has been fairly infrequent her in the past few years. But, deep drops in temperature can freeze even large bodies of water like Lake Ontario. We’ve had some mild winters, but extended cold spells are a game changer, sometimes leaving the geese without the open water they need.

In any case, this one wanted to get a closer look at me. I tend not to photograph the Canada Geese much, primarily because they are so commonplace around here. This one made me look again. As it emerged from the frigid waters, small drops of water glistened on its breast feathers, like small jewels in the late afternoon sun, and it posed so nicely for me, I simply could not resist the opportunity.

There’s also the small pile of melting snow to the left, a reminder that winter is not quite finished with us here.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 70mm
1/320 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“The Icy Fingers of March”

“The Icey Fingers of March”

“Winter teetered on the verge of succumbing to the returning sun, but today the breeze still preferred the touch of snowflakes”
― Rue

Many miles from the tropical shores of the Sea of Cortez, which I have so fondly remembered of late, lies another shoreline. The shore of Lake Ontario. In stark contrast to the warm sands and tropical breezes of Baja, these shores, transitioning from the icy grip of winter to the milder days of spring, still show significant evidence of the extremes in temperatures the region has recently seen and the raw beauty of this magnificent lake, when conditions are right.

Just last week, temperatures plummeted and a severe winter storm passed through. The sub-zero temperatures and high winds, whipped Lake Ontario into a monster not to be trifled with. All that remains as evidence, is the otherworldly landscape along the shores. Bizarre icicles drip from the branches exposed to chilly waters, now beginning to melt as the air slowly loses its chill and the sun gradually warms the frozen shores.

This scene, like a passage into another realm, invokes thoughts of transition, from one world, frozen, yet beautiful, to another, warm and welcoming. Late afternoon light beams through the ice, lighting it, as if from within, causing it to almost glow with its own energy. The waves rolling in, are slightly warmer than the ice and begin to melt it from below.

Spring seemed so willing to move in earlier in the month, but the remainder of winter decided to make its presence known with, what we hope, is one final show. Though it may look nice in the photo, the winds coming off the lake are still cold enough to give us frozen fingers of our own, but hopefully, not for much longer.

iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8
1/640 sec;   f/1.8;   ISO 20

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Blue Flag Iris” – Marble Lake

Southern Blue Flag

“While there is perhaps a province in which the photograph can tell us nothing more than what we see with our own eyes, there is another in which it proves to us how little our eyes permit us to see.”
― Dorothea Lange

I find myself working with photos that did not quite communicate my vision as intended. I see so much more in my composition, but struggle to articulate just what that is. When that ‘something’ does not present itself, or can’t be extracted in the final product I call these my ‘seconds’. I don’t delete them, but rather, I hang onto them with the intent of revisiting them at some future date as my editing skills grow or I am better able to extract that ‘essence’ that I first saw or felt when I made the image. There are also some great plugins out there that enhance the image enough for me that I get closer to what I wanted.

My recent go-to is Topaz Impression, which allows me to create painterly effects that are closer to how I imagined the image when I composed the shot .

The irises pictured above grow along the shores of a small lake where our family spends much of the summer. My days are generally spent reading, canoeing, and photographing. I do like combining the latter activities and find some nice images offered me as I glide slowly along the shore.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/13.0, ISO 5600

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“York River Backcountry”

York River Backcountry

“I thought how lovely and how strange a river is. A river is a river, always there, and yet the water flowing through it is never the same water and is never still. It’s always changing and is always on the move. And over time the river itself changes too. It widens and deepens as it rubs and scours, gnaws and kneads, eats and bores its way through the land.”
― Aidan Chambers

The York River, in Central Ontario runs from Baptiste Lake, meanders through the region and changing its aspect several times along its course. It is inaccessible, other than by canoe through much of its journey.

I’ve hiked to many of the chutes and paddled several sections of this beautiful river. Yesterday, I went for a back-country drive, looking for a diversion from wildflowers, though I found many of them too.

During this drive I came across a road named Iron  Bridge Road. The name got my attention and I proceeded to see where this “Iron Bridge” was, hoping I was not committing to a long drive, only to find that there used to be an iron bridge.

The bridge itself was not far down the road and I was pleasantly surprised to discover that it cross the York River and offered a nice view of the river as it wound its way through the back-country as a gentle flow, with lily pads and arrowroot growing along the shores. From my maps, it would appear it continues this way for several miles, before entering into a series of rapids and chutes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Balancing on a Log”

“Balanced on a Log”

“There are moments when I wish I could roll back the clock and take all the sadness away, but I have a feeling that if I did, the joy would be gone as well. So I take the memories as they come, accepting them all, letting them guide me whenever I can.” 

― Nicholas Sparks

While on a recent excursion to Lynde Shores, a conservation area on the shores of Lake Ontario, for some bird photos, I took a few minutes to walk the lake shore and enjoy the gently rolling waves. The stone ‘beach’ is made up of water polished rocks of varying sizes. I used some of these rocks, stacked on a piece of driftwood, to make this balanced stone sculpture. Just a bit of whimsey to share with you today.

As to the photo itself: I narrowed the aperture just enough to keep the stones in focus, while allowing the background to blur

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 270mm

1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“November Fraser Shores” – Fraser Lake, Ontario

"November Fraser Shores"

A look back to last month, when I spent a few rain soaked days in the Fraser Lake area. This photo, made from the boat launch at the north end of the lake, encompasses a lot of what those days were like. It was still quite mild for mid-November, but a slow moving low pressure system had set up and filled three solid days with off and on rain, mist, and variable winds.

The mist created the nice layered effect of the trees on the far shore, while mid-frame, a few late migrating ducks take a rest just off shore.

For friends of mine who know the lake, you can see the Fraser Lake Camp ‘barge’ resting on the dock as well as the connecting bridge that spans the dual swimming docks.

For me, the image portrays the ‘resting’ time between a busy active summer on the lake and the inevitable winter to come. It’s a bit melancholy and that is the reason I chose to produce the image as a black and white.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/30 sec, @ f/2.8 -0.33, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website
http://www.edlehming.com

Misty Morning on Marble Lake

“Misty Morning on Marble Lake”

A classic scene to those of us who spend time in the north.

After a cool night, the waters of the lake are warmer than the surrounding air and a thick fog forms. As the sun rises higher in the sky the fog begins to rise higher and higher to eventually form small clouds. The small clouds eventually join together to form larger clouds. It’s a fascinating process to watch. I often look up at summer clouds and wonder what lake that cloud came from.

Last Sunday was no exception. The warming sun played across the lake as mist swirled and rose higher and higher. The warm glow of the rising sun shone on the distant shoreline in golden hues.

For me, it’s such a calming scene and I could spend day after day watching each new day dawning, just like this.

I hope you enjoy the view.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm @ 240mmm
1/160 sec @ f/6.3 ISO 2500