Tag Archives: simple

“Crimson Splash” 

“Crimson Splash”

“It is always the simple that produces the marvelous. “
– Amelia Barr

Though fairly similar to my “Autumn Creeps In” image, this one is different enough to stand on its own. The autumn leaves of the Red Maple fairly glow among the thin shimmering veil of pine needles and their pale greens and oranges. It’s late summer, the last weekend of summer and it’s hot, really hot as a late season heat wave exerts itself on the forest.

I suppose that’s why the green undergrowth is so lush, deep green and thriving. It’s quite a contrast between summer and autumn in one place. There is life here, cycles of life and never ending change. Even the reds and greens, speak of stop and go. The very nature of nature, at the Papineau Bend, and lovely little park carved from the forest along the banks of Papineau Creek.

These scenes of healthy nature are nourishing for me to reflect on. I imagine myself standing in this place and time, making photos and loving just existing here. Perhaps images to carry me through the upcoming winter, which, while beautiful in its own way, pales in comparison to a green and thriving late summer forest.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

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“Meadow in a Vase” 

“Meadow in a Vase”

“Take one flower that you like and get lots of them. And don’t try to ‘arrange’ them. It’s surprisingly hard to do a flower arrangement the way a florist does one. Instead, bunch them all together or put them in a series of small vases all down the table. “
– Ina Garten

As I finished my studio work with a few local wildflowers, I stuck them in a vase, to eventually sit on our kitchen table. That’s a secondary benefit of my studio work. There is almost always a flower or flowers in a vase after the shoot.

As I looked over at the small flower collection, I thought it would make a nice image as well, even though I tend to avoid showing the containers for my floral shots. This one, though simple, seemed to work well and shows of the flowers, Wild Bergamot and Yellow Coneflower nicely. So, here it is for your enjoyment and consideration.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
20sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Forsythia”

“Forsythia”

“The greatest wealth is to live content with little.”
― Plato

This turned out to a very simple image. I was given a few stems of forsythia to transplant in may garden and took the opportunity to make a few photos before they dropped their flowers.

I recall having one of these early blooming shrubs in the backyard growing up and then they seemed to vanish for a while. But recently , I’ve seen them more prevalent and it was nice to be offered a few shoots to try to root. I’m hoping they take hold, so we have a bit more colour in our yard in the spring.

Even these flowers, in their simplicity, are quite fascinating when you look closer.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.0 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Big Bite” – Chickadee with Seed

“Big Bite” - Chickadee with Seed

“There is no mundane dimension really, if you have the eyes to see it, it is all transcendental.”
― Terence McKenna

The view from my back window yesterday afternoon, as the birds returned for a feed. I posted several images of other local birds in late December and the simple chickadees, who are frequent visitors, were omitted. I began questioning myself on that. Why was I ‘editing’ what I shared? Is the humble chickadee less worthy than the bright cardinal or more elusive nuthatch? Will the photo not impress and get more likes. Have I gotten to that point? I certainly hope not. I’ve always enjoyed seeing beauty in the mundane and sharing those moments; I don’t ever want to lose that gift, especially in these superficial times.

So, as I considered the  image again, and looked at all the wonderful details in this ‘common’ bird, I found myself seeing it anew. The soft pastel orange of the belly feathers, the fine details in the delicate wings, and incredible details in and around the eyes, often missed because they move around so quickly.

The other thing that struck me, and inspired the title of the photo was the size of the seeds that the chickadee choose. He’d land, pick one, and then fly away with it, as another bird took his place. Never once did more than one bird occupy the dish. They waited, swooped in, took a seed, and departed, for the better part of the afternoon. Then, the cycle stopped and none returned, even though there was still food in the dish.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom @ 300mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Dogbane Blossoms” – near Maynooth, Ontario

“Dogbane Blossoms” - near Maynooth, Ontario

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature.  
Anne Frank

Such a menacing name for such a beautiful, delicate flower. But, the Dogbane plant’s latin name, apocynum cannabinum, means “poisonous to dogs”.

This is another new plant to me. I noticed the white/pink blossoms as I was photographing a nearby creek, so I made a photo of the flowers and leaves, intent on identifying it at a later time.

This year, I have been much more deliberate about learning about the plants and animals I encounter during my time in nature. I’ve spent my whole life enjoying the outdoors, hiking, hunting, and fishing ,but never really cared much about the names of the lesser known plants. It’s been a great year and I have expanded my knowledge significantly. I’m also more observant about the cycles of these plants and where to find them. It has given me a great deal of pleasure and sense of being connected with the cycles of nature.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com