Tag Archives: spring

“Lily of the Valley – Convallaria majalis”

“Lily of the Valley - Convallaria majalis”

“I miss your fragrance, sometimes I miss it this much that I can clearly smell you in the air.” 
― Qaisar Iqbal Janjua

Just in time for the last day of May. This has been a very delayed year for many of our spring flowers, here in Ontario. These just started blooming last week and I was happy to see a few remained for me to photograph.

The fragrance of lily of the valley is among my favourite scents and the memory of that smell brings back so many special times for me: gardening as a child, with my grandmother and father, my wedding day (we had lilacs and lily of the valley from our home and my wife’s family home as our flower arrangements and in the bouquet), as well as the birth of our first child, in May, 26 years ago. Lily of the valley and its wonderful sweetness was part of all those moments. I do miss it, when it’s not blooming, but the memory remains.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3.0sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

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“The Greening”

“The Greening”

“Time moves forward don’t live backwards” 
― E’yen A. Gardner

Spring, that time of year when the Earth groans and stretches after a winter slumber. Freshness is everywhere and the forest is transformed as branches begin to fill with fresh green leaves. Buds open and expand their contents to the sun, reaching for nourishment.

This ‘greening’ only seems to last a few days and the forest is a soft canvas of greens and yellows and every shade between. It’s a few days of completed freshness, before the insects begin feasting and the sun slowly dries and bleaches the colours. Many of the leaves, like these, will darken more as chlorophyll fills the cells. But for now, for this brief time, I will revel in the soft ‘greening’ of spring.

It’s a reminder to me, as the quote states, that life and time move forward, without exception, as the cycle continues toward summer, never the same, always new and slightly different.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/1000 sec, f/7.1, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Marble Lake Columbine”

“Marble Lake Columbine”

“Even the tiniest of flowers can have the toughest roots.” 
― Shannon Mullen

Wildflowers constantly amaze me, in their endless forms and the environments they thrive it.

The columbine above, is a native to Ontario and this particular plant was growing from a thin crack in the bedrock. I suppose there was just enough organic mater accumulated in that crack to create the rich soil the columbine prefers and a seed from nearby pants happened to land in just the right place. It’s surprising that such a seemingly delicate plant can thrive in the northern wilderness, in a region where there was still frost in the forest when I made this image.

My biggest challenge in creating this image, as with most macro images, is trying to get a shot between the breezes that kept moving the flower back and forth. Even slight movement makes the shot blurry.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/40sec, f/7.1, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Star of Bethlehem – 2018”

“Star of Bethlehem -2018”

“If only these treasures were not so fragile as they are precious and beautiful.” 
― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

I find myself surveying my gardens, as the cycle of spring takes a firm hold. Tulips and daffodils are now dried remnants, these once beautiful ‘first’ colours. They welcomed the first few mild days with their bright faces and filled our sense of smell with their sweet fragrance.

Now, the next wave of flowers fills these spaces. Among them, Star of Bethlehem, with its delicate white blossoms. This is one of many plants retrieved from my mother-in-law’s gardens when she moved out of her house a few years ago. We really had no idea what we were bringing home, only that her plants were a very essential part of her and we welcomed them to our gardens.

Since then, every spring, a new mystery blossom would surface and wait to be identified. This plant was among them and is a very lovely addition to our flower beds.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1.6 sec, f/40.0, ISO 400 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring Fire”

“Keep a little fire burning; however small, however hidden.”

― Cormac McCarthy

It’s not often that I revisit a subject, especially a flower. However, I felt this one needed to be viewed a bit closer in a slightly different composition. So, here it is. The slightly different angle even changed the title for me. I see more of the ‘fire’ in this lovely tulip than I had before.

I find it interesting what even a slight shift in vantage point an do to things. In fact, I think I prefer this composition more than my previous version from a few days ago. There seems to be more energy and depth in this version and the light seems to play off the foliage a bit more.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
3 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Trillium Trio”

“With brightness and purity like the snow which so recently trapped it, the trillium remembers winter while signalling spring”
– Ed Lehming

Though I posted a photo of a newly blossomed trillium a few weeks ago, the trilliums in Eastern Ontario, Bancroft, to be more specific, are a bit delayed. Warm air did not arrive here until recently, and with the warm air, new life and growth.

Though there is still frost in the ground in the deeper recesses of the forest, the plant life is starting to take hold here as well. As I made this image, I was considering the wonderful whiteness of the trillium blossoms and the recent snow. The connection inspired the short quote I made for the image.

I can’t think of another flower that is so brilliantly white. They seem so delicate, yet a blossom trapped by a fallen leaf, will tear the leaf apart to open. So, they may seem delicate but as with much in nature, there is a hidden strength in persistence.

It’s beauty is made more special by its brevity, as soon as it warms up enough, their flowers will fade into the memory of the forest and leave room for other plants, though the leaves remain bright and strong all summer long.

iPhone 7 @ 3.99mm
1/90 sec, f/1.8, ISO 20

“High Water”

“Gentle spring waves wash high upon the shore, drenching the land with moisture and restoring life, winter is at an end.”
– Ed Lehming

A few short weeks ago, Marble Lake was still ice covered and winter ruled, refusing to relinquish its hold on the land. A deep freeze and late snowfall meant frost remained locked into the ground, blocking the flow of melt water, channeling it on new courses.

The ice is gone, yet the water is bone-chillingly cold. Swimming will have to wait a few more weeks.

As I travelled north to our camper this long weekend, I noticed that some lakes were seemingly lower than others, appearing as if water had been quite high at sometime and found a release, leaving its mark on the shore.

It’s been a very different spring and was particularly noticeable as I went for a hike in the forest behind our camper. Unlike the forests near home, where wildflowers have burst forth almost overnight, growth I delayed here in the Bancroft region. Trilliums have just started to bloom, sorrel is ready to bloom today, if it warms up enough. It’s a mixed bag of plants and their ability to adapt to this chilly spring.

Even the black flies, the scourge of the Boreal forest are slow to emerge, but they have, just not feeding yet. I’m sure that will change soon enough.

Today, I am hoping to get a hike in to Egan Chute, one of my favourite local cascades, to get some updated photos.

iPhone 7
1/4000 sec, f/1.8, ISO 20