Tag Archives: St. Patrick’s

“Baptismal Elements” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Baptismal Elements” - St. Patricks, Cathedral New York

“The Church does not dispense the sacrament of baptism in order to acquire for herself an increase in membership but in order to consecrate a human being to God and to communicate to that person the divine gift of birth from God.”
― Hans Urs von Balthasar

I can’t fully explain what it was that attracted me to this composition. Yet, I find myself processing that very though in this post.

The golden urn and bowl seemed to stand out from other elements around them. The soft, natural light playing on the mottled gray walls further enhanced the image by isolating the table in the foreground.

It’s a simple scene really, and reminds me a bit of the still life paintings in the Dutch Golden Age style, with their bright golden tones and simple depictions of everyday items.

I also thought this composition might make a nice church bulletin cover, celebrating baptism, which is something I used to produce regularly a few years back. The table seems to be ready and waiting, prepared for something to happen.

Nikon D300
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

 

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“Altar of St. John the Baptist” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Altar of St. John the Baptist” - St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New .jpg

And he was preaching, and saying, “After me One is coming who is mightier than I, and I am not fit to stoop down and untie the thong of His sandals. “I baptized you with water; but He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.” – Mark 1:7-8

Existing light photography offers its challenges and rewards. This wonderful statue of St. John the Baptist, in New York’s St. Patrick’s cathedral is a good example of how existing light can enhance the image. The light is soft and warm and produces a sense of peace, at least for me. The light falls off a bit near the top of the image, bringing out the details of the face.

That’s the benefit, the challenge is having to use a high ISO often introduces unwanted noise, which used to be a significant issue with 35 mm film, but is less of an issue with our modern DSLRs and editing software.

I made several other images while visiting this great metropolitan cathedral, which I will share over time.

Nikon D300
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Lady Chapel” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Lady Chapel” - Saint Patrick Cathedral - New York

“When introverts go to church, we crave sanctuary in every sense of the word, as we flee from the disorienting distractions of twenty-first-century life. We desire to escape from superficial relationships, trivial communications and the constant noise that pervade our world, and find rest in the probing depths of God’s love.”
― Adam S. McHugh

I have real love of sacred places. Cathedrals are such humbling places, filled with quiet places to sooth the soul and vast humbling spaces that force the eyes to the heavens, yet make us look inward. They are also architectural wonders where I lose myself in the complexity of mighty columns and soaring arches.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City is no exception. It is a vast, marvelous, church built of rich white marble, and surrounded by the busy shops of 5th Avenue, yet offers worshipers and visitors alike, moments of peace and reflection. The cathedral itself was built between 1858 and 1879 in a Gothic Revival style and the Lady Chapel (above) was added in 1906.

For such a vast place, there are many places, such as the Lady Chapel, where you can separate from the tourists and their ever present selfie-sticks, to reflect and pray in a peaceful place. The Lady Chapel is off limits to cameras, which is a great thing, yet I wanted to capture the wonder of this sacred place, and was able to accomplish it, from a distance, with my long lense, without disturbing the sanctity of this important worship space.

As with my earlier image of the Pieta,  I shot with existing light, to capture the natural colours and textures, while not disturbing the space with a bright flash. It is, after all, a place of worship and should be respected.The warmth of this space is particularly appealing to me, accented by the wonderful sea-blue of the stained glass windows.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1,000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Pieta” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“The Pieta” - St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“As he reached the door of the chapel and turned back for a last look, he saw that the Virgin too was sad and lonely; the most alone human being God ever put on earth.”
― Irving Stone

The word ‘pieta’ means pity in Italian. The scene of the Virgin Mary, with the recently crucified Christ on her lap, is one of the most iconic scenes in christianity and has been interpreted through many forms of art, including sculpture. The most famous of these sculptures is, of course, Michelangelo’s version, housed in St. Peter’s basilica in Rome.

This rendition sits just right and slightly behind the main altar at St. Patrick’s in New York City, was sculpted in 1906 by William Ordway Partridge, and was donated to the cathedral in 1915. It is about three times the size of Michelangelo’s version and is one of the church’s many treasures.

I made the image using existing light because of how it lit the statue so softly and kept Mary’s face in the shadows of her shawl. I’m also averse to using a flash in a place of worship. It really is a beautiful statue and tells a powerful story of a mother’s love and loss.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1,000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com