Tag Archives: studio

“Meadow in a Vase” 

“Meadow in a Vase”

“Take one flower that you like and get lots of them. And don’t try to ‘arrange’ them. It’s surprisingly hard to do a flower arrangement the way a florist does one. Instead, bunch them all together or put them in a series of small vases all down the table. “
– Ina Garten

As I finished my studio work with a few local wildflowers, I stuck them in a vase, to eventually sit on our kitchen table. That’s a secondary benefit of my studio work. There is almost always a flower or flowers in a vase after the shoot.

As I looked over at the small flower collection, I thought it would make a nice image as well, even though I tend to avoid showing the containers for my floral shots. This one, though simple, seemed to work well and shows of the flowers, Wild Bergamot and Yellow Coneflower nicely. So, here it is for your enjoyment and consideration.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
20sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Yellow Coneflower – Ratibita pinnata”

“Yellow Coneflower - Ratibita pinnata”

“Some painters transform the sun into a yellow spot, others transform a yellow spot into the sun. “
– Pablo Picasso

The Yellow Coneflowers literally quiver in the slight breeze, their delicate petals, like small yellow rags, seem to barely hang on.

Such is the scene in a local field, where Yellow Coneflowers are common. Even the gentle breeze of a hot summer day create movement in these flowers. It’s very nice to look at, but proves a challenge to photograph. Thus, I made the decision to harvest a blossom for the studio.

It was an opportunity to really look deep into the structures that make up this delicate summer blossom, from the tender yellow petals to the complex structure of the ‘cone’ from which the plant takes its name.

It was a bit of a tough shot to light, the petals so bright and the details of the cone, lost in shadow, yet it turned out alright and drew my attention to the small green frills, known as ‘sepals’ through which the petals emerge. The things we don’t notice, show up in the right light.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Wild Bergamot – Mondarda fistulosa”

“Wild Bergamot - Mondarda fistulosa”

“Little things seem nothing, but they give peace, like those meadow flowers which individually seem odorless but all together perfume the air.”
– Georges Bernanos

Have you noticed the summer shift to purple and yellow? The pattern repeats. There is a gradual shift from pinks to purples and yellows. Thistles, bergamot, vervain for purples, yellow coneflower, sunflower, wood sorrel, and sunflower for yellow.

It’s a definite shift in colours and the pollinators, which are plentiful this year, seem to favour purple.

Wild Bergamot, or Bee Balm is plentiful in the local meadows and conservation areas. The vast clumps are literally ‘abuzz’ with bees and wasps of all shapes and sizes. The Wild Bergamot flower is a fascinating thing, appearing quite ragged, yet wonderfully complex at the same time.

I thought it would make a nice subject for a studio shot and I was not disappointed. This image gives me a chance to look at the wonderful, intricate structures that make up the blossom. It could only have been better if a bee had come with it, I did try to use my portable studio setup, but it was just too breezy today for a good outdoor shot. So, here you have it. Let the flower work its magic on you, drawing you into the frills that the bees are so fond of.

This is an immature blossom, with many underdeveloped florets, but beautiful nonetheless. There will be more to follow, be certain of that. Hopefully, the next few days offer the opportunity for an outdoor shot, without the need to pick a flower. Perhaps a bee may join in?

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/36.0, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
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http://www.edlehming.com

 

“Return of the Day Lilies”

“Return of the Day Lilies”

“Be music always. Keep changing the keys, tones, pitch, and volume of each of the songs you create along your life’s journey and play on.” 
― Suzy Kassem

Today marks just about a year since I started into my studio based floral photographs. What started in my mind, as I drove past ripe wheat fields, as a vision of photographing some of the wheat under controlled lighting, quickly changed gears when those images did not materialize as I had envisioned them.

At that time, the day lilies in our gardens were blooming and I took a few in to see how they would look. After fiddling with my exposure settings and using my trusty 70-200mm zoom lens, since I did not own a macro lense at the time, I got images that stunned me. I could not believe how the isolation against the black velvet backdrop made the flower ‘pop’ and fine details emerged so clearly.

There has been no turning back from this. Though I enjoy being in the outdoors and photographing the wild world around me, there is a satisfaction in these florals. They continue to stun me with their vibrancy and detail and I enjoy the process of composition. The lighting and settings have become second nature. It’s just a matter of having enough subject matter to photograph.

So, to mark this milestone in my photographic journey, I decided to grab a stem of day lily and bring it to the studio for a couple of quick shots, two to be precise. This is the first one. I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed making it.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.5 sec, f/32.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Beginnings”

“Beginnings”

“Maybe I don’t have enough beginnings in my life because I fought against the endings that were about to birth those beginnings.” 
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

As I surveyed my gardens this morning, I noticed that several of my purple cone flowers were already in full bloom, a nice change from last year when heat and drought caused them to put out very small, underdeveloped flowers, just big enough to produce some scant seed.

The flowers and even the stems this year are quite large, though some of the larger flowers are showing some hail damage from a few weeks back. There are, however, several large blossoms beginning to form into flowers. They are quite pretty in their underdeveloped state and catch the light nicely.

I’ve left this one in its natural state, including the many spider threads between the petals. It seems every flower has its resident spider, but this one seems to have temporarily vacated the premises. I like this ‘natural’ look, including the webs as it documents all the detail we often miss from a distance or first glance, a recurring theme for me lately.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.3  sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Remnant”

“Remnant”

“All life is bound to a simple truth… that time goes on, that in each person’s life begins a tale, a tale that will either end in memory or in legend.”
― M.J. Chrisman

Here I am revisiting the dried flowers that I have kept from earlier in the spring. The textures and colours still fascinate me. Is this a weird thing, this enjoyment of the ‘expired’ flowers?

I have enough now to create a collection, and I am considering naming the series “Best Before”. For me, it’s really a study of flowers in an unconventional way. There is a certain beauty, which I have alluded to in previous posts. There is a delicacy, inherent with something that has dried out. The fine connecting tissues are weak and brittle, so handling them is a bit of an art in itself. Light transmits through them, as well as reflecting from them, creating interesting effects.

Consideration has also been give to really tight shots, where the flower itself is not recognizable, just the lines, textures, and colour, which has a certain curious appeal to me as I am editing, but I inevitably zoom back out to the whole once more.

So, this post is more of a series of thoughts than anything of substance, my way of processing my technique and considering next steps.

By the way, if you are curious, this daffodil was one of a grouping I shared earlier.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1.6 sec, f/36.0 ISO 100

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Chive Flower”

“Chive Flower”

“I simply can’t look into the heavens on a crisp starry night and somehow bring myself to believe that the gaping expanse that engulfs the whole of me is the product of chance happenstance. And neither can I believe that the gaping expanse that rests within me is anything less.”
― Craig D. Lounsbrough

The quote above has resonated with me for some time, and applies just as well as we view the macro universe. The incredible precision and ‘design’, if you will, of even a simple blossom like a chive, cannot be mere chance. The more I observe, the deeper I go, the more I’m struck with the incredible diversity of design, each with a specific purpose, unique to that plant, and the environment in which it exists.

I’ve always liked the flowers that chives produce but had not considered, until today, that they are not just fuzzy purple tufts, but rather, a complex group of individula flowers. This should not have come as a surprise, but it did.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
0.5 sec, f/32.0 ISO 400

High Resolution image on 500px

or more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com