Tag Archives: summer

“Intrusion”

“Intrusion”

“Nature knows no pause in progress and development, and attaches her curse on all inaction.  “
– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

The title for this image came to me immediately. It is driven by the essence of ‘how’ I photograph. I refrain from most things man-made. Sometimes it can be as innocuous as a well groomed path through the woods, preferring to imagine things as purely as possible, untouched by humans, rare though that is nowadays.

In this image, part of my recent “Papineau Bend” series, a stone BBQ pit stands in the forefront, an intruder to this lovely place. Yet, at some point in time, the fire pit was built for the enjoyment of families who visited this peaceful sanctuary along the shores of Papineau Creek. Were it not for this park being carved from the woods I may never have discovered this place. Time has had its effect on the park though and the BBQ is showing definite signs that nature will eventually have her way, through a gradual and unrelenting wearing down. Frost, rain, roots, and various plants are creating ever widening cracks in the cement, offering larger footholds for nature to pry apart the stonework, returning it to the earth.

Despite the intrusion, the overall scene of the pines remains one of beauty that I wanted to share through another of my photo abstractions, bright, late summer sunshine lighting up the delicate needles of the pines and hemlocks. Just reflecting back on the moment when I made this image lightens my heart and beckons me back to this place, intrusions or not.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100 

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“First Reds”

“First Reds”

“The difference between darkness and brightness is how you thrive on those moments and how you use such circumstances with goodwill in your spirit.” 
― Angelica Hopes

Here we are nearing the end of September, and the end of summer. I was surprised to see just how much colour change is already occurring not too far north of my home. As my family and I drove through the North hastings region of Ontario this past weekend, I especially noticed than some of the maples had already turned bright red. Sadly, I’m not sure what species of maple this is but it sure stood out.

I simply had to make an abstract of it. As with many of these, the finer details don’t get noticed till captured in a photo. I was subtly aware of the colour appearing in the undergrowth, but it really showed up in the photo. There was also a dead tree, bleached white by the sun, which really popped, especially in the photo.

This image is part of a small series I have posted over the past few days, all made within a few hundred meters of each other on Papineau Creek.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/29.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Early Colours on Papineau Creek”

“Early Colours on Papineau Creek”

“Fall has always been my favorite season. The time when everything bursts with its last beauty, as if nature had been saving up all year for the grand finale.” 
― Lauren DeStefano

I’m considering starting another series based on this past weekend, enjoying the Bancroft Area Studio tour and the natural beauty of the North Hasting Highlands area, which we drove through as part of the tour.

This has been a very strange year indeed. As we drove from studio to studio, I noticed many of the leaves had already begun to change colour. For those who follow my blog regularly, you will know that we have had an excessively wet summer, and a bit cooler than usual. Well, that all changed a few weeks ago and we are now experiencing a dry spell and temperatures more appropriate for July. So, it’s really strange to have it feel like mid-summer yet see fall colours starting. The trend is supposed to continue for at least another week.

The image above was made at one of my favorite rest stops in the area. A small, unmarked park along the shores of Papineau Creek. I stopped here for lunch with my family and decided to make a few images before cooling off in the creek.

Adding the element of water had a nice effect on the image, but it’s the only one like it, the rest are images of the forest. Like I said, I may make a short series of them and wanted to start out with this one as I consider the other images.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/20.0, ISO 100 

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Into the Green Veil”

“Into the Green Veil”

“The Green Veil shimmers richly around me,
in tones of deepest emerald and muted olive;
a dominating threshold between earth and sky.
Yet, through this veil, 
gold light pierces and shimmers,
lighting the path and bright undergrowth,
in a dance of life and light.”
– Ed Lehming

I’ve been wanting to create a new series of images for some time, but the greens of summer, while lovely and filled with life, do not generally lend themselves to the photo abstractions I love so much.

Yesterday I felt inspired to get out for an early lunchtime walk and took my camera with me, as I often do, hoping for some inspiration. It did not take long, but a chance venture off my regular route brought me into an area of the forest with the most beautiful late summer light I have experienced this year. The forest surrounding me felt magical and filled me with joy. I had to do something with this moment, as it just felt right.

I made several images, reviewing each in my camera’s viewfinder. My abstraction technique is unpredictable and every single shot is slightly different, due to changes in the light and my movement. I was quite pleased with the resulting photos and believed I had enough material to create a new series of photos. The problem was, since it was a late summer forest, everything had a green cast to it. The human eye filters this out and we see a forest, but the camera is not so forgiving.

This green cast was bothering me and I was looking at ways to minimize it, without affecting the colours of the forest. Finally, I just gave up and processed and image, posting it on my blog yesterday for feedback, still having no idea what I would title this series. My last series: God Light, was quite easy to name, since it focussed on the wonderful patches of light that are created in forests. Those same patches exist in the summer too, as evidenced in the image above. But, what to call this summer series.

One of the followers of my blog David – It’s Complicated, wrote back with comments on the image and that they “like the color and effect of the green “veil”. Then it came to me, the “Green Veil” is dominant in all the images, and when I see it as a crucial element to the photo, I’m no longer inclined to remove it, but rather enhance its effect on the photos.

So, here’s the start of the “Into the Green Veil” series, the first image, above, is of the path leading into this forest glade. The title is also a bit of a play on words, as I was walking into a ‘vale’ as well.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/4 sec, f/13.0, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“The Day Beckons”

A beautiful, cool dawn on Bancroft’s Marble Lake. The mist swirls gently on the water’s surface, as the sun rises behind a low ridge.   A pattern repeated throughout the summer, each time, slightly different.

In the distance, Blue Jays screech high in the trees and the world awakens as the sunlight reaches further every minute. A new day begins. 

“Yellow-collared Scape Moth” – Cisseps fulvicollis

“Yellow-collared Scape Moth” - Cisseps fulvicollis

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”
– Marcel Proust

It seems to be butterfly and bug week for me. Butterflies, especially, have been sparse this year, though small months are plentiful, yet elusive. The butterflies also serve as subject matter as flowering plants seem to be in a transition phase, many is seed and others just budding.

When I went hiking during yesterday’s eclipse, I found that most insect life seemed quite subdued, except for mosquitoes, who welcomed the early dusk as an extended mealtime. As I passed a small cluster of Joe-Pye Weed, I spotted this colourful flying insect. Having no idea what it was, I photographed it with the intention of looking it up on my return home, which is my practice lately.

I thought this was some form of fly and was surprised to find out that it is a moth. It did not fit the common form of moths around here. Yet, when I look more closely, it does have all the characteristics of a moth.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com