Tag Archives: sunlight

“Grounded Sunlight”

“Grounded Sunlight”

“Shafts of delicious sunlight struck down onto the forest floor and overhead you could see a blue sky between the tree tops.” 
― C.S. Lewis

Light does some amazing things. As a photographer, light is everything and my eyes are quite tuned to the unique characteristics of light. Anything out of the ordinary resonates with me and automatically draws me to it.

This was the case on a hot and rainy hike this past weekend. Despite the rain, sunlight regularly broke through and the effects were often magical.

In this scene, the sun caught a patch of undergrowth whose leaves had turned yellow from our recent drought. It’s like the sun saying, “Wake up!” or simply pulling me towards this patch of ground to spend more time considering it. Which I did, as I was curious about the early colour change among the canopy of deep summer greens. What was not apparent to me at the time was just how much of this golden light reflected back up to bathe the bases of the trees. This effect hows up nicely in the photo.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/11.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Variable Light” – Uxbridge, Ontario

“Variable Light” - Uxbridge, Ontario

“The sun was as flirty as Scarlett O’Hara with the Tarleton twins, breaking through the clouds in spectacular bursts that seemed like personal favors and then retreating for hours, days, and making us all ache for just a glimpse.”
― Lorna Landvik

Another fine early November day in southern Ontario, and a return to Secord Conservation Area, in search of a few images. The day could be defined most accurately by its variable light, as a low cloud deck drifted lazily above, casting patches of bright light across the landscape. The trees had recently dropped their leaves, blanketing the ground beneath them in gold. The rays of sunshine breaking through the clouds made these leaves glow warmly. It’s a effect of autumn and it’s soft light that I really enjoy and it’s really accented when the light is variable and patchy, contrasting nicely against the darker area and the clouds moody clouds above.

I’ve photographed from this location many times. There is something so beautiful about teh gently rolong hills and how thier lines flow togother. An ebb and flow of colour and light, fallow fields and pasturelands, diveded by rail fences and tree lines. Each layer a new scene to be enjoyed.

Recent high winds and a light snow cover have obliterated the neatly arranged leaves and dulled their colours as winter approaches, but I’m still looking for a few bright days and some of these glimpses into the autumn which has extended nicely.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 75 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Dance in the Light”

“Dance in the Light”

“Any patch of sunlight in a wood will show you something about the sun which you could never get from reading books on astronomy. These pure and spontaneous pleasures are ‘patches of Godlight’ in the woods of our experience.”
― C.S. Lewis

The light in the forest last week was beautiful and brief. I was able to make a series of these forest ‘abstractions’ while on a short lunchtime walk. All were made within a few hundred meters of each other and then, the light was gone and the forest settled into an autumn gloom.

So, drink in this warmth, this “Godlight’, and dance like the trees of the forest in a gentle breeze. Reach your arms to the sky and turn your head to bathe in the warmth of the autumn sun, for inevitably, this gift will fade, and snow and cold will slow our step.

The golden glow was caused by bright yellow maple leaves which covered the forest floor, between the delicate new growth, on a gently sloping hillside. In the distance, some vestiges of green still shine through.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/4 sec, f/25.0, ISO 200

High resolution image can be viewed on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Bull Thistle Revisited”

“Bull Thistle Revisited”

“After the wet spring, everything that could turn green had outdone itself in greenness and everything that could even dream of blooming or blossoming was in bloom and blossom. The sunlight was a benediction. The breezes were so caressingly soft and intimate on the skin as to be embarrassing.”
― Dan Simmons

This is an image of the same thistle I shared a few days ago. The previous image showed more of the surrounding foliage and associated thorns. I wanted to isolate this single stem more. So, I clipped it back and changed the angle slightly. Care had to be exercised to get the angle right, since I’m working with sunshine and not adjustable studio lights. I had to move around teh plant to get the angle and light right and after a few test shots this was the result.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/5 sec, f/10.0, ISO 200

High Resolution image on 500px:

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Spring Beauties”

“Spring Beauties” - Close Up

“In a rich moonlit garden, flowers open beneath the eyes of entire nations terrified to acknowledge the simplicity of the beauty of peace.”
― Aberjhani

Can you think of a more appropriate name for these delicate spring flowers, in tones of pink and purple? The Spring Beauty (Claytonia virginica) in my area seems to prefer the bases of Beech trees as their habitat, yet some small patches grow in the open. Most of the plants I came across ranged between nearly white to pale pink and patched with striped fuchsia. This particular specimen was light blue with purple tinges in the flower buds, thus the photo.

I enjoyed the slight ‘glow’ of the stems, as the filtered afternoon sun lit up the forest floor. The light this day was spectacular and really showed the colours and textures well. Apart for their unique colours, this small colony sat apart for others and allowed me to isolate them for other plants, which are becoming more abundant as temperatures rise in the forest.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com