Tag Archives: surprise

“Water Avens and Guest”

“Water Avens and Guest”

“Our brightest blazes of gladness are commonly kindled by unexpected sparks.”
― Samuel Johnson

I’m revisiting this interesting flower one more time. When I first discovered it, I was not sure what it was, so I took several photos, hoping to identify it when I got home from my hike.

Sometimes, a surprise awaits, as in this image, which shows the Avens flower very nicely but also includes a guest, in the form of a black beetle merrily eating away at one of the leaves.

It surprises me every time, that I do not notice these little subtleties, while focussing on my primary subject. Of course, since I did not notice it, I also did not try to bring it into focus, which I why it’s a bit soft.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/30 sec, f/10.0 ISO 800

for more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Chickadee in Flight”

“Chickadee in Flight”

“Let your boys test their wings. They may not be eagles, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t soar free.”
― C.J. Milbrandt

This image was a surprising treat for me. I had been photographing a chickadee perching on some cattails along a local pond. As with many small birds, they tend to be a bit skittish and fast moving. This one seemed to be quite content but suddenly took to flight. I hit the shutter a split second after it took off. Thinking I had missed it, I proceeded to make a few other photos before going home.

When I got home and reviewed my images, this one startled me. Where I was expecting a frame filled with out of focus cattails, I found this wonderful image of the chickadee in flight and looking quite determined. The slight motion blur enhances the experience for me, accenting the motion of the quickly beating wings.

I probably could not have planned for this any better, especially considering that I had only my macro lense with me. My one saving grace was that I had set my shutter speed high to freeze the twitchy movement of the chickadee feeding in the first place. Sometime things just work out.

Also, shooting with my D800 made it possible to crop the original (see below), significantly, to get his composition."Chickadee in Flight" original

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/1600 sec, f/2.8, ISO 100

High Resolution Image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Ghostly Greens”

“Ghostly Greens”

“Nothing is ever as simple as it seems. At the edge of perception, weird things dance and howl.”
― M.H. Boroson

Every now and then, a photo surprises me. For those of you who are photographers and take interest in my camera settings, which I post with most of my photos, you will have noticed that the studio florals do not vary a whole lot. I will tweak aperture if I want more depth of field and adjust shutter speed to compensate for that.

My results are fairly consistent. I end up with a low-key, fairly vibrant image of the blossom I am photographing. Also, since my studio lights are a consistent colour temperature, I don’t adjust my settings in post and I get predictable colour results, true to the original.

An exception to this was this blossom, a chrysanthemum, if I’m not mistaken. I suspect the blossoms have been dyed to this green tone, but the lights produced an unearthly green that did not match the original. They also caused the exterior petals to become quite diaphanous, making the whole image ghost-like. It first this bothered me, but on further consideration, I thought I’d publish the image as-is so you can also experience this effect. I’m sure there is an explanation for this, having to do with specific light frequencies, which I will have to research at some time in the near future.

By the way, this image was made only a few minutes after the carnation I posted yesterday.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
2.0 sec, f/32.0, ISO 100

Hi Resolution image on 500px

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“My Home Among the Cosmos”

“My Home Among the Cosmos”

“I live in my own little world. But its ok, they know me here.”
― Lauren Myracle

Another garden venture into the world of macro photography, which I am enjoying since it often brings about unexpected results. Like this little bug, which has made it’s home, deep inside the flower. I didn’t see him, even when composing the shot.

I still have lots to learn, as I have just started out with an inexpensive set of manual extension tubes and would value the advice of others with experience in macro. If I’m going to pursue this is it worthwhile investment in autofocus tubes or is the preference to remain manual and control the image?

Nikon D800
Nikkor AF 28-70mm f/3.5~F/4.5D
@ 50mm
1/400 sec, f/3.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com