Tag Archives: unexpected

“March Creek and Balsams”

March Creek and Balsams

“Joy is not in things; it is in us.” 
― Richard Wagner

A bit of fun this morning. I decided to ‘play’ with an image I made yesterday, by running it through a filter. The results are quite pleasing and I thought I’d share it today.

My photography has already become quite untraditional, through my use of motion. This is quite deliberate, as I am trying to document the world I experience in a different way. As I walk through the woods, I am drawn to things others would often miss, the slight movement of light through the trees, a hint of purple in the water. The movement I impart to my photos causes the viewer to have to look closer, to ‘fool’ the brain into not filtering based on pre-programmed notions of what something ‘should’ look like and focus on what is being viewed more intentionally. This often yields unexpected elements and, in my experince, enhances the colurs and textures already present in the image.

This is made a bit more apparent in the image above. All the colours and textures already existed but are filtered by the brain as it adjusts our perception. After all, snow is white, is it not? How often have you looked at a photo and wondered where all the blue shadows came from? Our cameras simply document the light that comes into them, unless we correct them with filters. Notice the slight turquoise tones to the snow, and the hints of purple. Next time you go out, have a try at seeing the scene ‘unfiltered’. You may be surprised.

Apple iPhone 7
iPhone 7 back camera 3.99mm f/1.8
1/120 sec, f/1.8, ISO 25

“Maple, with a Twist”

“Maple, with a Twist”

“And just because you turn out differently than everyone’s imagined you would doesn’t mean that you’ve failed in some way. A person who goes to med school because his entire family is full of doctors might find out that what he really wants to be is an artist instead.”
― Jodi Picoult

Here’s another image from yesterday’s hike. I’m always impressed at how some plants hang on to their leaves when neighbouring plants, of the same species, have dropped theirs. They are somehow  marvelously different, unexpected. Despite rains, heavy winds, and snowfall, this small maple hung onto a singular leaf. It almost appears as if the snow is trying to push the leaf off. yet it endures, at least long enough to fall into my sight. On even the dullest day, I come across these ‘exceptions’ and they brighten my day, because they are unexpected.

The twisty vine in this image is from an invasive species called Dog Strangling Vine, which grows in abundance here and is, despite being invasive, a delicate and interesting plant to photograph. I wrote about it earlier this year.

The combination of the leaf and the vine lead to the image title, yet another image of orange and white, much like yesterday’s post and a few prior to that. At some point, even the bright orange will fade into memory, the way yellow did a month ago.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/50 sec, f/3.5, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Monarch and Woodland Sunflowers”

“Monarch and Woodland Sunflowers”

“It is strange how new and unexpected conditions bring out unguessed ability to meet them.”
― Edgar Rice Burroughs

I did not set out to photograph flowers or butterflies this day. I was hoping to catch the Atlantic Salmon run at the Whitevale dam. I’ve gone there in the spring many times and have had good success with photographing the rainbow trout migration. However, I have yet to witness the salmon run which happens in the fall along the same creek. I will have to keep checking back.

What did happen on this hike was I found myself in a deep grove of woodland sunflowers that towered over my head. I made a few photos of them but the scale was lost in the photo. As a came around a bend in the creek, which ran right next to me, I looked up and saw this monarch butterfly resting peacefully on one of the sunflowers. I never did get a clear shot of him, but the photo above was one of the better views. It’s these unexpected moments that keep me constantly learning about my camera and to be prepared for any eventuality, lest I miss it, and the moment becomes mere memory.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Northern Sweet Coltsfoot” – Whitevale, Ontario

“Northern Sweet Coltsfoot” - Whitevale, Ontario

“The most fulfilling adventures happen when you start your journey without knowing where you’re going, because only then are you free to experience the unexpected detours you’re meant to take.” 
― A.J. Darkholme

Ah, yes, the unexpected, one of my greatest delights. I set out to make photos of fish spawning in a local creek and come across a large, beautiful cluster of spring flowers I have never encountered before. They looked a lot like the familiar Coltsfoot that I see daily now along the creek-bed and in ditches on the roadside. This plant seemed to have the forming leaves of the familiar coltsfoot and the stem of a coltsfoot, but the flower-head looked like an immature Milkweed. This struck me as odd, as I am familiar with most of the native plant species I encounter. Could this be some species that was planted in someone garden and escaped?

I also have a ‘thing’ for wildflowers and local plants, so tend to switch from traditional landscapes to the miniature landscapes that I find on the forest floor, along river basins, and on hillsides, as I travel the countryside.

I made this photograph and looked it up when I got home, a practice I have been following for some years to educate myself on the plants I come across throughout the year. This one surprised me, as I did not know there was such a thing as Sweet Coltsfoot. It all makes sense now and an unexpected encounter became a learning moment for me.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 122 mm
1/1250 sec, f/2.8 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“West of Yosemite”

West of Yosemite

Today’s post is a bit of a step back in time to 2013. One place I can never get enough of is Yosemite National Park in California. The sheer scale of the landscapes is overwhelming for a ‘flatlander’ like myself. There are opportunities for images that are just not possible where I live.

For example, the image above was made while leaving the park after a day of photography. Just when I thought I was saturated for the day, this wonderful scene presented itself.

The photo was made from a roadside “pull-out”along highway 41 and highlights the layers of hills that make up the Sierra Nevada foothills. It was late afternoon and it had rained off and on all day. This diffused the light nicely and created a faint mist that lies between each layer. Again, being a rather dull, wet day, also created the nice dark silhouettes of the trees in the foreground. It’s kind of a ‘moody’ image that conveys the type of day it was. I like to think this is a non-typical image of the Yosemite area, which is usually portrayed with images of waterfalls and grand vistas. I have found that the drive to the valley is also very picturesque.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 80mm
1/200 sec @ f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“The Unexpected” – Poplar Leaf on Log

I’ll admit to it.  I’m often looking for images to use as wallpapers for my desktop.  I guess I have a bit of desktop ADD.  I don’t like looking at the same images over and over and am always looking for something new and close to me.  There are many times where I see a suitable subject and photograph it, with the sole intention of creating a desktop wallpaper for myself.

This past week I went for a walk along my favourite local hiking trail and the poplars were just dropping their leaves after a hard frost.  There were a few ‘interesting’ leaves laying on the trail and a few stuck to logs along the way.  I stopped to make photos of a many of them.

I liked the composition of this particular image and began to process it, only to be totally surprised at all the colours present in the fallen leaf.  Really, there is purple and fuschia in this? I was seeing only the greens and yellows when I made the image. Nature is truly amazing, especially when you take the time to look closer.

I consider myself as an observer, but every now and then, the unexpected shows itself, as in this photo. I challenge all of you to get out there and observe. New perspective are in store and your assumptions of what is considered obvious, may be challenged.

Enjoy.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 @185mm
1/50 sec @ f.\3.5 -0.33. ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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