Tag Archives: Wake Robin

“One Last Look”

“One Last Look”

“Nature’s gifts are always fleeting. These moments must be savoured while we can, and then the moment is gone, leaving only fond memories and dreams for tomorrow.” – Ed Lehming

Alas, the final days of the wake-robin are at hand. These flowers which have brought me so much joy this summer are fading fast, with only a few intact specimens remaining. What the sun has not dried and the wind and rain (and snow) have not pummeled, slugs have scarred.

I recall only ten days ago, seeing and photographing the first few blossoms to emerge on a rainy, sleet filled day. At the time, they were among the only blossoms brave enough to open on that cold spring day. But now, the sun is rising every higher and white trilliums dominate the landscape. I looked along the path for an intact flower, for one last photo, knowing that by tomorrow they will all be gone.

I’ve really enjoyed the wake-robins this year, more than others. They have been plentiful and I’ve been able to get good images through a combination of good fortune and getting down low to the ground with my tripod. The light has been exceptional, with a few slightly overcast days providing me ideal conditions. Today was quite a bit brighter but I was able to find this blossom on the edge of the shadows, just enough so that the image is not overly harsh. I also wanted to make sure that all the petals were in sharp focus, so I used a very narrow aperture, higher ISO, and slower shutter speed to get me what I was after.

So, here it is, the final blossom, so I can enjoy one last look.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/100 sec, f/20.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Wake-Robin Pose”

“Wake-Robin Pose”

“Sometimes nature creates its own compositions, using what’s on hand, usually with wonderful results.” – Ed Lehming

This is my second red trillium (wake-robin) photo, but I do like them so much. For those who have tried to photograph them, they tend to pose two challenges: first, red is difficult to expose properly against the greens and browns of the forest floor. Most images are overexposed or details are lost. Second, red trillium blossoms tend to droop or face the forest floor, so it’s tough to get a straight on shot, unless you are willing to get real low to the ground. With the more and more present ticks, many of us now hesitate to do this without taking special precautions.

This past Sunday, nature helped me out. It was a cold sleet filled day and I was surprised that they were even blooming; all the other spring flowers had closed for the day. However, despite the overcast sky, there was good diffused light to photograph by, meaning I did not risk blown-out or overly contrasty images. I was also helped out by a fallen branch that this blossom was resting on, showing the full face of a nicely formed blossom. The stick also runs diagonally through the frame making for a lovely, naturally occuring composition. With a few minutes properly framing the image for a good angle and light balance, the resulting photo is shown here.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/80 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Mothers Day Wake-Robin 2020”

“Mothers Day Wake-Robin 2020”

“Be a Mother who is committed to loving her children into standing on higher ground than the environment surrounding them. Mothers are endowed with a love that is unlike any other love on the face of the earth.”
― Marjorie Hinckley

Mothers do not have it easy. They endure things that would make many give up, they weather the storm and are there for us when we need them, even if we don’t always know it. Despite all that is thrown at them, they still remain the most beautiful thing we can see.

That’s one of the reasons I chose this image, made only a few hours ago in a local forest. Despite unfavourable weather (it was a mere 4 degrees Celcius and sleeting when I made this image) these red trilliums or Wake-Robins were in full bloom this morning, while their white counterparts remained bundled up, waiting for warmer days. In fact, all the other wildflowers which had been blooming earlier in the week had pulled shut, but not these.

It seemed an appropriate image for this special day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm

1/180 sec, f/4.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“First Wake-Robin of the Season”

“We are living a life full of first experiences, from a first kiss, to the first time giving blood, to conceptual and philosophical explanations of humanity’s firsts.”
― Kat Lahr

I should call this series of photographs “Firsts”, since most of my recent posts have been of the first blossoms of local wildflowers. It’s been a bit of a strange season, with a few vigorous specimens blooming a few days ahead of their neighbouring companions.

That has made me wonder why those few are so much more advanced. It’s not anything obvious like more sunlight, less competition, or better soil that seems to be the cause. Though I do enjoy the isolation of the single blossoms, as they are not drowned out by a large bloom. Perhaps that’s why I’ve been so drawn to creating my studio images of flowers in isolation. It allows the viewer to focus on the details of the individual flower.

This Wake Robin, or red trillium, as it is commonly know here, was a single blossom surrounded by a large patch of Wild Ginger, which I intend to return to, since it is also about to bloom. The lighting was a bit harsher and more direct than I had wanted, despite being in a fairly dense forest glade. The bright lighting actually enhanced the petals, giving them an almost metallic appearance. There were many more plants close to blooming. I figure they will be in full show in the next day or two, if temperatures remain as mild as they have been the past few days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mm
1/40 sec, f/32.0 ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Wake Robins” – Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“Wake-Robins” - Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“I can still bring into my body the joy I felt at seeing the first trillium of spring, which seemed to be telling me, “Never give up hope, spring will come.” 
— Jessica Stern

The entrance of spring continues. After a day of cutting grass and getting gardens ready, I ventured out to a trail literally in my backyard. My hope was to see a few wildflowers emerging from their winter slumber, especially after this prolonged, cool, spring.

The regular patches I visit had a few sparse blossoms showing; they seemed thin and delayed, which did not come as a surprise. Given that, I followed the trail into the marshy woods and was greeted by an abundance of early bloomers. Among them, these beautiful Wake Robins or Red Trilliums, as some call them.

I love seeing these bright plants with their brilliant fresh leaves and red faces against the brown-gray background of the spring forest floor. It’s such a stack contrast between new life and the decay of the past. Needless to say, I spent quite a bit of time just drinking it in and making photos of the other species, which I will post over the next few days.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/25 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com