Tag Archives: walk

“Golden Moments”

“Golden Moments”

“Do you know how there are moments when the world moves so slowly you can feel your bones shifting, your mind tumbling? When you think that no matter what happens to you for the rest of your life, you will remember every last detail of that one minute forever?”
― Jodi Picoult

As I mentioned on a previous post, I had the opportunity this past weekend to get back on the trails, spend some time with my son, and make more photos.

In several aspects, we experienced ‘Golden Moments”. The soft autumn sunlight made both the canopy and forest floor glow with golden light, trees cast long, yet barely noticeable shadows on the ground, and we had a great time discussing photography, light, and composition.

My son is in his third year of university for film making and has a great sense for all of the above and is quite a talented photographer as well, yet he sees thing slightly differently from me, which has been a great learning experience for both of us, as we walk and discuss what and how we are seeing the scenes around of us.

Often he will see something that did not catch my eye and vice versa. The joy in this is that we are both able to communicate well what that ‘something’ is. Then the other will see it as well. I found this has expanded my art as a photographer significantly.

After all, if I can’t understand how others may see my work, then I believe I’m not fully communicating my vision.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 78 mm
1/80 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

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“Hobblebush Blossoms” – Secord Forest

“Hobblebush Blossoms” - Secord Forest

“I must have flowers, always, and always.”
― Claude Monet

This strange, flowering bush has fascinated me for some time. The blossoms form from the outside of the flower disc. I had a hard time finding good specimen this year but the photo above should suffice. The central bud clusters are rimmed with beautiful white blossoms. At first glance it would appear to be a form of dogwood, that is till you get closer and inspect the bright white flowers. It’s quite unique and the flowers are pure white. I’ve spotted then in open fields and deeper in the forest but he always catch my attention with their bright flowers.

This bush is one of several growing along the trail that leads into secord Forest, south of Uxbridge, Ontario and I just another testimony to the diverse flora and fauna that call this sanctuary home.

I was on my way into the forest to check on a group of orchids I would like to photograph in bloom. Sadly, after a long mosquito plagued hike, the orchids are still a day or two away from blooming. The flower buds have formed, so its just a matter of time. I’m really hoping to catch them before they fade or someone picks them.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 195 mm
1/320 sec, f/9.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

Thursday Doors – June 02, 2016

“Bloor Street United Church Doors” - Toronto

“Therefore, a search for God’s will should begin on your knees. He will meet you there. Remember that Jesus promised, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you” (Matthew 7:7).”
― James Dobson

I made this image the same day as my last post of teh Munk School of Global Affairs. The two building as quite close together on Toronto’s Bloor Street West.

As with so many other doors I am now photographing, I have walked past them many times, admiring the elements that make them unique. With these particular doors, the bright red paint is the first thing you see, then the orange columns, etc. The thing that amazes me, when reviewing the photos is just how many interesting elements the eye misses on first impressions.

The “No Parking” sign annoyed me, since I could not ‘frame it out” in my composition, and I considered editing it out. But, it’s because of the sign that I was able to make a photo of the doors, without cars blocking the view. So, it becomes important to the photo. It also adds some interesting messaging.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/50 sec, f/16.0, ISO 6400

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Forest Floor Companions”

“Forest Floor Companions”

“I am learning my way toward something that will make sense of my life, and I learn by going where I have to go, with whatever companions I am graced.” 
― Dean Koontz

At the base of a dead beech tree, these companions add brightness and life, among the dead and decomposing elements surrounding them.

For some unknown reason, the large beech trees in this local forest all died a few years ago. Many of them are very large and old, so it may just be a cycle, as there are many younger trees thriving in the same area. The die-off started a few years back and most of the elders are gone now, the bark peeling off their massive trunks,  branches falling to the ground with every passing winter. I also suspect a new housing development nearby may have altered the water table, ever so slightly, as to affect the older trees. The forest seems a bit ‘wetter’ than usual.

Yet, among all this death, spring offers her bounty of fresh life, in the form of wildflowers, growing in abundance at the base of these dead trees. There are Spring Beauties (Claytonia virginica), also known by some as May Flowers or Fairy Spuds (the roots and flowers are edible), with their bright pink faces and delicate stems. Then there are also Trout Lilies with their mottled leaves and bright yellow flowers. Mixed in among them, though not pictured here are red and white trilliums, to name the most predominant in my area. It seems every year there are more, which is wonderful to see.

To think a few short years ago I would walk these same trails and never notice anything but the white trilliums. There is something to be said for slowing down and just looking. It’s amazing what we can see, if we take the time.

Nikon D800
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Wake Robins” – Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“Wake-Robins” - Stouffville Reservoir Trail

“I can still bring into my body the joy I felt at seeing the first trillium of spring, which seemed to be telling me, “Never give up hope, spring will come.” 
— Jessica Stern

The entrance of spring continues. After a day of cutting grass and getting gardens ready, I ventured out to a trail literally in my backyard. My hope was to see a few wildflowers emerging from their winter slumber, especially after this prolonged, cool, spring.

The regular patches I visit had a few sparse blossoms showing; they seemed thin and delayed, which did not come as a surprise. Given that, I followed the trail into the marshy woods and was greeted by an abundance of early bloomers. Among them, these beautiful Wake Robins or Red Trilliums, as some call them.

I love seeing these bright plants with their brilliant fresh leaves and red faces against the brown-gray background of the spring forest floor. It’s such a stack contrast between new life and the decay of the past. Needless to say, I spent quite a bit of time just drinking it in and making photos of the other species, which I will post over the next few days.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/25 sec, f/11.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“A Walk Among the Cedars” – Seaton Trail

Walk Among the Cedars - Secord Forest

“Solitude is the soil in which genius is planted, creativity grows, and legends bloom; faith in oneself is the rain that cultivates a hero to endure the storm, and bare the genesis of a new world, a new forest.”
― Mike Norton

Solitude, sweet solitude, the place where I flourish, dream, recharge. I crave the quiet places, the forest trails, the meadows, and riverbanks. Each experience is such a part of me, and I a part of them. As I walk, stand, or sit, the majesty of nature, even the simple things, fill my eyes and mind with wonder. I am in creation, not merely a visitor, but a part of it. It fills me with joy and peace. Time ceases and I merely ‘am’.

For all the time I have spent walking the trails and photographing my surroundings, this one image fully expresses how it “feels” to me. I get emotional looking at it, since it puts me in that place I love so much. Not this particular location, so much, but how I feel when I’m in nature, overall.

The image has all the elements I experience on a regular basis when hiking near my home, the leaf covered path, the flowing forms of branches and leaves, sun shining brightly above and through openings in the canopy, and the dark spaces as well.

This photo was made a few short weeks ago along the Seaton Train, near Whitevale. The ice had just come of the trails and it was a beautiful, mild, late winter day.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/40 sec;   f/2.2;   ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Mature Alder Catkins”

“Mature Alder Catkins”

“Given the right lighting, all the colors in the world can be seen in a white object.”
– Michele Cooper

This time of year tends to be fairly challenging as far as finding interesting things to photograph. The ground tends to be muddy and accessing some areas is tough. There’s also the prevalence of browns and grays with very few bright colours. Yet, if I look around, I can still find some worthwhile subjects. In this case, the mature seed pods, or ‘catkins’ of a hazel tree growing in a local park. And, I was blessed with beautiful spring light, though spring is still a few short days away.

I liked the texture of the catkins and I though this particular composition had some potential, as I narrowed my depth of field to isolate on cluster. While my primary subject was the catkins, all sorts of bright colours emerged from the background as I processed the image. This made the photo even more appealing to me, as the background looks like some colourful drop sheet, and nothing like what appeared to be a mundane background when I made the image. Light always offers surprises.

Nikon D300
Tamron 70-200 mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm
1/100 sec, f/5.0, ISO 250

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com