Tag Archives: Water

“Dispersion”

“Dispersion”

“Anger is like flowing water; there’s nothing wrong with it as long as you let it flow. Hate is like stagnant water; anger that you denied yourself the freedom to feel, the freedom to flow; water that you gathered in one place and left to forget. Stagnant water becomes dirty, stinky, disease-ridden, poisonous, deadly; that is your hate. On flowing water travels little paper boats; paper boats of forgiveness. Allow yourself to feel anger, allow your waters to flow, along with all the paper boats of forgiveness. Be human.”
― C. JoyBell C.

Today, an image I made back in the summer, at a local conservation area. The water flows through a small dam and concrete spillway, splashing a concrete pad below. I’ve photographed the chute a few times for the side, but had not considered this view till that day and decided to do a longer exposure to highlight the flow and spray of the water and communicate the energy I saw.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70mm
1/10 sec, f/18.0, ISO 2000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“The Gut Falls” – Apsley, Ontario

“The Gut Falls” - Apsley, Ontario

“Light can be both friend and foe, too much or too little and the full story is not told, overexposed or unseen, parts are missing. Balance, deliberate balance of light, is the way to see the true scene. Our eyes are designed to create that balance, humans are created for balance, and I try to imitate that through my images. – Ed Lehming

Still on the topic of ‘The Gut” Conservation area, near Apsley, Ontario. I had to revisit this waterfall, through a slightly different image. This one is a bit wider than the previous post and shows the flow of the water much better, in my opinion. I arrived at the falls at about 4:30pm. The light was still very direct and I was concerned about getting balanced image, especially since I wanted to do some long exposures. I shot this in RAW format, as I do with all my photos and kept it slightly underexposed, knowing that I could compensate for that when I processed the image.

I was quite happy at how it turned out, retaining the details and showing off the patchy, forest filtered light, without it being a distraction, and I was still able to get a bit of ‘shimmer’ from the moving water, rather than it simply being soft and milky. I believe the image captures the energy and movement as I saw it, which is my goal.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/10 sec, f/32.0, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Cool Runnings” – Papineau Creek

“Cool Runnings” - Papineau Creek

“The river moved so swiftly and yet it had no purpose other than to flow, just flow.”
― Gioconda Belli

During a recent backcountry drive, I tried to retrace my route to a little gem of a park I found a few years back. There is no road sign identifying the park, just an unmarked road that leads to a beautiful groomed park on the shores of Papineau Creek, near Maynooth, Ontario.

Just before the creek enters the park area, it flows through a short set of rapids. On a hot summer day this was a nice spot to stop and cool down by the water, make some photos, and just enjoy the refreshing sound of the water as it gurgles over the rocks.

It was quite a bright day and without a neutral density filter,  it look a bit of effort to get my shutter speed down enough to soften the flow of the water. I used strategic timing of passing clouds to finally get the results I was after, keeping the rocks nice and sharp and highlighting the movement of the water.

Nikon D800
Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G I AF-S VR Zoom
@ 110 mm
1 sec, f/32.0, ISO 125

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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“Blue Flag Iris” – Marble Lake

Southern Blue Flag

“While there is perhaps a province in which the photograph can tell us nothing more than what we see with our own eyes, there is another in which it proves to us how little our eyes permit us to see.”
― Dorothea Lange

I find myself working with photos that did not quite communicate my vision as intended. I see so much more in my composition, but struggle to articulate just what that is. When that ‘something’ does not present itself, or can’t be extracted in the final product I call these my ‘seconds’. I don’t delete them, but rather, I hang onto them with the intent of revisiting them at some future date as my editing skills grow or I am better able to extract that ‘essence’ that I first saw or felt when I made the image. There are also some great plugins out there that enhance the image enough for me that I get closer to what I wanted.

My recent go-to is Topaz Impression, which allows me to create painterly effects that are closer to how I imagined the image when I composed the shot .

The irises pictured above grow along the shores of a small lake where our family spends much of the summer. My days are generally spent reading, canoeing, and photographing. I do like combining the latter activities and find some nice images offered me as I glide slowly along the shore.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/13.0, ISO 5600

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“Papineau Creek Guardian”

Papineau Creek Guardian

“Solitary. But not in the sense of being alone. Not solitary in the way Thoreau was, for example, exiling himself in order to find out where he was; not solitary in the way Jonah was, praying for deliverance in the belly of the whale. Solitary in the sense of retreat. In the sense of not having to see himself, of not having to see himself being seen by anyone else.”
― Paul Auster

I have admitted before that I have a love of solitary trees. They stand alone, each with a story. They stand as silent witnesses to the world that moves around them, with no apparent support from their peers. I’m especially fond of trees that cling to the edge of water. The roots holding firm to land while being provided abundant water from below.

This beautiful red pine captivated me. The forest floor was littered with its needles, blocking off invading weeds. The creek seemed to bend towards it, just far enough to make contact with the roots. I know, the creek was there first and took advantage of the creek but that was the image my mind saw.

At this point in its course, Papineau creek has just come through a series of beautiful rapids and has slowed as it passes the pine. It’s a very serene image that I wanted to share here.

I came across this place in the fall a few years ago and returned this past weekend. It’s a very peaceful little park, with no signage leading you to it. I like to look at it as a private retreat, though I’m sure local residents know about it.

iPhone 5s back camera 4.15mm f/2.2
1/220 sec, f/2.2, ISO 32

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
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“York River Backcountry”

York River Backcountry

“I thought how lovely and how strange a river is. A river is a river, always there, and yet the water flowing through it is never the same water and is never still. It’s always changing and is always on the move. And over time the river itself changes too. It widens and deepens as it rubs and scours, gnaws and kneads, eats and bores its way through the land.”
― Aidan Chambers

The York River, in Central Ontario runs from Baptiste Lake, meanders through the region and changing its aspect several times along its course. It is inaccessible, other than by canoe through much of its journey.

I’ve hiked to many of the chutes and paddled several sections of this beautiful river. Yesterday, I went for a back-country drive, looking for a diversion from wildflowers, though I found many of them too.

During this drive I came across a road named Iron  Bridge Road. The name got my attention and I proceeded to see where this “Iron Bridge” was, hoping I was not committing to a long drive, only to find that there used to be an iron bridge.

The bridge itself was not far down the road and I was pleasantly surprised to discover that it cross the York River and offered a nice view of the river as it wound its way through the back-country as a gentle flow, with lily pads and arrowroot growing along the shores. From my maps, it would appear it continues this way for several miles, before entering into a series of rapids and chutes.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 200 mm
1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Baptismal Elements” – St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York

“Baptismal Elements” - St. Patricks, Cathedral New York

“The Church does not dispense the sacrament of baptism in order to acquire for herself an increase in membership but in order to consecrate a human being to God and to communicate to that person the divine gift of birth from God.”
― Hans Urs von Balthasar

I can’t fully explain what it was that attracted me to this composition. Yet, I find myself processing that very though in this post.

The golden urn and bowl seemed to stand out from other elements around them. The soft, natural light playing on the mottled gray walls further enhanced the image by isolating the table in the foreground.

It’s a simple scene really, and reminds me a bit of the still life paintings in the Dutch Golden Age style, with their bright golden tones and simple depictions of everyday items.

I also thought this composition might make a nice church bulletin cover, celebrating baptism, which is something I used to produce regularly a few years back. The table seems to be ready and waiting, prepared for something to happen.

Nikon D300
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 70 mm
1/60 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/EdLehming
or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com