Tag Archives: waves

“Sunset Swell”

“Sunset Swell”

“One day, all your worries will set like the sun does and deserved happiness will come gushing like waves at the beach do. All you need to make sure is that your trips to beach never end.” 
― Jasleen Kaur Gumber

Another glorious end of day at Sauble Beach. Even the gentlest dusk breezes move the water into waves that endlessly lap at the shore. Some, a bit more aggressively than others.

I spent the day at the lakeshore, watching the character of the waves shift throughout the day; from powerful, rolling, two meter swells to the gentle rollers of twilight. It was, basically, a day for doing nothing other than experiencing the movement of water and sharing that time with friends and family. A rather nice way to spend the day.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro 1:1 (272ENII)@90mmm
1/4 sec, f/16.0, ISO 400

For more images like this, please visit my website (images are available for purchase)
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“Pacific Surge”

“Leading Edge”“Passing Wave”“I really don’t know why it is that all of us are so committed to the sea, except I think it’s because in addition to the fact that the sea changes, and the light changes, and ships change, it’s because we all came from the sea. And it is an interesting biological fact that all of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean, and, therefore, we have salt in our blood, in our sweat, in our tears. We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea – whether it is to sail or to watch it – we are going back from whence we came.
― John F. Kennedy

On this rare occasion, I am posting two photos on the same post. The two are necessary to show just how intense even a slight surge can be when it come to the vast body of water known as the Pacific Ocean.

The photos were made on our way back in from whale watching. I had not paid much attention to the water, since I was so focused on observing and photographing the whales (see my previous posts). In a few of those photos, you can see other vessels dropping behind waves but it was even more pronounced as we came closer to shore and I could see just how high some of these swells really were.

At first glance, you might think it’s simply my horizon that is off, yet the horizon is perfectly level, but the boat I was in was riding the lead edge of a wave. Again, I was really more focused on photographing the surf on the rocks and it was not till I started reviewing the images that I noticed just how intense these surges really were. I guess I had my sea legs, since it did not bother me at all.

The first image is of the rocky coast just north of Cabo san Lucas, Mexico. The rocks are polished smooth by eons of wear by the ever active ocean and are part of the thirty million year old granite structure that makes up most of the Baja Peninsula. A pelican graces the top of one of the lower spires. Can you see it?

The second image shows the wave as it passes by next to the boat, obscuring most of the rocks visible in the first image. I’d estimate the swells to be about two to three meters high. It’s a bit disappointing that I did not use a narrower aperture because the camera now focused on the water, rather than the shoreline. Next time I’ll manually focus. I also zoomed out a bit to show the size of the waves.

Image 1.
Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 300 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 200

Image 2.
Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD @ 200 mm
1/250 sec, f/8.0, ISO 200

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Monochrome Monday – “Awash in a Sea of White”

“Awash, In a Sea of White”

This was a bit of a theme for me last week as I was out making photos. Soft, pure, snow blanketed the fields and open spaces during my extended hikes. The low angle of the sun in the winter sky accentuated the shadows.

As I reviewed the many images I realized that as mono images and without context these images could be of almost anything: water, sand, cloth, foam, or soft clouds. What I liked most about this particular image was the gentle flow punctuated by a few coarser areas.

In reality, I am just happy to be able to capture accurately what I’m seeing. Snow is a real challenge and I have to fool my camera on exposure, especially on bright days.

Nikon D800
Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
 @ 105 mm
1/200 sec, f/7.1, ISO 100

For more images like this, please visit my Facebook page:
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or my website (some images available for purchase)
http://www.edlehming.com

“Storm Front over Lake Huron”

“Storm Front over Lake Huron”

A revisit to what started as a beautiful mid August day at Sauble Beach this past August.

We had heard forecasts of rain all day, but the day started out sunny and windy. Since it was too windy for a good game of volleyball, we all headed to town for a bit to shop. Shortly thereafter, the clouds, which had been hanging far out on the lake started to roll in and thicken. From town, I could see the thin gray clouds start to thicken and take on strong structures and definition. So, I headed back to the cottage to retrieve my camera and head across the road to the beach.

This is what greeted me. A solid wall of black cloud with clearly defined shear zones. The wonder of Lake Huron is that it is so big and scenes like this may be taking place at a fairly long distance. As I stood and watched, a secondary dark cloud formed at the frontal boundary and began to roll like a wave against the other cloud at this ‘transition’ line. It was very dramatic and I was happy to be able to capture it while staying dry. This cloud movement went on for a long time over the water before it gradually moved to shore and started to rain. All the while, many people carried on watching the drama unfold in front of them and still swimming in the surf caused by the storm.

Nikon D300
Nikor 70-300mm @ 86mm
1/60 sec @ f/10, ISO 280

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